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Age of hammond A100

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  • Age of hammond A100

    Hi.
    It's my first day here and I write from Spain.
    Recently I was able to buy an English A100 hammond organ and I would like to know what year it is.
    The pre-amp transformer is black and has this written:
    AO-24891-2
    606812
    Greetings and thanks.

  • #2
    606 = Woodward-Schumacher, a transformer manufacturer Hammond used that also made transformers for Fender

    812 must mean the 12th week of 1968, but that is a curious date because A100s were made between 1959 and 1965 (unless production continued in England). It can't be 1958 because Hammond was still making their own transformers in-house at that point.

    Is it possible that your A100 had the preamplifier replaced at some point? Or was its power transformer replaced?

    Hammond did continue to make A105 models until 1975, according to the Service Manual.

    To date yours, I would look for other date codes to try to see if you can find several that fall in the same range. Look at speakers, can capacitors, etc...

    I'm David. 'Dave' is someone else's name.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by David Anderson View Post
      606 = Woodward-Schumacher, a transformer manufacturer Hammond used that also made transformers for Fender

      812 must mean the 12th week of 1968, but that is a curious date because A100s were made between 1959 and 1965 (unless production continued in England). It can't be 1958 because Hammond was still making their own transformers in-house at that point.

      Is it possible that your A100 had the preamplifier replaced at some point? Or was its power transformer replaced?

      Hammond did continue to make A105 models until 1975, according to the Service Manual.

      To date yours, I would look for other date codes to try to see if you can find several that fall in the same range. Look at speakers, can capacitors, etc...
      David,

      A100s went on for many years in the UK after being cancelled in America. I too have a '68 UK A-100.
      Current organs: AV, M-3, A-100
      Current Leslies: 22H, 122, 770

      Comment


      • #4
        Why not 1958?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by enor View Post
          A100s went on for many years in the UK after being cancelled in America. I too have a '68 UK A-100.
          You learn something new every day. Are there any other model variations in the UK? Since I don't live there, I don't run into them.
          I'm David. 'Dave' is someone else's name.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by HeyIt'sBen View Post
            Why not 1958?
            A 1958 Hammond transformer would have been painted silver, not black -- assuming UK transformers followed the same color pattern as US models.

            Hammond started winding their own transformers and building their own amps around 1948 and did this through 1962, at which point they decided to go back to outsourcing transformer manufacturing. Hammond painted their in-house transformers silver, and they typically do not have date codes. The black transformers you start to see in 1962 were made by one of several transformer winding companies.
            I'm David. 'Dave' is someone else's name.

            Comment


            • #7
              Hello again and thanks for the replies.
              I'll look to see if I find other codes on valves and speakers. The only thing I can assure you is that this Hammond has drawbars engraved
              Greetings.

              Comment


              • enor
                enor commented
                Editing a comment
                Then it's a '69.

            • #8
              Originally posted by David Anderson View Post

              You learn something new every day. Are there any other model variations in the UK? Since I don't live there, I don't run into them.
              Oh yes, many; especially in the older consoles but it goes all the way thru production. Mostly it's a matter of cabinet differences since the UK cabinets were locally built rather than imported.

              The A-100 looks similar to its US counterpart, except that the wood chosen feels somewhat "cheaper".
              The C-3s have an own cabinet style with different sides than the US model
              The older consoles (CVs and older) were in a cabinet that's sort of a mix of a C and the model E
              What would be called a "model D" in the US is often labelled "BC" or even "K" in the UK


              ... and that's just (a few of) the consoles. You should see the spinet variants!
              Current organs: AV, M-3, A-100
              Current Leslies: 22H, 122, 770

              Comment


              • #9
                My 1965 UK A100 has a silver preamp transformer. Same with the reverb xfr, but the power amp has a black one.

                Comment


                • #10
                  Originally posted by alpine View Post
                  My 1965 UK A100 has a silver preamp transformer. Same with the reverb xfr, but the power amp has a black one.
                  Interesting. There have always been times when the official timeline doesn't match up with what you find in the field. Hammond UK may very well have had back-stock of AO-28s made for 230V applications using transformers made before 1962. Perhaps they did a big run of 230V transformers for UK use.

                  It's the same with early AO-28s. They are built with some parts left over from AO-10 production.
                  I'm David. 'Dave' is someone else's name.

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Originally posted by HeyIt'sBen View Post
                    Why not 1958?
                    The A-100 series went into production in August 1959.
                    Todd in Cheesecurdistan - www.blueolives.com
                    Some consoles, some Leslies, parts, tubes, etc.

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      Originally posted by David Anderson View Post

                      A 1958 Hammond transformer would have been painted silver, not black -- assuming UK transformers followed the same color pattern as US models.

                      Hammond started winding their own transformers and building their own amps around 1948 and did this through 1962, at which point they decided to go back to outsourcing transformer manufacturing. Hammond painted their in-house transformers silver, and they typically do not have date codes. The black transformers you start to see in 1962 were made by one of several transformer winding companies.
                      They were almost exclusively made by Midwest Coil & Transformer (549) where the A,B,C,D and RT are concerned. I may be mistaken but believe the matching transformers and perc matching transformers where still made in house.
                      Hammond B3 (55), B3 (70), B3 (72), B2 (51) conversion, A100 (61) chop, A100 (62), A105 (75), Northern BC (39) empty.
                      Pile of Leslies of various flavours, Minimoog, ARP Odyssey, MaxiKorg, Hohner D6, Rhodes 54, Rhodes 73, Wurlitzer A200, Wurlitzer A203W

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        I've also seen them made by Apex Coil & Transformer (949) and Transformer Manufacturers, Inc. (1052). The latter was in a 1973 B3.
                        I'm David. 'Dave' is someone else's name.

                        Comment


                        • nonreverb
                          nonreverb commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Interesting. I can't recall seeing a 1052 transformer although I've seen Apex stuff on other model Hammonds.

                      • #14
                        Check to see whether the manuals have felt gaskets or foam. Rivets = felt = good. Holes or blank = foam = maybe very bad. http://www.padrick.net/HammondRivets.jpg

                        Comment


                        • #15
                          Originally posted by Tim_at_Jonas View Post
                          Check to see whether the manuals have felt gaskets or foam. Rivets = felt = good. Holes or blank = foam = maybe very bad. http://www.padrick.net/HammondRivets.jpg
                          If it has a '68 date code on the transformers, and engraved drawbars, then we can be certain this instrument is a '69. Therefore, it will have foam.

                          It should also have a serial number starting with "A".
                          Current organs: AV, M-3, A-100
                          Current Leslies: 22H, 122, 770

                          Comment

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