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Retractable Caster Wheels for C-3?

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    Retractable Caster Wheels for C-3?

    Hello,

    I am buying my second Hammond C-3 tomorrow (yay!!), and would like to have an easy way to move it from one area of a room to another. I was originally thinking of building a rolling platform but came across the idea of using retractable caster wheels instead (easier and much cheaper!). When in the up position, the organ would be level with the ground for the benefit of the pedals, and when I need to move the organ, I can remove the pedals, engage the wheels and presumably be on my way. The weight capacity of the set pictured is 420lbs.

    My question is, has anyone else tried this, and does it work? Or if you have a better idea, please share. Thanks!

    Click image for larger version

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    Last edited by Doctor Robert; 12-22-2018, 09:34 PM.
    sigpic
    1956 Hammond C-3
    Circa 1965 Leslie 145
    1963 Hammond D-152
    1963 Hammond C-3
    1959 Hammond HR-40 Tone Cabinet
    Motion Sound Pro 3
    Motion Sound Low Pro
    1958 Hammond M-3
    C.Bechstein D282 9'3" Concert Grand
    1977 Wurlitzer 200A

    #2
    Do you plan to drill into and, thus, ruin the finish of the C-3 to do this?

    I wouldn't.
    I'm David. 'Dave' is someone else's name.

    Comment


      #3
      The cabinet is in very good condition, but not mint (my other C-3 is). If this one were, I wouldn’t dream of drilling. But I’m open to other suggestions.
      sigpic
      1956 Hammond C-3
      Circa 1965 Leslie 145
      1963 Hammond D-152
      1963 Hammond C-3
      1959 Hammond HR-40 Tone Cabinet
      Motion Sound Pro 3
      Motion Sound Low Pro
      1958 Hammond M-3
      C.Bechstein D282 9'3" Concert Grand
      1977 Wurlitzer 200A

      Comment


        #4
        couldnt it be mounted in the inner?
        C2 1953, as old as I am and 760 rebuilt, Custom M3 1955, custom HX3, Hohner OAB, Ventilator, Service for friends on A100, B3, BV, M100 and some Leslies

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Hoaxel View Post
          couldnt it be mounted in the inner?
          That's a good thought... Hmm... I will have to take some measurements.
          sigpic
          1956 Hammond C-3
          Circa 1965 Leslie 145
          1963 Hammond D-152
          1963 Hammond C-3
          1959 Hammond HR-40 Tone Cabinet
          Motion Sound Pro 3
          Motion Sound Low Pro
          1958 Hammond M-3
          C.Bechstein D282 9'3" Concert Grand
          1977 Wurlitzer 200A

          Comment


            #6
            Or, a sheet of metal the wheels bolted on it formed as a U sticked under the sides. I like that idea
            C2 1953, as old as I am and 760 rebuilt, Custom M3 1955, custom HX3, Hohner OAB, Ventilator, Service for friends on A100, B3, BV, M100 and some Leslies

            Comment


              #7
              You mentioned legs and a B3 but it’s a C3 that I need to worry about.
              sigpic
              1956 Hammond C-3
              Circa 1965 Leslie 145
              1963 Hammond D-152
              1963 Hammond C-3
              1959 Hammond HR-40 Tone Cabinet
              Motion Sound Pro 3
              Motion Sound Low Pro
              1958 Hammond M-3
              C.Bechstein D282 9'3" Concert Grand
              1977 Wurlitzer 200A

              Comment


                #8
                Correct, Robert. I got carried away about how I might do this for the B3, o I deleted it.

                Hoaxel has a great idea. U-shaped heavy gauge steel "trough" allowing both ends of the C3 to rest on them. Just wide and deep enough for the wooden sides of the C3 to fit fairly snugly.

                You might want to line the inside vertical surfaces with felt because there will be a rotational twist of the frame, bringing pressure of the upper edge of the metal frame against the wood. Install after applying Loctite and tightening the bolts (below).

                Holes drilled for the bolts. But the head of the bolt would be on the inside and as flush as possible. Nuts with locking washers on the outside.

