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Hammond L100 Power Overload Issue???

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  • Hammond L100 Power Overload Issue???

    I have a Hammond L100 (L103 to be specific).

    It was working fine, no issues- Now, suddenly, every time I turn it on, it's apprently causing overloading/tripping the fuses of my home power, blacking out half my house, requiring me to reset the home's fusebox. This happens however the organ’s plugged in to the house AC (heavy duty power strip, Furman Power Conditioner etc.)

    Power-wise NOTHING in the house or any of the other studio gear has changed - The L100 being turned on is suddenly the ONLY thing causing the issue - As I said it was working fine... All signs point to power surge issue within the organ? Power amp? AC cord? Has the original power cord which is getting a little frayed… ???

    Any ideas on what could be causing this internal power surge from the organ????

    Thx!

  • #2
    one of the things that can fail immediately like this on my L100 is the motor that turns the TWG. or it is the capacitor fails that drives the motor. Less like the latter capacitor. it is likely The motor.
    Usually what can happen it the shaft of the motor will suddenly bind because the compressed spring on either end has exploded on the shaft - causing the shaft to have too much room and it binds up. It can be repaired if this is the issue. To check disconnect the electrical and remove the motor. Now you need to sight down both ends of the motor shaft and look to see if you can identify the compression spring on the shaft. If you can see some of the wire .......the end fitting has exploded.

    I wrote a long explanation on how to fix it on this sight you can search for it
    Practise the theory...realize the practical
    Hammonds L100 /A100 /B3 Leslie 147 and 122 Yamaha E352 Key board driven in OVATIONS 15" 40 watt power

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by BlueElectricBlue View Post
      I have a Hammond L100 (L103 to be specific).
      It was working fine, no issues- Now, suddenly, every time I turn it on, it's apprently causing overloading/tripping the fuses of my home power, blacking out half my house, requiring me to reset the home's fusebox. This happens however the organ’s plugged in to the house AC (heavy duty power strip, Furman Power Conditioner etc.)
      Any ideas on what could be causing this internal power surge from the organ????
      Hi BlueElectricBlue.
      I suspect that the motor run capacitor from the tonewheel generator has malfunctioned and therefore needs to be replaced with a new capacitor.

      If the capacitor is the original stock capacitor, then it is well overdue for replacement even if it has not yet died, because these very old capacitors tend to suddenly die without prior warning thus causing an AC mains electrical short circuit and the house fuse to switch off or to blow.

      As well as that, when the original stock motor run capacitors die, their cases often swell up and they let out very dangerous toxic PCB chemicals which make an oily mess of the surrounding area.

      Last year the original stock motor start capacitor from my 1972 Hammond XTP organ suddenly malfunctioned and died, and this caused the house fuse to switch off.
      A few seconds before the capacitor died, the pitch of the organ became unstable and then the house fuse switched off. The capacitor case became swollen and very hot to touch.

      When looking at the tonewheel generator from the back side of the organ, the motor run capacitor is the upright standing silver grey coloured rounded capacitor standing next to the green/blue coloured motor on the far left side of the tonewheel generator.

      A suitable replacement capacitor for American based Hammond organs operating on 117 volts / 60 Hz is a high AC mains voltage rated and X2 rated 2.5 uf ( 2.5 micro farad or 2.5 mfd ).

      The modern production capacitors are much smaller in size than the original stock capacitors so therefore you can use a small X2 rated high voltage 2.5 uf motor run capacitor intended for ceiling fans.

      In the countries which operate on 220/ 240 volts and 50 Hz AC mains, the motor run capacitor uf value needs to be 1.26 uf.
      All the best.
      Kon.
      Last edited by kziss; 10-02-2018, 07:37 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Ooh... I don't like the sound of the capacitor fail scenario!

        Tried to start it up one more time, same issuse with tripping the fuse box for my house... BUT, one new wrinkle, the plug from the L100 (plugged into a heavy duty power strip) visiably sparked when I hit the organ's "On" switch - wondering if sparks at the plug would be consistent with the failed capacitor theory or???

        Thx for your answers!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by BlueElectricBlue View Post
          Ooh... I don't like the sound of the capacitor fail scenario!

          Tried to start it up one more time, same issuse with tripping the fuse box for my house... BUT, one new wrinkle, the plug from the L100 (plugged into a heavy duty power strip) visiably sparked when I hit the organ's "On" switch - wondering if sparks at the plug would be consistent with the failed capacitor theory or???

          Thx for your answers!
          Hi BlueElectricBlue.
          On the American L-100 organs the 2.5 uf motor run capacitor is wired across the red and the black wires of the motor so therefore if the failed capacitor is shorted out, then this would cause the motor winding to be partially shorted out thus drawing abnormal current which would cause the fuse to trip as well as possibly causing the AC mains plug to spark when the organ is turned on.

