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  • BCV Questions

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    I'm replacing the main AC cord and the speaker cord that runs between the TGs and down the copper tubes. The old 6 conductor cord has the braided steel for the B+/grnd. Can I use the modern typed cord for this (non braided) or is it like that for a reason? I don't want to get it all back together and then find out it's picking up noise from the TGs.

    Other question. I found this thumb wheel bolt lying on the green felt behind the preset harness, Is this the old tremulant knob?

    Loving this old girl....
    BCV, C2, M3, C3
    HR40, 142, 760, 771
    Once upon a time I was a musician, now I just collect Hammonds!:->

  • #2
    Steel braided and shielded should remain as such. It is there for noise/hum/interference protection.
    Bolt could be original thumb screw for back panel The thread size and bolt length appear to fit the bill.
    1st born: 1958 B3 & 1964 Leslie 122
    Most Proud of: 1938 Concert Model E paired w/ 1948 Leslie 31A & Vibratone (Leslie) 30A (c.1942)
    Daily Workhorse: 3 Manual Rodgers running Hauptwerk 4.2
    New Kid on the Block: Hammond Novachord (year not determined yet)

    Comment


    • #3
      The low impedance audio wires (red/black) are insulated/shielded separate from the AC's and B+ wire.
      Easier to stick with the original. Hammond 5 wire (tone cab),or 6 wire(Leslie) with the shielded pair.

      You lucked out on the bolt.I think it will fit the back panel.Mine are missing.
      A100/251 A100/147 A102/222 B2/142 BV/147 BCV/145 M3/145 M102/145 M111/770 L101/760 T222/HL722 M111/770 no B3/C3!

      Comment


      • #4
        That is not a back panel bolt. Too big. As it turns out, I have one of those as well in my BC and have no idea where it goes. I actually found it on the floor of my truck after moving the organ.

        Anybody else care to venture a guess?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by BoaterCanuck View Post
          That is not a back panel bolt. Too big. As it turns out, I have one of those as well in my BC and have no idea where it goes. I actually found it on the floor of my truck after moving the organ.

          Anybody else care to venture a guess?
          Yes. it's too big for the back panel.
          BCV, C2, M3, C3
          HR40, 142, 760, 771
          Once upon a time I was a musician, now I just collect Hammonds!:->

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Jwolter View Post
            Yes. it's too big for the back panel.
            TG locking bolt? Mine doesn’t have any fitted and they’re different to the later organs.
            Hammond C3, M102, H112, XB3, XB5, X5, TTR-100
            Lowrey Heritage DSO-1, Yamaha E70
            Farfisa Compact Duo Mk2, Vox Continental 300, Gibson G201, Korg BX3 Mk1
            Leslie 122 x2, 145 x2, 910
            www.drawbardave.co.uk

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Jwolter View Post
              [ATTACH=CONFIG]30423[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]30424[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]30425[/ATTACH]

              I'm replacing the main AC cord and the speaker cord that runs between the TGs and down the copper tubes. The old 6 conductor cord has the braided steel for the B+/grnd. Can I use the modern typed cord for this (non braided) or is it like that for a reason? I don't want to get it all back together and then find out it's picking up noise from the TGs.

              Other question. I found this thumb wheel bolt lying on the green felt behind the preset harness, Is this the old tremulant knob?

              Loving this old girl....

              That bolt is from the pedal box.
              On those pedals that have a heel rest that bolt attaches the heel rest bracket to the base. Here you can see just the top of that screw.
              Click image for larger version

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ID:	606146 The "nut" underneath the board is about 1" square with a threaded hole in the center that keeps it from rotating. This allows the heel rest to be moved in and out and tightening the screw hohlds it in place.

              Bob
              In theory, there is no difference between theory and reality.
              In reality, there is.
              '54 C-2 & Pair of 122 Leslies
              H-324/Series 10 TC
              '35 Model A (Serial# 41) with a 21H
              Look at some of my rescues:
              https://www.flickr.com/photos/58226398@N03/albums

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Jwolter View Post
                I'm replacing the main AC cord and the speaker cord that runs between the TGs and down the copper tubes. The old 6 conductor cord has the braided steel for the B+/grnd. Can I use the modern typed cord for this (non braided) or is it like that for a reason? I don't want to get it all back together and then find out it's picking up noise from the TGs.
                Very old Hammond Tone Cabinet cables had braided (probably copper) shields around the B+ conductor, but they gave up on that approach around 1950 or so. I'd imagine that it was expensive, and it made terminating the cables a lot more difficult.

