Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Jennings vox continental keyboard removal

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Jennings vox continental keyboard removal

    I have a much loved 1964 single manual vox continental. It's a uk built model with wooden keys. Some of the key contacts are noisy and I would like to clean them. I wonder if anyone could advise how I get access to the key contacts on this wooden key model ?

    thanks

    Nick, Bristol, UK

    #2
    Not the easiest thing to reach, but just work slowly and patiently. Here goes:

    Remove the screw on the underside of the case below the center of the keyboard. (Above where your knees would be if you were sitting and playing.) Remove the orange lid. (Four screws.) Remove the two long wood screws on either side of the keyboard. Here's the one on the treble side:

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Keyboard_screw1.jpg Views:	0 Size:	80.5 KB ID:	665221

    The keyboard is now free to move. Pull out all the drawbars all the way. Gently tilt the keyboard back into an upright position, using some kind of wedge to keep it from falling over. Be careful with this, since you can easily break off wires that are soldered to the key contact assembly.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Wedge.jpg Views:	0 Size:	26.4 KB ID:	665222

    Loosen the adjustment screw on the bracket, leaving the nut in place so you can tell how far to replace it when you are done. This photo shows the screw already backed out.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Contacts_assembly_brace.jpg Views:	0 Size:	65.7 KB ID:	665223

    On the top of the key contact assembly (under the brace), there is a plate you can see in the photo above that covers the key contacts. I believe there are 18 screws that hold it in place. Remove them, remove the plate and you'll have access to the key contacts. (One on the far right also secures a ground lug, so make sure you replace the lug when you re-assemble everything.) Make sure you use something suitable for cleaning the key contacts. I use 99% Isopropyl alcohol.

    Now go make that organ sing!

    Alan
    1954 Hammond B2; Leslie 21H, 31H; 1965 UK Vox Continental;
    1967 Gibson G101 1974 Rhodes Stage 73; 1972 Rhodes Sparkletop Piano Bass; 1978 Hohner Clavinet D6; 1968 Hohner Pianet N II; 1966 Wurlitzer 140B; 1980 Minimoog; 1977 Fender Twin Reverb; Vox AC30 (SEE THE COLLECTION: https://vintagerockkeyboards.com/ )

    Comment


      #3
      For key contact cleaning I can recommended isopropyl alcohol for the initial cleaning followed up by deoxit red. It’s a bit expensive but it works wonders
      Last edited by myorgan; 09-11-2019, 05:27 PM.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Garryk View Post
        For key contact cleaning I can recommended isopropyl alcohol for the initial cleaning followed up by deoxit red. It’s a bit expensive but it works wonders
        For isopropyl alcohol, you want as high a concentration as you can find. The 70% concentration "rubbing alcohol" you find in drug stores contains water and sometimes other additives, such as fragrances, and can leave a film. If all you can find is 91% concentration, that's probably okay. But 99% is what you really want to use.

        Alan
        1954 Hammond B2; Leslie 21H, 31H; 1965 UK Vox Continental;
        1967 Gibson G101 1974 Rhodes Stage 73; 1972 Rhodes Sparkletop Piano Bass; 1978 Hohner Clavinet D6; 1968 Hohner Pianet N II; 1966 Wurlitzer 140B; 1980 Minimoog; 1977 Fender Twin Reverb; Vox AC30 (SEE THE COLLECTION: https://vintagerockkeyboards.com/ )

        Comment

        Working...
        X