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  • A100 power connections?

    Hi guys,

    I was thinking about making a A100 lighter for gigs. So removing the internal speakers, power amplifier and reverb tank+amplifier. I only faced a problem in my head. How would deliver power to the AO-28 preamp and TG without the poweramplifier? Anyone did this or has any suggestions?

    Much love
    Boye

  • #2
    you will not remove enough weight to make it worthwhile unless the organ is in tough shape, it is the balance of organs that is the biggest issue as they are top heavy, especially tone wheel organs.
    My 2 cents only
    Whttle an L100 down...........no problemo
    1956 M3, 51 Leslie Young Chang spinet, Korg Krome and Kronos

    Comment


    • #3
      thanks for your response!
      the thing is I would like to make an A100, B3 like. so remove the frontpanel wich the speakers are mounted on, emtpy out the lower section of the organ and only use the AO-28 preamp just like a B3. If it takes a lot of time and experience to make an A100, B3 like, I think i would go for the option to saw the organ horizontal in 2 picies wich I did with my l122. But I am pretty curious on how you can deliver power to the TG and AO-28 without the power amp. How is that done in a B3?

      Comment


      • #4
        Please, please, please, do not saw an A100 in half! This will end up being a mess for a number of reasons, one being the fact that the preamp hangs down from the shelf in the A100.

        I prepared an A100 for gigging for a customer last year. It had already had the speakers and amps removed by the previous owner. You can wire a power cord directly into the AC line box on the tone generator. I drilled a hole in the shelf just large enough for the cord and installed hardware under the shelf around which he could wrap the cord when not in use.

        You'll also need to install some sort of bracket to mount a Leslie output socket, assuming you're using one. Tonewheel General sells one that works.

        I also obtained and reinstalled a missing box around the expression pedal. Why? I consulted with some Hammond techs who've been doing this longer than I have, and they warned that in gig situations, it's easy for someone to kick tubes out of the preamp if that box isn't there, due to the A100 preamp mounting. I also made a back panel that provides the preamp with some protection from the other side.

        The speaker baffle helps add strength to the whole cabinet. If you look carefully, the side panels of the A100 case are not that thick. The baffle makes the whole thing more solid, which is important for gigging--unless you want it to fall apart. B3s used for gigging tend eventually to fall apart, and the legs have to be repaired with added bracing.

        Also, be aware that the pedal switch assembly in an A100 is only held in place by two screws and a couple of wood blocks. It's easy to have it "run aground" in the middle while moving it and rip it loose.

        With digital clones as good as they are these days, I really see no compelling reason to gig with a full-sized Hammond unless you have the capacity to move the whole thing. I have some customers who do, and it works for them. However, once you've chopped an existing organ--and no more are being built to replace them--you've significantly reduced its value without really making it that much more portable. I owned a chop for years, and there's no way to make them easy to move. Most of the weight is in the manuals and the tone generator, and you can't get rid of those. In fact, I think it's often easier to move a full-sized organ on a pair of Roll-Or-Karis than it is to move a chop.
        I'm David. 'Dave' is someone else's name.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by boye View Post
          Hi guys,

          I was thinking about making a A100 lighter for gigs. So removing the internal speakers, power amplifier and reverb tank+amplifier. I only faced a problem in my head. How would deliver power to the AO-28 preamp and TG without the poweramplifier? Anyone did this or has any suggestions?

          Much love
          Boye

          I think, "Semi-chop" is the best chop, if any, for an A100, yet easy done as this one for S.Winwood's:


          You supply power and all output wiring as it is on the B3(google B3 service manual) In fact it looks fully reversible unlike the cut. There won't be loud screams, just disassembling.

          Also member SweetPete has developed a simple and effective one-men technic of moving even a Concert Model E.
          I hope this helps,
          Cheers,

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by David Anderson View Post
            Please, please, please, do not saw an A100 in half! This will end up being a mess for a number of reasons, one being the fact that the preamp hangs down from the shelf in the A100.

            I prepared an A100 for gigging for a customer last year. It had already had the speakers and amps removed by the previous owner. You can wire a power cord directly into the AC line box on the tone generator. I drilled a hole in the shelf just large enough for the cord and installed hardware under the shelf around which he could wrap the cord when not in use.

            You'll also need to install some sort of bracket to mount a Leslie output socket, assuming you're using one. Tonewheel General sells one that works.

            I also obtained and reinstalled a missing box around the expression pedal. Why? I consulted with some Hammond techs who've been doing this longer than I have, and they warned that in gig situations, it's easy for someone to kick tubes out of the preamp if that box isn't there, due to the A100 preamp mounting. I also made a back panel that provides the preamp with some protection from the other side.

            The speaker baffle helps add strength to the whole cabinet. If you look carefully, the side panels of the A100 case are not that thick. The baffle makes the whole thing more solid, which is important for gigging--unless you want it to fall apart. B3s used for gigging tend eventually to fall apart, and the legs have to be repaired with added bracing.

            Also, be aware that the pedal switch assembly in an A100 is only held in place by two screws and a couple of wood blocks. It's easy to have it "run aground" in the middle while moving it and rip it loose.

            With digital clones as good as they are these days, I really see no compelling reason to gig with a full-sized Hammond unless you have the capacity to move the whole thing. I have some customers who do, and it works for them. However, once you've chopped an existing organ--and no more are being built to replace them--you've significantly reduced its value without really making it that much more portable. I owned a chop for years, and there's no way to make them easy to move. Most of the weight is in the manuals and the tone generator, and you can't get rid of those. In fact, I think it's often easier to move a full-sized organ on a pair of Roll-Or-Karis than it is to move a chop.

