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Recently Acquired Hammond Organ M100

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  • Recently Acquired Hammond Organ M100

    Hi all,

    I am new here and thought I would join this site to learn more about this incredible Hammond Organ I have uncovered in a real estate transaction. It's the M100 and has a Leslie 142 cabinet as well. I have been documenting this essentially "Barnfind" situation piece by piece in an attempt to learn more about the instruments and gear involved. I am not by any means a keyboard player but I can hit a chords and notes, enough to see what things sound like.

    From my brief experience messing around with this Hammond, I was just shocked at how diverse the instrument is when you include the drawbars and the Leslie in various combinations.

    I don't see or hear these authentic instruments in play so much these days, but I have realized that I dearly miss their sound, tone and influence on music across many genres.

  • #2
    Welcome to the forum. An M100 and Leslie 142 is a great combination! :)

    Just make sure that it's fed and watered - Hammond Oil is its favourite, once a year!
    It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

    New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

    Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha Genos, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
    Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
    Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
    Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

    Comment


    • #3
      It hasn't been played in years... so I am sure it needs oil. Where do I put that in? Is there a place in the back of the organ to do this?
      It took a while to start it up... I had no idea how to do this, but a friend told me the trick with the two switches... run and start. I documented this on my video about the organ.

      Comment


      • #4
        Instructions for the oiling procedure can be found online and there are videos on youtube. There will be some oil cups on top of the tone generator, the big part suspended on springs which has all the motors and spinning wheels. Just MAKE SURE you ONLY put Hammond oil in it, which you can buy on eBay from classic hammonds for less than $10 I believe. It should be oiled once a year, just fill up each plastic cup a couple times, doesn't need too much and don't attempt to keep them full, they act as funnels. Then there's a metal cup on top of the synchronous run motor at the right side of the organ (left side when looking in the back), there should be a sponge in there, just put a couple drops on this sponge, it really doesn't need much oil, it just keeps the motor lubed up. If you encounter any issues, particularly with the motors, there may be a broken oil wick somewhere which isn't carrying oil to where it needs to go. If you can find the spot it broke and where it isn't going to, just apply some oil directly to the area it should be taking oil, or you could try re-wicking it.
        1949 Hammond CV w/1960 Leslie 45 (converted to 145), using H-1 and Leslie 25 amp
        1958 & 63 Hammond M3
        1963 Hammond L100 with 70s Leslie 120
        1979 Rhodes Piano

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        • #5
          Thanks... I'll order some oil today. I should have added this info to the documentary video I did. I am just so amazed by this organ and all the nuance and qualities it offers. It's a very sophisticated instrument. The Draw bars are great, so the player can really dial in what they want to do..... or even manipulate things while they are playing... and the Leslie is just so beautiful in tone. It's a shame they don't make these organs anymore. Such an incredible invention. Just sampling sounds on a modern keyboard wouldn't work for me if I was a Hammond player. Seems a lost art form that should not be lost. One of the main reasons I did the video and the series I am working on documenting the abandoned 1970's studio.

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          • enor
            enor commented
            Editing a comment
            I wouldn't call it a "lost art form" ... visit any African-American church in your neck of the woods and you'll see that it's alive and thriving.

        • #6
          Welcome to the Hammond nut Forum! I own two of those and if ever I should start getting rid of some of my extensive horde of organs, they will be the last to go - but not without some great difficulty!

          Enjoy!
          Nico
          "Don't make war, make music!" Hammonds, Lowreys, Yamaha's, Gulbransens, Baldwin, Technics, Johannus. Reed organs. Details on request... B-)

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          • #7
            For sure, very cool old instruments and sad to see they aren't in production anymore. Not only that, but they haven't been for over 40 years! The real tonewheel ones at least. Thankfully though they were built to last, as long as we take care of them they aren't going anywhere, which is good, because you're right, digital sampling just doesn't do it, it isn't the same. Enjoy your rig!
            1949 Hammond CV w/1960 Leslie 45 (converted to 145), using H-1 and Leslie 25 amp
            1958 & 63 Hammond M3
            1963 Hammond L100 with 70s Leslie 120
            1979 Rhodes Piano

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