Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Light Bulb help

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Light Bulb help

    Hello!
    My Parish has a Johannus Rembrandt 377, and the music stand lightbulb went out. The Johannus customer line wont answer, and this its no where on the internetClick image for larger version

Name:	WIN_20220513_09_54_20_Pro.jpg
Views:	154
Size:	324.2 KB
ID:	799615, so I need your help! There are Numbers on one side, they are: 0f 827 2506.
    the head of music at mellophoneman100 (you tube)

    baldwin studio II
    hammond N300
    and a nice pair of holton french horns :P

  • #2
    Have you tried emailing aftersales(at)globalorgangroup.com?
    td

    Comment


    • #3
      Yep, They responded with one email acknowledging the inquiry, and then have been silent for almost a month...
      the head of music at mellophoneman100 (you tube)

      baldwin studio II
      hammond N300
      and a nice pair of holton french horns :P

      Comment


      • #4
        It’s a tricky business. It looks fluorescent, and if it’s a fluorescent bulb, it may not be the bulb at all, but the ballast. What I would do is replace it with LED’s:

        https://www.homedepot.ca/product/com...ar-/1000859444

        I’ve bought these before. If you open them up the LED’s are mounted on a thin strip and have an aluminum heat sink. If you get a thinner piece of aluminum or cut the one present, then glue it into the enclosure with heat resistant adhesive it could work. There’s lot of other approaches too. I wouldn’t hold my breath waiting for Johannus to get back to you. They are a good company, but there are a lot of supply problems globally at the moment.

        Alternatively, you can just mount the replacement in a convenient location!

        Current: Allen 225 RTC, W. Bell reed organ, Lowrey TGS, Singer upright grand
        Former: Yamaha E3R
        https://www.exercisesincatholicmythology.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Larason2 View Post
          What I would do is replace it with LED’s:

          I second that. Some fluorescent type tubes are beginning to become even harder to find than incandescent bulbs.

          Side note: One consideration when it comes to LEDs is that -- in some cases -- the LED driver circuitry can generate electromagnetic interference (EMI) which can affect sensitive audio equipment, be that the organ or the PA system, or both, either via radiation or transmission. Poorly designed/constructed driver circuitry can inject EMI into the power mains.

          As regards the original part, have you tried contacting your nearest/local Johannus dealer? They may be more responsive.
          -------

          Hammond M-102 #21000.
          Leslie 147 #F7453.
          Hammond S-6 #72421

          Comment


          • #6
            I have, unfortunately they had no idea! The best we have come up with is that it is a cold cathode florescent... I may end up just putting an led strip light in the cavity where this went, and run the power over the top of the console. it wont be pretty but its better than nothing.
            the head of music at mellophoneman100 (you tube)

            baldwin studio II
            hammond N300
            and a nice pair of holton french horns :P

            Comment


            • #7
              Johannus used these lamps for many years in their music racks. They are indeed fluorescent--the electronics are housed in a cavity in the music rack behind the on/off switch.

              The standard part number for these lamps is FM13/830. A quick search brought up several suppliers showing this part in stock. It could be obsolete but is evidently still widely available.

              If your problem is a no-light condition, the cause is almost certainly the lamp.

              These bulbs work well and give a good uniform up and down light that is hard to duplicate with LEDs. To do so, you would end up needing two sets of strips, one pointed up and the other down. I did such a conversion a while back in a big Rembrandt to get the organist more music rack light, and the project ended up taking several hours. If you are satisfied with the amount of light and just need a bulb, I would stick with what you have.

              To address another comment above, I noticed no EMF resulting from the LEDs or the power supply, even with a PWM dimmer that I included in the installation.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by don60 View Post
                To address another comment above, I noticed no EMF resulting from the LEDs or the power supply, even with a PWM dimmer that I included in the installation.
                Then clearly you used a product with a well designed power supply. Plenty are not in that league; in fact they could be classed as illegal radio transmitters.
                -------

                Hammond M-102 #21000.
                Leslie 147 #F7453.
                Hammond S-6 #72421

                Comment


                • #9
                  CCFL lamps were predominately used as backlights for LCD display panels.

                  As these have failed or dimmed, LED replacements have been developed.

                  Both the original CCFL ballasts and the LED controllers use 'Buck Converter' implementation (not low frequency PWM).

                  Typical LED replacements are 2mm x 4mm x L, with controllers requiring a 10-30v power supply (12v wall-wart) and also having a brightness control.

                  Here is an example on *bay . These are 540mm long, but can be shortened by cutting off groups of LEDS's (3 per group).

                  Positioned 'back to back' these will have comparable dimensions and generate similar illumination to the original CCFL tube.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I think EMF is a confusing topic. First of all, what it stands for. I’ve seen electromagnetic field, electromagnetic frequencies, and electro motive force, the three terms are related, but also different. These are all applicable to electronics, and organs in particular. Then there is why they are (potentially) bad. Definitely back EMF coming from solenoids can be harmful for other electronic components, and that’s why it’s good to have diodes as circuit protection. Also, any current running through a wire generates an electromagnetic field, and I personally do think that these fields do affect our bodies, but it’s hard to pinpoint exactly what negative affect they have if any, and it’s hard to escape from this unless you have no electrical devices in your home. In theory, electromagnetic fields and radio frequency emissions from electronic components can cause audio interference, but I’ve yet to experience this from LED’s, but maybe I’ve only ever purchased good quality ones. I just buy the $20 ones that have warmer light from home depot. They do have a relatively big power supply for their size. When it comes to fluorescent bulbs, I think it’s important to realize too that they emit radiation in more than the visible spectrum, and that this may have potential effects too, besides the fact that there may be emissions from a fluorescent bulb’s ballast that we’re not aware of as well. Then there’s potential safety issues arising from the mercury in most fluorescent bulbs - this only matters if you break them, but the risk is always there.

                    I think overall you have to weigh the pros and cons of each technology, then choose what is the best balance. And when it comes to interference, it’s sometimes hard to plan for its effects. Sometimes you have to choose a technology, then if you experience interference, make adjustments based on what you experience.

                    Current: Allen 225 RTC, W. Bell reed organ, Lowrey TGS, Singer upright grand
                    Former: Yamaha E3R
                    https://www.exercisesincatholicmythology.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by don60 View Post
                      The standard part number for these lamps is FM13/830. A quick search brought up several suppliers showing this part in stock. It could be obsolete but is evidently still widely available.

                      To address another comment above, I noticed no EMF resulting from the LEDs or the power supply, even with a PWM dimmer that I included in the installation.
                      Sweet, thank you! We will try it. Otherwise, we will have to find a different solution
                      Last edited by myorgan; 05-16-2022, 04:22 PM. Reason: Remove excess quoting.
                      the head of music at mellophoneman100 (you tube)

                      baldwin studio II
                      hammond N300
                      and a nice pair of holton french horns :P

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X