                No HTC or Leslie cable made nowadays has shielded coax B+. It makes little sense to worry about it for the short run inside the organ when you are also running a ~30' long cable between the organ and tone cabinet.

                The red/black conductors inside this old style of cable will often have insulation failure, causing them to short to one another, which causes the audio to drop out.

                You can use modern 6-conductor cable inside the organ or just any wire of the right gauge and color. With individual wires, you can twist the B+ and ground, red/black, and blue/grey as three pairs. I try to keep the colors original since it helps down the line. On this older-style hookup, yellow is ground, and brown is B+. Grey/blue wires should probably be 18ga; the others can be anything since they carry very little current. 20 or 22ga is fine.
                I'm David. 'Dave' is someone else's name.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Bobmann View Post
                  That bolt is from the pedal box.
                  On those pedals that have a heel rest that bolt attaches the heel rest bracket to the base. Here you can see just the top of that screw.
                  [ATTACH=CONFIG]30430[/ATTACH] The "nut" underneath the board is about 1" square with a threaded hole in the center that keeps it from rotating. This allows the heel rest to be moved in and out and tightening the screw hohlds it in place.

                  Bob
                  Thanks Bob!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by David Anderson View Post
                    Very old Hammond Tone Cabinet cables had braided (probably copper) shields around the B+ conductor, but they gave up on that approach around 1950 or so. I'd imagine that it was expensive, and it made terminating the cables a lot more difficult.

                    No HTC or Leslie cable made nowadays has shielded coax B+. It makes little sense to worry about it for the short run inside the organ when you are also running a ~30' long cable between the organ and tone cabinet.

                    The red/black conductors inside this old style of cable will often have insulation failure, causing them to short to one another, which causes the audio to drop out.

                    You can use modern 6-conductor cable inside the organ or just any wire of the right gauge and color. With individual wires, you can twist the B+ and ground, red/black, and blue/grey as three pairs. I try to keep the colors original since it helps down the line. On this older-style hookup, yellow is ground, and brown is B+. Grey/blue wires should probably be 18ga; the others can be anything since they carry very little current. 20 or 22ga is fine.
                    I have just removed the original 6 conductor cable from my new BC and it was in terrible condition. I have one of Mikes Trek outlet boxes to fit this weekend which is prewired for the Leslie receptacle of your choice. It also has an IEC connection, also prewired.
                    Hammond C3, M102, H112, XB3, XB5, X5, TTR-100
                    Lowrey Heritage DSO-1, Yamaha E70
                    Farfisa Compact Duo Mk2, Vox Continental 300, Gibson G201, Korg BX3 Mk1
                    Leslie 122 x2, 145 x2, 910
                    www.drawbardave.co.uk

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Bobmann View Post
                      That bolt is from the pedal box.
                      On those pedals that have a heel rest that bolt attaches the heel rest bracket to the base. Here you can see just the top of that screw.
                      [ATTACH=CONFIG]30430[/ATTACH] The "nut" underneath the board is about 1" square with a threaded hole in the center that keeps it from rotating. This allows the heel rest to be moved in and out and tightening the screw hohlds it in place.

                      Bob
                      Thanks Bob!
                      I don't have the pedal board yet but that's on the list.

                      - - - Updated - - -

                      Originally posted by David Anderson View Post
                      Very old Hammond Tone Cabinet cables had braided (probably copper) shields around the B+ conductor, but they gave up on that approach around 1950 or so. I'd imagine that it was expensive, and it made terminating the cables a lot more difficult.

                      No HTC or Leslie cable made nowadays has shielded coax B+. It makes little sense to worry about it for the short run inside the organ when you are also running a ~30' long cable between the organ and tone cabinet.

                      The red/black conductors inside this old style of cable will often have insulation failure, causing them to short to one another, which causes the audio to drop out.

                      You can use modern 6-conductor cable inside the organ or just any wire of the right gauge and color. With individual wires, you can twist the B+ and ground, red/black, and blue/grey as three pairs. I try to keep the colors original since it helps down the line. On this older-style hookup, yellow is ground, and brown is B+. Grey/blue wires should probably be 18ga; the others can be anything since they carry very little current. 20 or 22ga is fine.
                      Thanks David,
                      I spent 2 hours after work pushing and pulling wires between the gennys. I broke the small braided strap that connects the two. Always something to challenge a person. No biggy.
                      BCV, C2, M3, C3
                      HR40, 142, 760, 771
                      Once upon a time I was a musician, now I just collect Hammonds!:->

                      Comment

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