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There must be a way to intergrate a leslie guitar pedal into the a102 speaker system.

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  • There must be a way to intergrate a leslie guitar pedal into the a102 speaker system.

    I know, a lot of you don't like the idea of using a pedal in place of a real leslie. But, I can't afford a real leslie at the moment. I have always ran a quarter jack out of the G G terminals and into a pedal and guitar amp. I just got this A102 and it's beautiful and sounds gorgeous. I love the speaker built in and that reverb! Is there a way to stick my pedal somewhere between?

  • #2
    Originally posted by jwb1231970 View Post
    I know, a lot of you don't like the idea of using a pedal in place of a real leslie. But, I can't afford a real leslie at the moment. I have always ran a quarter jack out of the G G terminals and into a pedal and guitar amp. I just got this A102 and it's beautiful and sounds gorgeous. I love the speaker built in and that reverb! Is there a way to stick my pedal somewhere between?
    Not really. The signal between preamp and power amp is symmetrical (balanced) and very high level - two things that guitar pedals can't handle.
    Current organs: AV, M-3, A-100
    Current Leslies: 22H, 122, 770

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    • #3
      Right. What you really need is either two more amplifier circuits, or at least a transformer before and after the pedal.

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      • #4
        Drill two holes in the preamp and mount two jacks of your choice. (1/4”, RCA etc.) Break the wire between pin 7 of V3 and the wiper of the tone control. Connect the wiper to one of the new jacks and it will be (output, send, to FX) Connect pin 7 to the other jack and it will be (input, return, from FX) For no FX a short cable between the two jacks or to be fancy, make one of the jacks switched so it automatically bypasses when the FX is unplugged. This is the easiest FX loop. It will be line level so your device may need an input volume control or pad. Any padding will need to be made up for for unity gain.

        Geo

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        • #5
          A Leslie simulator pedal gets the best sound from running stereo, the A102 amp is mono, so you're not going to get the full benefit sound wise.
          1962 A100, Leslie 145, Mini-vent., 1 Roland and 2 Yamaha pianos, Korg Micro X , Dave Smith MoPho, Nord Electro 3 with custom pedals and lower manual, plus assorted other stuff.

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          • #6
            Also you might find the internal speakers don’t have the frequency range you would expect from a Leslie - less highs.
            Hammond C3, M102, H112, XB3, XB5, X5, TTR-100
            Lowrey Heritage DSO-1, Yamaha E70
            Farfisa Compact Duo Mk2, Vox Continental 300, Gibson G201, Korg BX3 Mk1
            Leslie 122 x2, 145 x2, 910
            www.drawbardave.co.uk

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            • #7
              Can I just disconnect the wires from the G.G terminal and connect my line out to them? Like I do with my b3?

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              • #8
                Ah - on second look there is no g g terminal like a b3 - Anyone know where I’d run a line out on an a102?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by jwb1231970 View Post
                  Ah - on second look there is no g g terminal like a b3 - Anyone know where I’d run a line out on an a102?
                  Yes, the preamp is the same (only hanging upside down) so there are G-G terminals. But in order to get your pedal to sound thru the internal speakers you would need to feed signal _back_ again into the power amp, and that's where you'll run into problems as the power amp is designed for a very high level balanced signal. Which you won't get from your guitar pedal.
                  Current organs: AV, M-3, A-100
                  Current Leslies: 22H, 122, 770

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                  • #10
                    Yes, you can. GG terminals are located on the preamp which is upside down.

                    Geo

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                    • #11
                      The wires currently connected to g g I assume if disconnected will cause the organ to make no sound, simple as that? Is reverb somewhere else?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by enor View Post
                        Yes, the preamp is the same (only hanging upside down) so there are G-G terminals. But in order to get your pedal to sound thru the internal speakers you would need to feed signal _back_ again into the power amp, and that's where you'll run into problems as the power amp is designed for a very high level balanced signal. Which you won't get from your guitar pedal.
                        But that output from the preamp is so hot after it's gone through the guitar pedal, why wouldn't that be enough? I don't know electronics well but I do know that it's the output is so hot that I use a pad that is made for me to bring it down and not blow my guitar amp.

                        Is it because right now it's going into a guitar amp but on the organ it's going into the organ speakers which require something higher level?

                        - - - Updated - - -

                        is there a pad I can buy at a store/online? I currently use one that a guy made for me but I want another one and don't want to bug him.

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                        • #13
                          It's a _balanced_ signal, meaning that it travels on 3 separate wires - a ground connection, a "normal" signal, and an inverted version of the "normal" signal.

                          Guitar pedals don't do balanced signal, they are designed for unbalanced signal (2 connections only). Their output also isn't hot enough, but that's a moot point since it's the wrong type of signal anyway.
                          Current organs: AV, M-3, A-100
                          Current Leslies: 22H, 122, 770

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Yes, but balanced signals don't require a ground and only use two wires. You can convert from one to the other with a balun.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by KC9UDX View Post
                              Yes, but balanced signals don't require a ground and only use two wires. You can convert from one to the other with a balun.
                              The number of wires really isn't the issue here. You could use a transformer, sure, but you'd still not have a hot enough signal for the power amp, and you'd still get mono which makes the Leslie sim sound bad. This just isn't a viable idea. If one is dead set on using a Leslie sim instead of the real thing, I would strongly recommend using two powered speakers (in stereo) instead of the internal amplification of the organ.
                              Current organs: AV, M-3, A-100
                              Current Leslies: 22H, 122, 770

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