                All painted to match colour of the C3. Or keep them black for nice contrast.

                I have this type of wheel that can be dropped as the heavy frame is lifted for my shop equipment like my monster 8 inch jointer.

                This is a photo of what the short bolt might look like. Just take the dimensions down to a metal fabricator. Each wheel unit would be taking about 100 pounds. Not a lot of weight bearing on a robust frame, wheels and bolts.

                Who knows? You might get it patented, sell this for at least hammond C's, and make as much money as a musician..........

                Click image for larger version

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                1955 B3, Leslie 21H and 147. Hammond A100 with weird Leslie 205. 1976 Rhodes. Wurlitzer 200A. Yamaha DX7/TX7. Korg M1. Yamaha C3 grand, 67 Tele blond neck, Les Paul Standard, PRS 24, Gibson classical electric, Breedlove acoustic electric, Strat, P Bass, Rogers drum kit, Roland TD 12 digital drums, Apollo quad, older blackfaced Fender Twin, other amps, mics and bits and pieces cluttering up the "studio."

                Comment


                  #9
                  Those are good suggestions. The more I think about it, the less I want to do any drilling into the cabinet. I'm not really the sacreligious type.
                  sigpic
                  1956 Hammond C-3
                  Circa 1965 Leslie 145
                  1963 Hammond D-152
                  1963 Hammond C-3
                  1959 Hammond HR-40 Tone Cabinet
                  Motion Sound Pro 3
                  Motion Sound Low Pro
                  1958 Hammond M-3
                  C.Bechstein D282 9'3" Concert Grand
                  1977 Wurlitzer 200A

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Or something similar, but the lifters turned 90 degrees to front and back, not so much pressure on the sides and a better stand.
                    Paying a patent would cost a lot more as you can earn as musician, even if you sell more than a dozen
                    C2 1953, as old as I am and 760 rebuilt, Custom M3 1955, custom HX3, Hohner OAB, Ventilator, Service for friends on A100, B3, BV, M100 and some Leslies

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Doctor Robert View Post
                      Those are good suggestions. The more I think about it, the less I want to do any drilling into the cabinet. I'm not really the sacreligious type.
                      So, how did you go with this?
                      -------

                      Hammond M-102 #21000.
                      Leslie 147 #F7453 in the queue.
                      Hammond S-6 #72421

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Any drilling would devalue the unit if you were going to resell it. I find that with buyers they tend to get funny about things.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Don't molest the cabinet.
                          The herd of original Hammonds grows thinner every year..... one day there will barely be enough remaining to keep most of them running, with a few sacrificial units for spares.
                          I would even apply this logic to spinets, despite some people thinking they grow on trees in abundance..... if people keep chopping them and dumping them and gutting them to make ridiculous guitar effects and amplifiers, then one day the numbers will fall below critical mass required to keep them running.
                          Go ahead and flame me, I don't care - Hammonds are NOT an inexhaustible supply of bounty for the world to keep plundering.
                          Current:
                          1971 T-202 with Carsten Meyer mods: Remove key click filters, single-trigger percussion, UM 16' drawbar volume correction. Lower Manual bass foldback.
                          Korg CX3 (original 1980's analogue model).
                          1967 Leslie 122 with custom inbuilt preamp on back panel for 1/4" line-level inputs, bass & treble controls. Horn diffusers intact.
                          2009 Marshall 2061x HW Plexi head into Marshall 4x12 cabinet.

                          Former:
                          1964 C3
                          196x M-102
                          197x X5
                          197x Leslie 825

                          Comment


                          • geoffbrown
                            geoffbrown commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Yes your correct, I think every part of a hammond could be repaired or replicated, no need to trash them for parts

                          #14
                          I have no intention of molesting any cabinet. My question is to Doctor Robert.
                          -------

                          Hammond M-102 #21000.
                          Leslie 147 #F7453 in the queue.
                          Hammond S-6 #72421

                          Comment


                            #15
                            Your exactly right and Leslie's are in short supply. I have seen some terrible mods on Leslies. Just because you can do something doesn't mean you should.

                            Comment

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