          Pull the organ mains plug out of the AC mains power so that the organ is safely away from the AC mains.

          After this you can then test if the motor run capacitor is damaged by removing the dome shaped top cover of the capacitor.
          After removing the dome top cover you should short out the two terminals on top of the capacitor with a screwdriver just in case the capacitor has a high voltage charge stored in it. If there is a charge stored in the capacitor, then there will be a loud spark created when you short out the two terminals with the screwdriver.

          After discharging the capacitor, you should then unsolder the black and red wires which are connected to the terminals on top of the capacitor.

          After you have unsoldered the red and the black wires, you can then set a multimeter to the ohms setting and then connect the two probes of the multimeter to the two terminals on the capacitor.

          If you get a constant short circuit ( zero ohms or a very low ohms reading ) or any other constant ohms readings whatsoever , even when the multimeter is set to the higher ohms settings, then this means that the capacitor is either partially or fully shorted out and therefore needs to be replaced.

          With a properly functioning capacitor there is a brief resistance reading created when you first connect the multimeter probes across the capacitor terminals, but this ohms reading should quickly increase and then disappear within a few seconds and after this must not be any more ohms readings produced across the two terminals whilst the multimeter probes are connected to the capacitor terminals.

          As well as that, connect one probe of the multimeter to the metal case of the capacitor, and connect the other probe on to the capacitor terminals. If you get any ohms readings between the metal case and either of the terminals, then this means that there is an internal short between the capacitor innards and the metal case which means that the capacitor is faulty.

          If the capacitor case looks swollen or if there is a pungent bitter smelling oily liquid on the capacitor case and in the immediate area, then this also means that the capacitor is ruined.

          The oily liquid is the toxic PCB chemical which must be very carefully and thoroughly wiped up whilst wearing safety gloves and glasses, and then the wiped up residue and cloths need to be safely sealed and discarded because the PCB chemicals are poisonous and carcinogenic.

          If the motor run capacitor is OK, then another possible source of the short circuit could be the damaged primary winding of the power transformer of the organ amplifier, or perhaps the C315 0.0022 uf capacitor which is wired across the primary winding of the power transformer of the organ amplifier.

          All the best.
          Kon.

          Comment


          • #6
            Before removing anything, measure the resistance at the mains plug off the organ. That way, if you remove something you can check to see if that resistance has increased.

            If there is a definite spark upon discharge of a capacitor, there's no reason to remove it for testing. A capacitor that holds a charge cannot be shorted.

            Are there parts (amplifiers?) inside this organ that can be unplugged for isolation?

            The very first thing I do in these cases is inspect for damage caused by cat, rodent, or insects.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by KC9UDX View Post

              If there is a definite spark upon discharge of a capacitor, there's no reason to remove it for testing. A capacitor that holds a charge cannot be shorted.
              The run capacitor sometimes shorts from one of the terminals to its metal housing. This can occur while it still holds charge.
              Current organs: AV, M-3, A-100
              Current Leslies: 22H, 122, 770

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by enor View Post
                The run capacitor sometimes shorts from one of the terminals to its metal housing. This can occur while it still holds charge.
                Is the metal housing bonded to ground, or another circuit potential?

                If ground, does this organ even have a three prong mains plug?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by KC9UDX View Post
                  Is the metal housing bonded to ground, or another circuit potential?

                  If ground, does this organ even have a three prong mains plug?
                  Yes. Before suspecting any component you must have to start by the begining.

                  If you have not seen smoke or smelled bad, then it may not be so bad.

                  It may be an electrical problem but it may not come from the organ. This must be ensured by disconnecting everything connected to the organ.

                  If the cable is original, then the organ has a 2 Pole plug, but a ground fault can still cause the CB trip.

                  Follow the power circuit, looking for a short circuit or wire that touches the frame.
                  Procede from the mains plug, the line cord, connectors, switch, power panel,.....motor, transformer.

                  Then refer to manual and try to eliminate the fault by disconnecting circuits 1 by 1.
                  But, start by removing the 5U4. It is, with the motor run capacitor, another possible cause of problems.

                  JP

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Given its age, I would just change the capacitor and be done with it.
                    Hammond C3, M102, H112, XB3, XB5, X5, TTR-100
                    Lowrey Heritage DSO-1, Yamaha E70
                    Farfisa Compact Duo Mk2, Vox Continental 300, Gibson G201, Korg BX3 Mk1
                    Leslie 122 x2, 145 x2, 910
                    www.drawbardave.co.uk

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have recently had a similar problem with a blown capacitor on my L-122. The capacitor case definitely and there is a very strong smell and liquid on the capacitor case. Is it possible to replace the capacitor with a ceiling fan motor capacitor rated at 2uF 2.5uF?

                      Comment

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