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  • Leslie Speaker Volume



    Hello everyone! Today I was practicing my guitar through the leslie. I was playing loud but not super loud. There were a couple of ear pinching notes, but that was just frequency , not volume. But, when I played plugged my organ back into the leslie, I noticed a slight drop in volume of the treble driver (or this could be a slight increase of bass volume driver). So my question is..................Is it possible to <u>very</u> partially burn out the treble driver? What are signs of a failing treble driver? Now, my treble sounds nice and clear, only a slight drop in volume. So what does everyone think is the problem?</p>

    </p>

    By the way, the treble driver has a 30 watt amp...and I have one of those road ready leslies, with a supposedly more heavy duty treble driver...
    </p>

  • #2
    Re: Leslie Speaker Volume



    haha.. maybe after some 'ear pinching notes'... you burnt out your ear a little haha :)... </p>

    it is possible to do partial damage to a driver... although, the guitar and a organ sound very different though a leslie... it really might just be your ears needing time to become accustom to the organ sound again... just a thought...
    </p>

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    • #3
      Re: Leslie Speaker Volume



      We need more details on your setup. What model Leslie is it? Sounds like probably one of the solid state or "Pro Line" models since you referred to the treble driver having its own amp. Also, how was your guitar connected to the Leslie? Through a preamp pedal? Finally how is your organ connected? More info needed!</P>


      TD</P>
      Nobody loves me but my mother,
      And she could be jivin' too...

      --BB King

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Leslie Speaker Volume



        hahaha! I must say, that was a good one, soundengg!!</p>

        OK, my set up..... </p>

        </p>

        I have a Hammond M3, hooked up to a Leslie 900 (pro line, solid state), via a Trek II Uc1A preamp. I installed a quarter inch out in the hammond, to connect it to the preamp. The guitar was plugged in through the preamp.
        </p>

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        • #5
          Re: Leslie Speaker Volume

          [quote user="LeslieSpeaker"]


          hahaha! I must say, that was a good one, soundengg!!</P>


          [/quote]</P>


          I think he wasexactly correct.</P>


          H101</P>

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Leslie Speaker Volume



            I don't see how you could've hurt the 900 with a guitar unless you really cranked the Trek preamp - and you said you weren't playing at high volume. In any case all other things being equal, I'd think the line out from the Hammond would be a much hotter signal, and therefore you'd be more likely to blow the Leslie driver with the M3, than with a guitar.</P>


            The other possibility is that something in the crossover may have given out, possibly. If you're up to it you could do voltage checks on the crossover and compare to the schematic. Or if you're not that worried about it, you can always just up the volume on the treble amp a little to compensate.</P>


            anyway good luck with it-</P>


            TD</P>
            Nobody loves me but my mother,
            And she could be jivin' too...

            --BB King

            Comment

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