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Recording a Hammond A-100 in the bathroom hallway

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  • Recording a Hammond A-100 in the bathroom hallway

    Nothing earth shattering, just a fun little behind the scenes clip from yesterday's recording session. The video says it all haha.
    https://youtu.be/GmpB4VWZEdU
    Watch me make a fool of myself on YouTube
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFr...rf5oknDGT7dDLg

  • #2
    Brought a smile.....Thanks
    '53 Hammond C2, '59 Leslie 45 w/2 speed conversion, Korg M3, Kawai GE-1 SE, Guitars: Martin, Breedlove, Takaminie

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Hillbilly View Post
      Brought a smile.....Thanks
      Glad you got a kick out of it :P
      At least nobody flushed during the take.
      Watch me make a fool of myself on YouTube
      https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFr...rf5oknDGT7dDLg

      Comment


      • #4
        I guess that studio has never heard of Altiverb....
        1st born: 1958 B3 & 1964 Leslie 122
        Most Proud of: 1938 Concert Model E paired w/ 1948 Leslie 31A & Vibratone (Leslie) 30A (c.1942)
        Daily Workhorse: 3 Manual Rodgers running Hauptwerk 4.2
        New Kid on the Block: Hammond Novachord (year not determined yet)

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by JoeyB3 View Post
          I guess that studio has never heard of Altiverb....
          :->

          Or a good sampled Hammond sound for that matter ;-)

          Before going in, we (the singer, band, engineer & producer) came to an agreement that we'd keep things as primitive as possible. The decision wasn't based on any delusions of sonic superiority, but we just wanted to make the most creative environment possible. I gotta say it seemed to work. An otherwise routine, uninspired, boring session turned into a really fun time, and more than 1 song got completely overhauled into something very different.

          Even just the use of a real A100, Rhodes Suitcase and acoustic piano brought a lot of inspiration. I think a lot of us (myself especially) have gotten so comfortable with technology that the sudden introduction of lo-tech recording techniques presents a real novelty. Hmm, maybe next recording we'll try paper cups on a string.
          Watch me make a fool of myself on YouTube
          https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFr...rf5oknDGT7dDLg

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          • #6
            Studio guy needs to buy a long leslie cord. Dunno how you can be creative without being to like, move and dance and so on.

            Hey, if you want another low-tech trick to improve your feel? Take the click-track machine and throw it off the balcony.

            Wes

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Wes View Post
              Hey, if you want another low-tech trick to improve your feel? Take the click-track machine and throw it off the balcony.

              Wes


              Oh man, where were you when the band had an argument over that exact point!!! I hate clicks. They sap the life out of everything. Unfortunately I totally lost that argument.

              Originally posted by Wes View Post
              Studio guy needs to buy a long leslie cord. Dunno how you can be creative without being to like, move and dance and so on.
              Another total agreement.
              I want to be this guy:
              https://facebook.com/story.php?story...;id=7530846195
              Watch me make a fool of myself on YouTube
              https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFr...rf5oknDGT7dDLg

              Comment


              • #8
                ^ Oops link got messed up. Try this:

                Watch me make a fool of myself on YouTube
                https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFr...rf5oknDGT7dDLg

                Comment


                • #9
                  Studio guys want click tracks because it makes it easy for them to cut and paste from one part of the song to another. Then they can rack up tons of billable hours in ProTools without having to put up with musicians in the studio.

                  That's great if the studio guy is the guy making the tracks. But normally it's the bands making the tracks. Tracks always feel better when people play music with each other. If you need studio guy to massage your track for hours to sound like a song, then you need to go home and learn how to play your instrument before hiring the studio. If he needs to re-arrange your track after it's recorded, you need to focus on your songwriting. If your drummer can't keep time, I guess you could give HIM a click, but I'd just rather play with a better drummer. I hate clicks. They distract me (drum machines aren't so bad). The only thing I hate more than clicks is assinine producers who want you to play your part, solo, to a click. So can he can cut and paste it together into the most bland piece of blah you've ever heard. I'm never falling for that one again, I'm too old now. I wonder what Pete's take on clicks is. He's sure done his share of recording. I haven't done that much. I suppose I will have to learn how to play nice with a click someday, if I'm to get any more session work.

                  I agree re. that keys player. I especially like the backing vocalists.

