Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Rodgers 840

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • toodles
    replied
    Rodgers used incandescent lamps in the music rack, so unless somebody replaced them with LED's, the polarity doesn't matter. You can take the cover off the music rack lamp to see if it has bulbs or LEDs.

    On the amp, the gray wire is the input to the amp, and it makes sense to go to the back of the pedal channel socket. Rodgers usually used a 6-channel amp in the 840; perhaps when they built this particular organ, they only had a 3 and a 2 channel amp board, so they substituted a separate amp for the pedal. Or, perhaps, the pedal channel amp blew out, and a service tech substituted a stand-alone single channel amp. Rodgers did use a separate amp on some models of this vintage (e.g., the 770 and 760)..

    Leave a comment:


  • hcmaestro
    replied
    Good Evening All,

    I have a couple more questions for you Rodgers wizards.

    The previous owner has unplugged the 2 wires from the music rack light; I wasn't sure which wire goes to which or if it even matters (DC or AC). Both wires off the rack are black, and the 2 terminals are orange and white/green. Which goes to which??

    Last question for the night: the amplifier below the power supply has only 3 cables - power, the gray cable which appears to go behind the preamp board and be wired into the back of the "pedal channel" socket, and a pair of speaker wires that intersect with the speaker wire bundle coming off the preamp board. Is it possible that the organ has a separate amp for the pedal channel only? Is this common in Rodgers?

    Thanks for the info!

    Leave a comment:


  • toodles
    replied
    Yes, of course!

    Also, note that on the 840, the native Rodgers chiff (not the Walker enhanced articulation) can be adjusted octave by octave from the front of the console. There is a switch on the multi-function board which has to enable the changes (normally set to the enabled position in home installations) but from there, the setting is done from the front of the console.

    Leave a comment:


  • plymouth53
    replied
    Some information on adjusting the chiff, related to the Rodgers 760. It may not apply to the 840, but gives you an idea of the procedure. It's involved. You need the service manual to keep track of all the steps. The loudness is programmable on an octave-by-octave basis for the flutes and principals. There are seven levels. The organ must be switched to the test mode, and then you follow the steps. Using the Tutti indicator and Transposer indicator/switch you select the loudness for each octave. When done, the changed settings are locked in. If you have a service manual for the 840, it might explain if the chiffs are adjustable. Hope that isn't confusing information.

    Toodles, can I get a copy of your information on the Walker DKA circuit boards.
    Thankyou,
    Plymouth53

    Leave a comment:


  • jbird604
    commented on 's reply
    The extreme chiff you hear might not be coming from the Walker boards. The regular Rodgers keying circuitry on these organs has both "air puff" (burst of white noise) and actual "chiff" (higher pitched transient) added to the basic pitches. This is adjustable, probably on the output preamp, with controls for "chiff" and "puff" or something like that, on a rank by rank basis.

  • Admin
    commented on 's reply
    With trems off no doubt?

  • toodles
    replied
    I've heard the slightest amount of chiff in my Allen MDS Theatre III tibias. I think most classical organists wouldn't even consider it chiff, and isn't really audible in normal playing--only careful listeneing on single notes when trying to hear the attack.

    Leave a comment:


  • Admin
    commented on 's reply
    I've never heard chiff in a theatre organ. It's primarily found in baroque instruments. Theatre organs are characterized by deep tremulants. Are you conflating chiff and tremulants?

  • myorgan
    commented on 's reply
    The chiff is probably set to be played through speakers in a larger space than your headphones can supply (unless your head is hollow).

    For the Alesis, I believe the Nanoverb is what most people use, due to price and functionality. Alternately, you could run the sound through a mixer with on-board effects (i.e. Behringer Xenyx 1204FX).

    Michael

  • hcmaestro
    replied
    Well, gents, thank you for the info. I replaced the severed power cable ends, and powered up the 840 (without the amp power plugged in). I plugged in a set of headphones, and everything seems to work fine. The chiff is WAY too much, like a theater organ, and the sound in the headphones is painfully dry, so I am thinking it needs a reverb. I noticed that plymouth53 mentioned an Alesis digital reverb, does anyone have a suggestion for a specific model that might be effective? I know Alesis is pretty well regarded by many.

    Leave a comment:


  • hcmaestro
    commented on 's reply
    The M-DAG is putting a LOT of chiff on the great stops, it sounds like way too much to me.
    I think I’ll try the kill switch and see if the sound is more pleasant. Are the pots supposed to be user adjustable? Maybe if there was about 50% less it would be palatable.

  • toodles
    replied
    I have some documentation on the DKA keyers, but not on the DMAG boards. On the DKA boards, the air adjustment isn't to be adjusted unless the noise source (Q10) is changed; the others are adjusted by ear, but with the internal Rodgers air puff turned down.

    Leave a comment:


  • plymouth53
    replied
    quantum,
    No, I didn't find any documentation either. The information in my post came from Walker in Colorado. The MDAG had the factory paint marks on all the pots, so I never changed them from original. The DKA2 (three of them) in this organ had been added sometime later, not a factory install. Each pot has an etched label, so I guessed at what they would do. I found the "level", if turned up to high, would distort the organ voice. I finally turned the level down so the boards would stop adding the air sound. The 760 was a project organ with many problems to fix, and I decided the DKA2 added to the issues and left them turned off. It's possible the boards were bad? Anyway, the 760 has since been sold.

    Leave a comment:


  • quantum
    commented on 's reply
    Do you have any more documentation on the Walker boards? I've also got them on my 760 but it has been difficult finding any details on what the pots control or any voicing procedures.

  • plymouth53
    replied
    I meant to also say in my previous post. I added an Alesis reverb to the 760, using the RCA jacks (as shown in your picture), and found the Rodgers would over drive the Alesis and cause hum. So I put a 100K ohm resistor in both the input and output leads going to the Alesis. It reduced the amount of reverb level but the hum was gone. I didn't experiment with different resistance values, so their might be a better value that gives more reverb.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X