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Need help!!! Tones missing on my BC (Northern Hammond)

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  • Need help!!! Tones missing on my BC (Northern Hammond)

    Hello all,

    I need some help. Here are the symptoms.

    1.) Missing several tones on the lower manual. For instance, drawbars 9 and 8 are missing on 5 out of 12 keys on the highest octave on the lower manual.

    2.) If the tone is missing on the "B" preset, the same tone is missing on the "Bb" preset

    3.) If the tone is present on the "B" preset, the tone is present on the "Bb" preset

    4.) All drawbars (tones) on all keys on both presets on the upper manual work

    The main TG has been recapped.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated. In the mean time, I will scour this forum for any similar situation.

  • #2
    So after checking several threads from others with a similar issue, I found the problem. It was too random to suggest the TG and too vast to suggest a drawbar wire or key contact. Literally, at minimum, 75 to 100 tones missing on the 4 highest octaves on the lower manual.

    So as one of the experts in one of those threads suggested, after eliminating the TG, check the wiring between the manual and the TG. That's what it is. There are at least 20 wires between the lower manual and the upper manual that were broken off at the solder joint. These wires are single strand wire so they would be susceptible to being broken if the upper manual is lifted or tilted up and down.

    I will leave this thread up as there is a solution to a problem that someone in the future may find useful.

    Thanks

    Comment


    • #3
      Dear Fellow Canuck,

      Great thread, eh?

      It is amazing how often we ask for help and in the process find the answer before the gang weighs in. This is a useful piece of information, as, on rare occasions, I have had to lift manuals up (for example, in installing a passive distortion unit, Profkon). So if these symptoms develop, I'll know where to look first.

      Thanks,

      Dave
      1955 B3, Leslie 21H and 147. Hammond A100 with weird Leslie 205. 1976 Rhodes. Wurlitzer 200A. Yamaha DX7/TX7. Korg M1. Yamaha C3 grand, 67 Tele blond neck, Les Paul Standard, PRS 24, Gibson classical electric, Breedlove acoustic electric, Strat, P Bass, Rogers drum kit, Roland TD 12 digital drums, Apollo quad, older blackfaced Fender Twin, other amps, mics and bits and pieces cluttering up the "studio."

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Tonewheel View Post
        Dear Fellow Canuck,

        Great thread, eh?

        It is amazing how often we ask for help and in the process find the answer before the gang weighs in. This is a useful piece of information, as, on rare occasions, I have had to lift manuals up (for example, in installing a passive distortion unit, Profkon). So if these symptoms develop, I'll know where to look first.

        Thanks,

        Dave
        Hey Dave,

        Yeah, the amount of knowledge AND the willingness to share that knowledge, is a rare combination. Have you ever tried to get a lick from a guitar player lol?

        I have been restoring my BC in my garage and have run into many situations where I am not stuck, but like to get a second opinion. Just google what I want and usually end up either on this forum or on one of the many videos on youtube. This guy ---> bobmann107... might as well be in my garage waiting to answer my questions lol. Thanks bob!!!

        Comment


        • #5
          Right.

          As a kid playing in R&B bands in Toronto, the core of the sound back then was usually a Hammond to fatten out the sound, and guys that could really pull drawbars. We usually carted around an M and Leslie, but I was amazed at the beauty of the B3, and when some guy could play pedals well, it stuck with me. But I never appreciated how old and iconic these units were even back then.

          I would imagine there is an A, B or C out there that "dies" every week or more often, because of mishandling, no access to the old Hammond techs, or sheer ignorance of the magnificence of the instrument. So this forum becomes a major influence in preserving them.

          The collective knowledge about the electromechanics here is outstanding. And then there are the refinishers!

          So, perching up on the bench, firing up the start and run motors, waiting for the Leslies to spool down, sensing the waterfall effect and hearing the chorus effect and Leslie in so many varieties of drawbar combos, tapping the B pedal (synced to the drummer's bass drum) while your left hand is blowing bass, is an experience that is indescribable. Slowly getting there in terms of comping and solo runs, but there is always so much more to learn.

          Our 86 year old Hammond tech who retired years ago could be bribed to work on my rig, but he has sold all his equipment. I have a young friend who has some of that equipment, has a degree in audio engineering, and loves to rebuild and recreate the old Fender amps. I gave him my printed copy of Hammond B3 and Leslie Tips, circuit diagrams, etc., and he is now becoming the expert in that area. Thank goodness. Because he's not afraid to solder where I would make a mess of it. And this forum provides ammo I can give him.

