Forum Top Banner Ad

Collapse

Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What is the meaning between all the Hammond model names?

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What is the meaning between all the Hammond model names?



    I was just researching the different organs and came up with strange, seemingly random names such as A-100, XK-3 and 1, model A and BC. So can you elaborate on what all these mean what does. I know B-3 stands for bench with 3 types of percussion.</P>


    Hammond model A mean? Model BC? Model E? Model C? Model D?</P>


    C/B-2 </P>


    RT-2/3?</P>


    A-100/105?</P>


    X-66/77?</P>


    H-100/300?</P>


    XB-3?</P>


    XH-200?</P>


    XK-1/3</P>


    I'm sorry but I'm new to Hammonds and feel these names are a lot more random and technical than other brands such as Lowrey with simple model names such as the Heritage, Carnival, and Parade. Sure Hammond used a few names such as Aurora, Grandee, Colonnade, but if anyone can dichipher these technical meanings, i would greatly appreciate it.</P>

  • #2
    Re: What is the meaning between all the Hammond model names?



    I'm sure you can find a great deal of info on the internet. The basics are: The A, B and C models were the original tone wheel models. Small differences were indicated by add on letters. The BC had an extra generator tuned sharp to give a less sine-wave effect. The C was nothing but a B with a full cabinet that hid the organists feet (used in churchs for the most part). The B-A was a B with a roll playing mechanism added. The D (and RT3) had a 32 note pedalboard and more voices for the pedal. Many "letters" followed these initial models as the home market was expanded. In later years these letters were used again for models that bore lttle relation to their ancestors. They were often followed by numbers that indicated little more than the cabinet type they were housed in.</P>


    The X models were the beginning of the non-tonewheel era. The X66 and X77 wre the best known of the 60's era models. Many of the other "X" numbers would have been produced after the Hammond name was bought by others.</P>


    I have to say that I have never heard the "bench + 3 percussions" source for the B3 name. I assumed it was called that because of updates from its forerunner the B2.</P>

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: What is the meaning between all the Hammond model names?



      They are much less technical than you seem to think.</P>


      The original Hammond organ in 1935 was the model A. It had a 4-legged console like the later models, and was equipped with a Tremulant, as were all the early Hammonds. Later, when Vibrato was developed, a kit was available to replace the Tremulant withVibrato, and the console then became an AV. No AVs were ever made at the factory, they were all retrofits.</P>


      After the A came the B, (actually AB) which was just like the A except it had a deeper console. You could also get the B with a separate Chorus generator (the effect was similar to the Vibrato Chorus which came later), which was a model BC. If a Vibrato kit was added later, it became a BCV. As with the A, no BCVs were made at the factory.</P>


      When Vibrato was developed, the Chorus generator was discontinued, and the model BV replaced the BC.</P>


      The model C was just like the B except the console was closed in front, making it more suitable for church use, or so some people thought. Model Cs with the Chorus generator were called model D rather than CC, for reasons known only to people no longer around. Again, if these consoles were retrofitted for Vibrato, they became CV and DV.</P>


      The model E (some people claim the E stood for ecclesiastical, but I have never seen it substantiated) was more of a concert instrument, with a full 32-note pedalboard, separate expression pedals for swell and great manuals, and separate Tremulants for each manual.</P>


      After WW II, the model E was discontinued in favor of the RT concert organ, which had the 32 note pedalboard but no split Vibrato and a single expression pedal. It did have a "Pedal Solo" unit which added synthesized complex harmonics to the pedals under control of the player.</P>


      Around 1949, "Selective Vibrato" was introduced which allowed each manual to have the Vibrato turned on or not separately. These models had a -2 suffix appended, and the V suffix was dropped. Hence BV was now B-2, CV was now C-2, and RT was now RT-2.</P>


      In the mid-1950s, percussion was added to the consoles, and the suffix changed from -2 to -3: B-3, C-3, and RT-3. That ended the sequence for the classic tonewheel organs.</P>


      There were a whole bunch of other instruments that used model numbers after E, such as the Novachord, Solovox, etc. The next one of lasting consequence was the spinet model M. Similarly to the full size consoles, the Ms were replaced by the M-2 having split vibrato, and the M-2 was replaced by the M-3 also having percussion.</P>


      So the letters on the classic tonewheels were more or less sequential with a couple of exceptions.</P>


      In the late 1950s, full size consoles were introduced having internal power amplifiers and speakers. The A-100 was basically a C-3 with power amplifier and speakers (and reverberation which by that time had been introduced in Hammond tone cabinets), and the last digit of the number indicated the furniture style of the cabinetry.</P>


      I will have to leave it to someone else to explain the cabinet style codes and the other models after that. I am strictly a Hammond classicist.</P>


      You didn't ask, but Hammond tone cabinet models also were in sequence. The first ones were A-20 and A-40, and so on down the line:B-40, C-20, D-20, etc. The -20 or -40 signified the audio power output:20 watt or 40 watt. Later, when reverberation was developed, models with reverberation had an R suffix: ER-20, HR-40, etc</P>


      Hope this helped</P>
      1937 Model E
      PR-40 w/Accutronic Reverberation
      Leslie 31-H
      Schulmerich ChimeATron

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: What is the meaning between all the Hammond model names?

