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Hammond M-102 Run Motor bogs down on startup

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  • Hammond M-102 Run Motor bogs down on startup

    I have a Hammond M102 with a Leslie 122 that I purchased back in high school in 1967. Tried to keep it oiled throughout the years. When trying to start it up, after two years of not oiling, the start motor spun up fine but when I engaged the Run motor it slowed an stopped. After oiling and waiting a few days, weeks, there was no change. I noticed that the 'flywheel' to the run motor would not spin freely either after shutting it off. Removed the Run motor and inspected the vibrato scanner. looked inside and there was no gummed up oil. It spun freely. Looking at the start motor I saw that the thread had broken from the 'flywheel' where the axle gets it lubrication. Question; is the Run motor pinion supposed to spin freely when I try to manually spin it or does that require voltage. Is there anything else I can look for or test before reassembling/installing the Run motor back into the organ? Start motor engages/runs fine. Has the 1/4inch play on the scanner axle. I cleaned the ball joint that connects the Run motor to the scanner. That flywheel also was not sticking and had 1/4 inch play from side-to-side.

  • #2
    I finally resolved this issue by trial and error. The vibrato scanner was clean inside and spun freely when turning the axle. Yet there was still drag on the Run motor. I picked up another Run motor/Vibrato Scanner off of Ebay and when I received it I immediately noticed that there should be no drag at all when turning the axle pin that goes through the Run motor into the vibrato scanner. When purchasing one of these off of the internet be sure the oil wick threads are already in place and if you can, verify that the wiring harness has not been cut too short.

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    • #3
      I've freed up a number of gummed-up Run motors just by oiling the bearings on the motor on both side and turning the motor shaft by hand. The only time I've ever had to replace a Run motor was when the windings were bad.
      I'm David. 'Dave' is someone else's name.

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