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E100 tone wheel shaft and clutch spring question

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    E100 tone wheel shaft and clutch spring question

    The organ has been running great for the last two weeks but now one of the tone wheel pairs started squealing today if you "looked at it wrong". FWIW, it is the pair closest to the motor and the rear of the instrument.

    It may just be that sufficient oil had not yet reached the inboard bearing, but I wanted to verify the following:

    1. Each of the two wheels are fixed upon their shaft by design

    2. There is but a single clutch spring that drives one of the wheels from the floating fiber 'driven' gear

    Great forum, thanks for the help!
    Tom in Tulsa

    Fooling with: 1969 E100, 1955 M3, 1963 M100, Leslie 720

    #2
    The driven gear is between the two tone wheels and there is a clutch spring on both sides of the gear, so two springs.

    Geo

    Comment


      #3
      But is that true for the E100 series generator? I've seen pics of the earlier styles like in a B3 which clearly have two rather large springs, but this one appears to use a single, and smaller, spring. Not that it really matters I suppose, I just wanted to be sure what I was potentially screwing with 8) Thanks!
      Tom in Tulsa

      Fooling with: 1969 E100, 1955 M3, 1963 M100, Leslie 720

      Comment


        #4
        Old topic but... Does anyone know when Hammond began to use only one spring in the clutch mechanism? I quickly checked out my photos of some early 70's A100 and C3 generators I've had and they all got one spring only. It also looks that in two spring design tonewheel mounting bush has larger diameter on center (spring) side.

        Click image for larger version

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        Last edited by valotus; 01-14-2020, 04:39 AM.

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          #5
          FWIW, my E100 is a '69 and I also have a '67 H100 which also has single springs.
          Tom in Tulsa

          Fooling with: 1969 E100, 1955 M3, 1963 M100, Leslie 720

          Comment


            #6
            Checked out '65 A-100 just arrived in my workshop, it has only one spring for a clutch. '60 A-100 at home, two springs.

            Looks like older design is prone to get bakelite gear stuck some way as it has much larger contact area between gear and tonewheel brass sleeve. Still I'm just wondering how it be possible at all, as the place between tonewheels should stay relatively dry. Gear is loose fitted on the shaft and tonewheels both sides are very tightly pressed on their place, but so that gear between has enough tolerance to spin freely.

            Comment


              #7
              I don't know how it does it, but gunk just somehow finds its way in there. It took several *vigorous* flushings with solvent spray to finally get all the goo out of my BC's clutches, but it was definitely worth it, sounds brand new! Or, I assume it does, I no longer know anyone who would have been alive when it was new 8)
              Tom in Tulsa

              Fooling with: 1969 E100, 1955 M3, 1963 M100, Leslie 720

              Comment


                #8
                There seems to be a lot of WD-40 blasting round here lately. I wonder how long that's been considered normal.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I can see using it in certain desperate situations if something is really jammed up, like maybe packing a gushing gunshot wound with coffee grounds. Back in a previous life I wound up junking a perfectly good Teletype because I didn't realize that WD40 had over a period of time glued most of the moving parts together! I just didn't know no better 8)
                  Tom in Tulsa

                  Fooling with: 1969 E100, 1955 M3, 1963 M100, Leslie 720

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