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  • TWG question...

    I´m thinking an idea to create a simple tone wheel generator with only 8 tone wheels and generate only 8 frequencies. (One Shaft with 8 tone wheel to 23.125 RPM)

    -Is it possible from only 8 frequencies, to generate the other 83 frequencies ?

    -Is there an electronic device to modify the frequency of an input signal ?
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  • #2
    Anything is possible, but not everything is practical. What is it you're trying to accomplish? Why use a TWG as frequency source?
    -Admin

    Allen 965
    Zuma Group Midi Keyboard Encoder
    Zuma Group DM Midi Stop Controller
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    • #3
      If you're going to start dividing frequencies you might as well use electronic oscillators; the division itself is what causes divider organs to sound the way they do. The fat tone of the tonewheel organs stems largely from the fact that all the frequencies are directly generated.
      Current organs: AV, BC, A-100
      Current Leslies: 22H, 142, 147, 760
      Organs in the past: L-100 (several), M-100 (x2), T-100, E-100, CV
      Other keyboards: Roland FP-4, Yamaha DX7, Yamaha TX81Z, Yamaha Motif ES Rack, Korg Krome, Novation Mininova

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      • #4
        Frequency division was how most electronic organs worked into the 1970s. You had 12 oscillators that generated the 12 highest frequencies. Then you had, flip-flop dividers that generated the lower octaves. Combo organs did this with transistors.
        I'm David. 'Dave' is someone else's name.

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        • #5
          I have to ask: Why 8?? And not 12?...
          A100, X77, M3, M100
          Leslie 147, 145, X77L, two-piece homemade road Leslie
          My youtube channel

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          • #6
            I think Hammond did something similar to this in the Aurora (?). It had a 12 pack, not 8 (which i think the OP actually meant). Don't know how much better or worse it sounded but they divided those freqs off that pack like any other TOS unit. I'd like to see that schematic if someone has one.

            It wouldn't be exactly like the TOS units of days gone by. After all, the wheels are spring driven, so the same torsional resonance would exist, the only difference being your drift would affect any given note as a group. As it's fairly uncommon to have more than 2 of the same note playing at a time, the same KIND of effect -- although not at all identical -- could be realized.

            I'm told the TOS chip came in (at least) two versions. One that's hard-core static, crystal driven, and locked in phase note-to-note. The other, somewhat larger chip, has more 'imperfections' and race-conditions built in for intentional variance. But that's just a rumor. I only have the former.

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            • #7
              Novachord also use dividers. If not adjusted properly they can aldo double. And just let same frequency thru. But, 12 top octave oscillators anyway.
              A+A20+PR40+145. Novachord.

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              • #8
                Sounds like you're trying to reinvent the X-66?

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                • #9
                  ok, thank you for the information.... I did not know that the hammond x66 has a TWG with 12 wheel tone.

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                  • #10
                    The frequencies generated in the 12-wheel X66 generator aren't actually _tones_ per se, they are just reference frequencies. The output of the wheels is never actually heard.
                    Current organs: AV, BC, A-100
                    Current Leslies: 22H, 142, 147, 760
                    Organs in the past: L-100 (several), M-100 (x2), T-100, E-100, CV
                    Other keyboards: Roland FP-4, Yamaha DX7, Yamaha TX81Z, Yamaha Motif ES Rack, Korg Krome, Novation Mininova

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