        [quote user="pipecutter"]


        I have to say that I have never heard the "bench + 3 percussions" source for the B3 name. I assumed it was called that because of updates from its forerunner the B2.</P>


        [/quote]</P>


        Metoo - I'm pretty certain this one is made up, probably by someone who didn't know what he was talking about. The B3 actually only has two percussions: second and third; or if you add in the different options for soft vs. normal, and fast vs. slow decay, uhh... (trying to remember factorials from school...) = eight? (more than three at any rate.) And all Hammonds came with benches after all! As pipecutter says, the B3 was called the B3 simply because it was an update of the B2, which was in turn an update of the BV, etc. etc....but the "B" ultimately just meant that it was the first update of the original model "A" (which you cantrace in ME+ME's excellent synopsis.)</P>


        Anyway here's a great site that gives a nice summary of lots of different models:</P>


        http://theatreorgans.com/hammond/faq/all_hammondss.html</P>


        The electronic or LSI Hammonds are underrepresented here, though. Anyone know a site with info on those?</P>


        TD</P>
        Nobody loves me but my mother,
        And she could be jivin' too...

        --BB King

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: What is the meaning between all the Hammond model names?

          <SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">
          <P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'">The way I would see in a general sense applicable to tonewheel organs and earlier electronic models:<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p></SPAN></P>
          <P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'"><o:p></o:p></SPAN></P>
          <P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'">Each model is first differentiated by letters (up to two).<o:p></o:p></SPAN></P>
          <P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'"><o:p></o:p></SPAN></P>
          <P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'">Then by a number (up to three digits) to indicate variations within that model series.<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes"> </SPAN><o:p></o:p></SPAN></P>
          <P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'">In the case of use of three digits, the last two indicate the cabinet style/type.<o:p></o:p></SPAN></P>
          <P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'"><o:p></o:p></SPAN></P>
          <P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'">Certainly there are exceptions as earlier organs had identifying letters only.<o:p></o:p></SPAN></P>
          <P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'"><o:p></o:p></SPAN></P>
          <P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">Re above: <I style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">“The X models were the beginning of the non-tonewheel era.”<o:p></o:p>[/I]</SPAN></P>
          <P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><I style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"><o:p></o:p></SPAN>[/I]</P>
          <P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">X-66/77/XTP where all tonewheel organs with solid state electronics.<o:p></o:p></SPAN></P>
          <P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"><o:p></o:p></SPAN></P>
          <P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">Although Electronic/LSI models generally had named models such as the previously mentioned: <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" /><st1:place w:st="on"><st1:City w:st="on">Aurora</st1:City></st1:place>, Grandee, Colonnade, they were in addition “catalogued” by numbers. Model numbers, feature variations and cabinet styles were all numeric. Now there are exceptions such as the 810/820 and B-3000.<o:p></o:p></SPAN></P>
          <P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"><o:p></o:p></SPAN></P>
          <P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">Product ID recognition would have probably evolved as new models were introduced.<o:p></o:p></SPAN></P></SPAN></SPAN>
          Have: Hammond 340212 Elegante
          Had: Hammond T-311 and 333114 Colonnade
          Never will have: Laurens Hammond 350 w/ 2 - 751 Leslies

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: What is the meaning between all the Hammond model names?



            X77 was all tonewheel, based on the generator from the H series.</p>

            X66 has just 12 tonewheels, not used for producing sounds, but as a 'top octave generator' to produce 12 very stable frequencies for standard electronic organ electronics to produce all the sounds.</p>

            With 'real' Hammonds, X initially meant a pedestal type stand, as in X66, X77, XTP and TX500. Hammond Suzuki have used it for some time, starting with the XB series.</p>

            Andy</p>

            </p>
            It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

            New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

            Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha Genos, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
            Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
            Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
            Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: What is the meaning between all the Hammond model names?



              FWIW</P>


              The reason the C is more suitable for church as opposed to the B is the a lot of churchorganist are women. </P>


              The cabinet was not designed to just hide thefeet.[:)]</P>

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: What is the meaning between all the Hammond model names?