            Thanks for all your kind responses!

            David,
            I wont saw the organ in 2 pieces! i pormise (;. So if i wire up an AC cord to the AC linebox on the TG it would also deliver power to the AO-28?

            For the speaker baffle I was thinking about strengthening the side panels with some extra wood in the inside of the organ. or maybe put a transom in the middle of the organ next to the expression pedal.

            thank you very much voor your explicit anwser!

            much love
            boye

            - - - Updated - - -

            Originally posted by blhristov View Post
            I think, "Semi-chop" is the best chop, if any, for an A100, yet easy done as this one for S.Winwood's:

            [ATTACH=CONFIG]13189[/ATTACH]
            You supply power and all output wiring as it is on the B3(google B3 service manual) In fact it looks fully reversible unlike the cut. There won't be loud screams, just disassembling.

            Also member SweetPete has developed a simple and effective one-men technic of moving even a Concert Model E.
            I hope this helps,
            Cheers,
            blhristov,
            Actually that was what i had in mind! pretty cool! and indeed with that semi chop you can bring the organ back to its original state.
            I would be nice to add some protection for the AO-28, maybe put some sort of case over it with some ventilation holes.

            much love
            boye

            Comment


            • #7
              I would personally recommend using a fan in addition to holes if you are going to put a box over it. Volume matters, and I doubt either of us can do the engineering math to determine if a series of holes in a small enclosure will have sufficient convection to draw cool air where it is needed to keep temperatures low where necessary. The necessities in my mind are capacitor temperatures (affects lifetime), resistor temperature (affects ability to handle load) and wood temperature (must stay well below ignition).

              The power amp in my L111 is in an enclosure with lots of gaps, a 23 CFM fan and about 4 cubic feet of air. It will still warm the outside of the half-inch wood cover to about 100 degrees F after it's been on for a couple of hours.

              Wes

              Comment


              • #8
                People who know Hammond organs have already 'weighed in' on this thread. Whenever I see a 'wanna B' A100 I just shake my head.Who are you kidding? Not me,for sure.
                A100 is the best of the best,and only when COMPLETE in my opinion.

                Chops were invented by drummers and guitarists that wanted the keyboardist to have less 'schmoozing the women' time before and after gigs........ I only have 47 years of pro
                experience to base my decisions on.
                Attached Files

                Comment


                • #9
                  is that an old u-haul ramp?
                  small motor cycle lift?

                  BRILLIANT.
                  -- more playing time B-), less restoration/rehab time :-B lol, bwaaahahaaaahahaha

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    7' construction scaffolding section,with 3/8" fir ply riveted on.Twenty years of use.
                    See the holes in the bumper step? See the rung holders on the scaffold?
                    Notice the offset screws on the load picture.The jack has compensated the angle of the
                    roadside......I shot these pictures while unloading NYE gig solo, I'm 60..........that A100
                    has many stories,and gig patina.
                    Attached Files

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Yep, that A100 rig loads even better than my split L111 - which loads pretty damn good. Once I have the scratch together, I intend to do something similar....although stairs would still be a challenge. The hardest part of moving my current rig is getting the damn thing out of the house when the back yard is covered in snow.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Snowing as we speak in Vancouver. Days like today separate the couriers from the musicians......just like a ski resort business picks up in snowy weather......LOL.
                        Heated dry storage,24/7/365. Winter tires,chains whatever.Shovel,pieces of carpet,ice melter and kitty litter.....the Coquihalla Hwy 5 has been closed frequently
                        for avalanche control.......
                        The most important thing is safety.In driving and in moving gear.We are issued one back each at birth.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Great that you shared your moving tech tips again.

                          Cheers,

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Just for the Halibut -- here's my rig in the van:

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                            and on stage:

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                            Man, I could use a SweetPete-mobile. Most of the PA speakers travel with my bandmates.

                            Wes

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Wes View Post
                              Just for the Halibut -- here's my rig in the van:

                              [ATTACH=CONFIG]13234[/ATTACH]
                              [ATTACH=CONFIG]13235[/ATTACH]
                              [ATTACH=CONFIG]13236[/ATTACH]

                              and on stage:

                              [ATTACH=CONFIG]13233[/ATTACH]

                              Man, I could use a SweetPete-mobile. Most of the PA speakers travel with my bandmates.

                              Wes
                              Even though I rag on those who 'chop',I don't mind a 'split'.It still works and operates and looks like an organ.Fine by me.
                              A lot of 'B3' type cabinets always make me chuckle.Everyone is trying to make the 'Boyd Coddington' chop.......LOL

                              Great job on your logistics Wes.That 760 looks cool too.Willing to bet that rig rips quite well.Nothing 'rocks' like an L100 for
                              old prog rock,and 'Time Of The Season' is an L100.Love the second harmonic perc on an L100,stock.

                              If and when you get out here,we'll have my rig 'in' and 'on' and 'ready' in 20 minutes.I'll buy the beer too.

                              One year at Armstrong Fair,where this pic is 'near'.....Bruce Miller was our guest.He has written hits for Reba McIntyre,Dixie Chix,Valdy,in fact he wrote the McGarrigle sisters 'Anna Marie'.......also wrote for Rascal Flatts.I know it sounds like I'm 'not a fan' of country music.That is not the case.Maureen and I were in row 2 at The Orpheum for Alison Krause/Union Station.....I just don't go for the most of it though.

                              I live in Vancouver,and love to decompress out in the Okanagan.
                              Attached Files

                              Comment

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