                  Wes

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Wes View Post
                    Tracks always feel better when people play music with each other. If you need studio guy to massage your track for hours to sound like a song, then you need to go home and learn how to play your instrument before hiring the studio. If he needs to re-arrange your track after it's recorded, you need to focus on your songwriting. If your drummer can't keep time, I guess you could give HIM a click, but I'd just rather play with a better drummer. I hate clicks. They distract me (drum machines aren't so bad).
                    Wes
                    My experience with click tracks is very simple....If you're playing with a rock solid bassist and drummer, it's almost a non-issue and I was never adverse to it. In fact, it was those types of solid musicians who would relate to the click as just another member in the band.

                    When however, I was NOT playing with a bassist and drummer who could lock on to one, it was a total nightmare. At that point, it's nothing more than a distraction and a disrupter of the music and the session.
                    1st born: 1958 B3 & 1964 Leslie 122
                    Most Proud of: 1938 Concert Model E paired w/ 1948 Leslie 31A & Vibratone (Leslie) 30A (c.1942)
                    Daily Workhorse: 3 Manual Rodgers running Hauptwerk 4.2
                    New Kid on the Block: Hammond Novachord (year not determined yet)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Great observation, Joey. This really could be the source of my intense discomfort with them.

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                      • #12
                        Yup, the engineer even admitted that: her prefers a click so he can cut & paste parts easily. But I agree with you guys, if the band is solid enough, there shouldn't be any need for cutting & pasting as that only serves to make the song sound like an assembly line.

                        I do believe that slight tempo variations are what make a song feel human, just like dynamics in volume. I love to bring up the example of John Bonham's "In Through the Out Door" drum sessions which you can download here:
                        http://www.saladrecords.com/bonhamfiles.htm

                        Just for laughs I imported track 23 "Fool in the Rain" into my recording software and tried to sync up the tempo. Bonzo was all over the place but it's absolutely perfect. Check out this screen shot of the tempo changes. He starts at 131 and slows down as far as 129, then picks it up to 135 before ending basically where he started, at 131. Within these tempo changes, he often jumps ahead or lags the beat for a snare or kick, and when you hear it in context you realize this puts a tremendous amount of expression into the song.
                        Click image for larger version

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                        I'm sure that would be unheard of today. I doubt the studio engineer would go to the trouble to sync the software's tempo to the performance (in this case 22 tempo changes). The engineer would probably tell the drummer to do it again with a click. And maybe that's why there aren't a whole lot of John Bonhams in the music scene today. Not that there isn't a ton of talent, but I bet studio technology tends to beat the subtle human feel out of the recording for the convenience of working inside the box.

                        Of course the problem isn't the studio engineer. The problem is the artist who doesn't insist on keeping it real.

                        Well there's my spiel. I feel better now.
                        Watch me make a fool of myself on YouTube
                        https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFr...rf5oknDGT7dDLg

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          There are many examples of varying tempi in rock tunes...my favorite of all time is in ELP's Karn Evil. After the instrumental section, there is a drum solo and then the beginning of a verse on top ("Soon the gypsy queen..."). Carl Palmer's tempo gets ridiculous in this spot, only to slow down to what seems like a crawl when the band comes back in for the 2nd half of the verse. I think it's hilarious!

                          Hey...Steely Dan used clicks. You ain't accusing them of not having a groove. At then end of the day it comes down to musicianship, regardless of what a producer/engineer throws at you.
                          1st born: 1958 B3 & 1964 Leslie 122
                          Most Proud of: 1938 Concert Model E paired w/ 1948 Leslie 31A & Vibratone (Leslie) 30A (c.1942)
                          Daily Workhorse: 3 Manual Rodgers running Hauptwerk 4.2
                          New Kid on the Block: Hammond Novachord (year not determined yet)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            What I find hilariously ironic in my rock band is that the drummer gets so locked into a tempo that he can't speed up when we want him to! We play Springsteen's "Born To Run", which starts slow, but feels like a dirge if the end is played at the start speed. Our solution has been to count it off a bit fast.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Wes View Post
                              We play Springsteen's "Born To Run", which starts slow, but feels like a dirge if the end is played at the start speed.
                              So it becomes, "Born to Crawl?" :devil:
                              1st born: 1958 B3 & 1964 Leslie 122
                              Most Proud of: 1938 Concert Model E paired w/ 1948 Leslie 31A & Vibratone (Leslie) 30A (c.1942)
                              Daily Workhorse: 3 Manual Rodgers running Hauptwerk 4.2
                              New Kid on the Block: Hammond Novachord (year not determined yet)

                              Comment

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