                Well, most of this makes sense now how most models are just upgrades of the previous a,b,c,d models and the letter changed depending on the differences in shape and additional features. Here is where I saw it being referred to as bench with percussion http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RSMrQpm1Vv0. This guy is an organist for a church in Indiana but he may have been mistaken, becuase there aren't 3 percussive units and the other meaning makes more sense. Well then, I still wonder, what does XK stand for in the portable keyboards, and why did XK-2 come before 3, then 1 came last.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: What is the meaning between all the Hammond model names?



                  [quote user="jweber13"] Here is where I saw it being referred to as bench with percussion http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RSMrQpm1Vv0. This guy is an organist for a church in Indiana but he may have been mistaken. [/quote]</P>


                  OK, I see what he was getting at now. He's right in saying the "B" refers to that particular cabinet style with the 4 legs -- which *is* like a bench, I suppose, except I'm sure the Hammond Co. didn't actually name it B based on that. And he's also right in saying the "3" comes from the percussion, since adding percussion was the main change in spec between B2 and B3. It just comes out sounding a little funny if you state it baldly as "B3 stands for Bench plus 3 percussions."</P>


                  Really the important thing in all this alphabet soup is to realize that any of the early models will sound GREAT, especially anything with an A, B, or C in the name (there are others too -- see ME+ME's summary again -- but it's easier to just remember your ABCs!) It's all the same basic sound, just with these minor differences in features as have already been discussed. ...What it boils down to is, you can buy something like a CV for $300 - $400 (depending on your location), and have it sound just as good as any B3 that you'd have to pay 10x that amount for.</P>


                  TD</P>
                  Nobody loves me but my mother,
                  And she could be jivin' too...

                  --BB King

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: What is the meaning between all the Hammond model names?

                    I had an old Hammond Add-a-Sound synth that was monophonic. Is this part of the XK series?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: What is the meaning between all the Hammond model names?



                      [quote user="toasterDude"] He's right in saying the "B" refers to that particular cabinet style with the 4 legs -- which *is* like a bench, I suppose, except I'm sure the Hammond Co. didn't actually name it B based on that.[/quote]</P>


                      Quite right, considering that cabinet style started with the A. Also, in those days, the style was actually called Spinet style, after an 18th century instrument of that name. Not to be confused with the style of the much later M.</P>


                      [quote user="toasterDude"] Really the important thing in all this alphabet soup is to realize that any of the early models will sound GREAT, especially anything with an A, B, or C in the name (there are others too -- see ME+ME's summary again -- but it's easier to just remember your ABCs!) It's all the same basic sound, just with these minor differences in features as have already been discussed. ...What it boils down to is, you can buy something like a CV for $300 - $400 (depending on your location), and have it sound just as good as any B3 that you'd have to pay 10x that amount for.[/quote]</P>


                      A lot of us think the oldest models (anything before the -2s and -3s) actuallysound better than B-3s because the bass on the manuals goes all the way down and the lower pedal octave does not have the "benefit" of complex tonewheels. But they need something like a PR-40 tone cabinet to take advantage of all that bass.</P>
                      1937 Model E
                      PR-40 w/Accutronic Reverberation
                      Leslie 31-H
                      Schulmerich ChimeATron

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: What is the meaning between all the Hammond model names?



                        [quote user="jweber13"]Well then, I still wonder, what does XK stand
                        for in the portable keyboards, and why did XK-2 come before 3, then 1
                        came last.[/quote]</p>

                        It doesn't stand for anything. Like I said,
                        Ham-Suz have used X in the number for years. The XK2 came before the
                        XK3, and the XK1 is very much a cut down version of the 3.</p>

                        [quote user="FourCasters"]I had an old Hammond Add-a-Sound synth that was monophonic. Is this part of the XK series?
                        [/quote]</p>

                        Er, that would be a no![:)]
                        </p>
                        It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

                        New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

                        Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha Genos, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
                        Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
                        Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
                        Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: What is the meaning between all the Hammond model names?

                          http://theatreorgans.com/hammond/faq/all_hammondss.html I have no affiliation with this company, but this is a very well compiled list of Hammond models describing features and years produced. It's well worth a look....
                          1963 C-3 147 Leslie
                          1972 X-77GT 2 - 77P Leslie
                          Kurzweil K 2000

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: What is the meaning between all the Hammond model names?

                            Model E&amp;Me, isn't the 31H supposed to have better bass response too? (At least with the original field coil woofer.) That rig must sound killer with both the Leslie and PR40 to handle the E's bass.
                            1955 M3 (in good hands!)
                            1962 A100
                            1942 BC
                            too many other keyboards...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: What is the meaning between all the Hammond model names?



                              Not a bad list but skimps on non tonewheel instruments (probably because they have no interest in them). A few errors here and there - notably the spinet K100, which is NOTHING like an L! </p>

                              I'll give it 8/10....[;)]
                              </p>
                              It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

                              New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

                              Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha Genos, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
                              Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
                              Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
                              Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X