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Blonde vs Lime....

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  • Blonde vs Lime....

    Hi,

    I'm about to retrieve a blonde RT3, and I'm trying to learn about the finishes and cleaning them etc. Many good threads here, thank you.

    However, I'm confused about Lime oak vs Blonde. When I google either I get the same organs LOL

    Is limeoak blonde?

    if not, any image links apreciated.

    Thanks!
    1960 Blonde RT-3
    Leslies: 2-speed 22H, 760, 105 Round Sound Machine.
    Young Chang U121
    Fatar SL 880
    Nektar Panorama T4

  • #2
    I wholeheartedly recommend Howard’s Restore A Finish having spent today massaging it into my BC. The results are astounding. I can’t help with your question about the veneer finish though.

    I’m sure there must be a scan of an old Hammond brochure online that might show the different finishes.
    Hammond C3, M102, H112, XB3, XB5, X5, TTR-100
    Lowrey Heritage DSO-1, Yamaha E70
    Farfisa Compact Duo Mk2, Vox Continental 300, Gibson G201, Korg BX3 Mk1
    Leslie 122 x2, 145 x2, 910
    www.drawbardave.co.uk

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    • #3
      I was told by... someone?... sometime back... that there actually are no actual Blonde Hammonds, just the limed oak.

      It's a heckuva lot easier to call it Blonde though, we know the finish intended.

      I've got a C3 and PR40 in the same colour in need of attention but haven't touched it.
      -1958 Hofner 550 archtop guitar -1959 C3 and PR40- -1964 Busillachio Harmonium- -1964 M101-
      -1967ish Leslie 122- -1975 T500 (modded..chopped, and reassembled!)-
      -DIY 760 FrankenLeslie/rat hideout-
      -1980 Electrokey Electric Piano- -Yamaha electric Harmonium (early 80's?)-
      -1990 Jansen GMF150 amp- -1992 Korg 01W/fd- -1992 G&L S-500 geetar.

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      • #4
        I remember when I was a kid old painters talked about liming wood as a finishing treatment OAk was a favourite wood to do this on. I have no idea how it worked other than lime was a used like an acid wash on the wood . I don't think anyone would do this today to treat wood . Maybe some of the other refinishers could comment on this approach to wood treatment. Could be period specific and it would fit in with the Hammond creations and light colours staining practices of that era.
        Practise the theory...realize the practical
        Hammonds L100 /A100 /B3 Leslie 147 and 122 Yamaha E352 Key board driven in OVATIONS 15" 40 watt power

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        • #5
          It would seem the white streaks are filling in the grain perhaps, then a clear or honey coloured varnish?
          -1958 Hofner 550 archtop guitar -1959 C3 and PR40- -1964 Busillachio Harmonium- -1964 M101-
          -1967ish Leslie 122- -1975 T500 (modded..chopped, and reassembled!)-
          -DIY 760 FrankenLeslie/rat hideout-
          -1980 Electrokey Electric Piano- -Yamaha electric Harmonium (early 80's?)-
          -1990 Jansen GMF150 amp- -1992 Korg 01W/fd- -1992 G&L S-500 geetar.

          Comment


          • #6
            Back in the 50's some of the Gibson Les Paul Special models were Limed Mahogany. A nice look - not beige, not blonde - hard to described. Similar to the Hammond finish.

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            • #7
              A lime wash contains calcium carbonate, salt and water and provides protection for the wood. It can be used on any wood and will look different depending on the wood. UV exposure will change the color, which is more noticeable on lightly stained woods. When our maple kitchen cabinets were new, they were very light in color. Over time they have become more yellow. This can be prevented with a clear coat with u v protection. Without that protection, the color will change.
              Bill

              My home organ: Content M5800 as a midi controller for Hauptwerk

              Comment


              • #8
                Not fumed oak? I remember making something several hundred years ago in our woodworking class at school. After we'd made our pieces, they were all taken to the chemistry lab and left there in a fume cupboard with some fuming ammonia hydroxide overnight. Bet they wouldn't allow that in schools now!
                Here's a page about the technique.

                https://www.jordanwoodfloors.co.uk/f...ammonia-fuming

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