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    A good model?

    If one were to look for a good used Hammond console, which models would be more desirable? Those with tone wheel generators & standard electronic components or newer with transistors & leslies? Many years ago I had a lot of fun with an H-112 but know nothing about the history of Hammond models. Back then I lusted for, but could not afford a Hammond Concorde. Were these dependable? Would appreciate any & all opinions & info.
    Thanks, Ed

    #2
    What do you plan to use it for?

    I would personally probably select the following in order of preference -- B3, RT3, C3, A100, G, H100, X77, B2, C2, BCV, BC, D, B, A

    Although, I might prefer a Northern Hammond BC with a Trek II percussion unit above the H100, since it would be Canadian made (50 miles away).

    ... that said, the likelihood of me owning a console is small. I have a hard enough time getting my spinet models up and down stairs.

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      #3
      Wes's models are all tonewheel models. You are right the Concordes & later had a more extensive range of sounds. Unfortunately the early concordes had connections problems called "LSI disease" requiring frequent connector reseating to burn off the oxygen. The 1975 ish cases were laughably flimsy, also. Later models like the Monarch, Aurora, and Elegante had the extensive list of sounds but better build quality. All of these later models require connector maintenance, and anything >30 years old, even an H100 or X77, will require replacement of 20-100 electrolytic capacitors to sound as if new. Any of these later named models have custom IC's in them that, when they go bad, can only be supplied from another organ.
      One desirable model only for the person living on the first floor, with wide doors, is the X66. These had a larger selection of sounds than the H100 but had better connectors than the concorde. they had 330 capacitors that will need replaced, however. The X66 and X77 came with accessory leslies. Most of the later named models had a little leslie built in. I've seen them in unrestored condition as low as $600 with leslie.
      I'm quite happy with my H100's but being a tinker, am looking at extending the selection of preset sounds, extending the selection of attack sounds, and perhaps adding sawtooth waves, white noise, and filters to the tone generation pallette . The X66, aurora, elegante, and other high end named models had sawtooth waves and filters built in as well as the sine wave generation that traditional Hammonds had up to the H100 and X77.
      city Hammond H-182 organ (2 ea),A100,10-82 TC, Wurlitzer 4500, Schober Recital Organ, Steinway 40" console , Sohmer 39" pianos, Ensoniq EPS, ; country Hammond H112

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        #4
        I was expecting to see a pic of Morgan Fairchild...or similar somewhere on this thread. Can the newer, say later than 1975 high end models, such as the aurora, elegante, etc sound like a tone wheel generator Hammond console ?
        Now: 1961 Hammond Extravoice F 100 , 1964 Hammond M 102, 1964 Leslie 125, Roland U20,
        1959 Jensen BF-100 Cabinet w/ 12" 2-way coaxial speaker H223F (cork sniffer worthy)

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          #5
          Without purposefully coming off like an elitist dick, can anyone tell me why one would put up with a vintage console organ that was *not* a tonewheel model?

          The home-user keyboards of today make better noises of just about every kind except tonewheel organs, IMO. If you like the auto-play stuff, you can do amazing things with many of Yamaha's relatively inexpensive offerings, and I'm sure other vendors too. If you like non-organ sounds, ditto. You can even get AGO pedal boards with modern stuff in them. Stop by a music store an dig into a high-end Yamaha PSR, a DGX 630, something like that. And you can take them to gigs!

          Wes

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            #6
            Originally posted by Wes View Post
            Without purposefully coming off like an elitist dick, can anyone tell me why one would put up with a vintage console organ that was *not* a tonewheel model?

            Even though you came off like an elitist dick, although not done purposely, I can answer that.


            JUST KIDDING WES !!! I would put up with a vintage console that was *not* a tonewhel model if the Seller was willing to trade one for a wall hanging Budweiser Natural Beer sign that has a fluorescent bulb in it, that you bought at a garage sale for five dollars, and he was willing to deliver the organ for no additional cost. I'd do the trade.
            Now: 1961 Hammond Extravoice F 100 , 1964 Hammond M 102, 1964 Leslie 125, Roland U20,
            1959 Jensen BF-100 Cabinet w/ 12" 2-way coaxial speaker H223F (cork sniffer worthy)

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              #7
              I've fixed one sixties console and have another on the upswing. How many Yamahas or Rolands have you restored? How many are restorable at 45 years?
              I'd take an Elegante for $50 if I didn't have to drive 250 miles to get it.
              As far as gigs, I have two fans now. The adolescent raccoons in the garage perk up their ears and watch when I sing or make faces at them. Sometimes they wink back. The J channel! All J every time. J and his majic refrigerator !!!
              city Hammond H-182 organ (2 ea),A100,10-82 TC, Wurlitzer 4500, Schober Recital Organ, Steinway 40" console , Sohmer 39" pianos, Ensoniq EPS, ; country Hammond H112

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                #8
                Like Ed I too wanted a Concorde but now I’m glad that I could not afford one at the time. First of this type where not reliable with connecter issues. The later 2300 series are more reliable. My favorite tonewheel organ is the X-77. I’d still would like a 346/350 series but both never reached production. Prototypes apparently were not fully functional.
                Originally posted by Jim Dep View Post
                Can the newer, say later than 1975 high end models, such as the aurora, elegante, etc sound like a tone wheel generator Hammond console ?
                No, not like a tonewheel but then LSI organs have voicing such as a String Ensemble (on second generation) not obtainable from a TWG. Never heard the word “clonewheel” used in their time (early 80's).

                I put up with a non-tonewheel organ for the all-in-one versatility of one with the added bonus of the rotary channel through a real Leslie. I’m not a Rock or Auto-chord type player.

                LSI models were built in Canada in Agincourt, Ontario. Had a tour of the plant arranged through the store I bought my organ from.
                Last edited by kkeys; 09-19-2012, 12:01 AM.
                Have: Hammond 340212 Elegante
                Had: Hammond T-311 and 333114 Colonnade
                Never will have: Laurens Hammond 350 w/ 2 - 751 Leslies

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                  #9
                  Ditto on Wes' post. The answer is; buy as much console as you can afford!
                  '60 A-100, Neo Ventilator, Kurzweil PC1x, Yamaha Clavinova, GSI/VB3, Reaper daw, Kontakt 5, 1907 Knabe upright. Formerly owned Rhodes Mark I.

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