          So, a big shout-out to everyone here who is so patient with those who want to preserve and restore Hammonds!
          1955 B3, Leslie 21H and 147. Hammond A100 with weird Leslie 205. 1976 Rhodes. Wurlitzer 200A. Yamaha DX7/TX7. Korg M1. Yamaha C3 grand, 67 Tele blond neck, Les Paul Standard, PRS 24, Gibson classical electric, Breedlove acoustic electric, Strat, P Bass, Rogers drum kit, Roland TD 12 digital drums, Apollo quad, older blackfaced Fender Twin, other amps, mics and bits and pieces cluttering up the "studio."

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Tonewheel View Post
            Right.

            As a kid playing in R&B bands in Toronto, the core of the sound back then was usually a Hammond to fatten out the sound, and guys that could really pull drawbars. We usually carted around an M and Leslie, but I was amazed at the beauty of the B3, and when some guy could play pedals well, it stuck with me. But I never appreciated how old and iconic these units were even back then.

            I would imagine there is an A, B or C out there that "dies" every week or more often, because of mishandling, no access to the old Hammond techs, or sheer ignorance of the magnificence of the instrument. So this forum becomes a major influence in preserving them.

            The collective knowledge about the electromechanics here is outstanding. And then there are the refinishers!

            So, perching up on the bench, firing up the start and run motors, waiting for the Leslies to spool down, sensing the waterfall effect and hearing the chorus effect and Leslie in so many varieties of drawbar combos, tapping the B pedal (synced to the drummer's bass drum) while your left hand is blowing bass, is an experience that is indescribable. Slowly getting there in terms of comping and solo runs, but there is always so much more to learn.

            Our 86 year old Hammond tech who retired years ago could be bribed to work on my rig, but he has sold all his equipment. I have a young friend who has some of that equipment, has a degree in audio engineering, and loves to rebuild and recreate the old Fender amps. I gave him my printed copy of Hammond B3 and Leslie Tips, circuit diagrams, etc., and he is now becoming the expert in that area. Thank goodness. Because he's not afraid to solder where I would make a mess of it. And this forum provides ammo I can give him.

            So, a big shout-out to everyone here who is so patient with those who want to preserve and restore Hammonds!
            Damn that was well said and I could not agree more. There is something comforting about knowing that there is a serious community of music/electrical/furniture/all around screw driver guys keeping these instruments alive for the next generation. I often watch shows like American Pickers and wondered why the guy (host) got weepy eyed when he found an old Indian Motorcycle or some 100 year old Schwinn bicycle. Well I can now understand why he feels that way.

            The other thing that I have noticed about the the whole Hammond restoration wave is that it does not seem to be profit driven. Just people that love to see them run and hear them play.

            Comment


            • #7
              It's absolutely indescribable to have the sound of a Hammond and a Leslie at your fingertips. Like a violinist and a Stradivarius.
              Hammond A-102 ('63), Leslie 122 ('63), Leslie 120 + mod horns, Yamaha SY-77, Technics KN2000, Fender USA Precision Bass (2016), Crown Micro-Tech 1200 x2

              Comment


              • #8
                Well spoke.

                Here are 2 Canucks playing B3's with 2 Americans. Paul Shaeffer (please focus more on the playing than the verbiage), Lonnie Smith, Doug Riley (Toronto guy RIP) and Joey DeFrancesco.

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IdJeCjIwGFk
                1955 B3, Leslie 21H and 147. Hammond A100 with weird Leslie 205. 1976 Rhodes. Wurlitzer 200A. Yamaha DX7/TX7. Korg M1. Yamaha C3 grand, 67 Tele blond neck, Les Paul Standard, PRS 24, Gibson classical electric, Breedlove acoustic electric, Strat, P Bass, Rogers drum kit, Roland TD 12 digital drums, Apollo quad, older blackfaced Fender Twin, other amps, mics and bits and pieces cluttering up the "studio."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Tonewheel View Post
                  Well spoke.

                  Here are 2 Canucks playing B3's with 2 Americans. Paul Shaeffer (please focus more on the playing than the verbiage), Lonnie Smith, Doug Riley (Toronto guy RIP) and Joey DeFrancesco.

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IdJeCjIwGFk
                  Awesome! Here's the rehearsal. Same thing minus the talking

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Right...but minus Joey D. Once he got there and the whole crowd was listening, they all kicked it up a few notches. Doug Riley has passed on, but his solo in the main performance was my favourite.
                    1955 B3, Leslie 21H and 147. Hammond A100 with weird Leslie 205. 1976 Rhodes. Wurlitzer 200A. Yamaha DX7/TX7. Korg M1. Yamaha C3 grand, 67 Tele blond neck, Les Paul Standard, PRS 24, Gibson classical electric, Breedlove acoustic electric, Strat, P Bass, Rogers drum kit, Roland TD 12 digital drums, Apollo quad, older blackfaced Fender Twin, other amps, mics and bits and pieces cluttering up the "studio."

                    Comment

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