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  • C2 Chop Project - Road Organ

    Okay, I know I'll get grief from this post. If you feel the need to chastise this behavior of chopping a non B3, A100, C3, etc, then by all means, you are free to voice your opinion. I however have been playing, moving, and touring with a hammond rig for about a decade. I have had A100, B2, B3, C2, C3, and played just about every one of them at one point or another. I'm not a total newbie to this world but I have developed some necessities in any hammond that I take with me on the road. One of which is that I need a chopped cabinet and it's pretty much non-negotiable. Looking for tips and a general work plan for chopping a c2 and getting it to a leslie 47 type amp. I have a C2 that is in good condition with percussion unit but is wired for a tone cabinet hook up, not a leslie 47 which is in my main leslie 145 cab for live use.

    The things I do need.
    1. Must look good chopped. There are two routes in my opinion. The C cabinet or a custom cabinet. I had a c2 chop about 5 years ago until I sold it to Leon Bridges' organist. I loved the thing. It looked awesome, was somewhat manageable for one person. The only other option has basically led me to building my own cabinet, completely customizing the internals etc. This is a huge job and a huge cost. I'm not willing to do it. I want a c2 cab cut down at the lower part of the tone wheel assembly all the way around. All the cables and jacks (power, 1/4" 6pin) need to be mounted to the underside of the cabinet so they are not pointing at the audience while playing live.
    2. Must have an easy way to use a 1/4" volume pedal and connect to my leslie 47 type amp in a 145 cabinet. My old chop used a 1/4" out plugged into a volume pedal to a trek pre pedal to a leslie 145 cabinet with a 47 type amp. If you bring a hammond and don't play through a vintage leslie, the magic is gone in my opinion. Having a remote, detachable volume pedal causes all sorts of issues with a chop, hum buzz etc. Not going that route. Is there a better way to have a single 6pin leslie connector and a 1/4" volume pedal remote jack on a non-solid state amp? Does trek make a kit? I don't know of easy options there...
    3. Handles. Needs semi recessed handles with spring loaded hinges and good grip. These need to be black in color and heavy duty.
    4. Wheels. This is not a deal breaker but I've been wanting this... corner mounted or removable casters on the treble side of the organ's backside. Carrying a handtruck with me is not always possible anymore. Its too big and only has a single use. While great for getting the organ into the gig, I think I can do it with a smaller footprint and weight. I'm careful with the organ when moving it and would never have it on a slope where the thing could turn into a runaway casket... Preferably big removable casters that absorb some vibrations/impact and could store away during the show? Could think about corner casters if there is a good strong, heavy duty product.

    The things that I don't need.
    1. Pedals. I play mainly soul, rock, blues, etc. with a full band. Don't need to kick bass live.
    2. Effects Loop and crazy wiring. I play generally straight hammond into a leslie speaker.
    3. Multi leslie outputs- Dont need this. Always play through a mic'd leslie cabinet and can get more in my ears or monitors if needed.
    4. Super light weight custom cabinet, Ijust want to use the vintage cab and cut it down simply in my woodshop. It's okay that it is harder to pick up and I need a stand and all of that. I sometimes need to travel with the organ in a tight trailer or in my SUV and it needs to be chopped.
    5. Mimic the bottom of a hammond cab. I'll use a heavy duty custom t-style stand that I have from my old chop. Works great. looks great. can hold the organ and my stage rhodes on top with some riders if needed.
    6. Smooth Drawbars. Don't get me wrong, I love smooth drawbars. I would take them any day over ratcheting type. I just can't find a good c3 that doesn't cost $1500+. And, I would have some issues chopping a c3...
    7. Untouched cabinet. Most of my work is playing in a band where the thing wants to look like a road warrior, not a living room artifact. It's okay to have some scratches etc. in the cabinet.

    I would love to know what the process is for doing this. I had my other organ chopped professionally before purchasing it but I have been inside many organs over the past 10 years and think I could take this on myself. I also want to save some money!!

    I know a few things that will need to happen first are:
    1. Disconnect the bass pedal wiring harness, power assembly, and volume pedal rod to free the top of the organ from the bottom from a wiring perspective. Lock the tonewheel assembly down.
    2. Mark and triple check a line around the bottom of the top part of the organ (i.e. in line with the lower shelf of the tone wheel assembly in a C2.)
    3. Get a good friend to help flip the organ on its end/front while cutting each side "leg" and the back with a straight edge jig/clamps and a circular saw. Very carefully...

    Now that the top is free from the bottom, the electrical/wiring starts.
    5. Install and wire a 1/4" out with volume trim (trek II https://trekii.com/products/obl-2-2.html) I would like some advice on how to wire this properly.
    6. Mount new male grounded power jack in the bottom shelf of the remaining top part of the organ.
    7. What needs to happen with the basspedals wiring harness? Is there anything that needs to be done with the volume adjustment? Seems that It would want to be permanently trimmed to full volume so the inline 1/4" volume pedal would control the full sweep of the organ pedal range? Anything else that needs to be tidyed up on the inside of the cabinet?
    8. Route and mount side handles and wheels. Mount additional hardware for protecting while sliding the organ.

    What else? What am I missing? I would love your feedback!

    Cheers,
    -Mookie


  • #2
    First and Foremost -- Don't let ANYONE give you grief, trouble, or even a snide remark. They are insecure dweebs with nothing useful to add. Let them wallow in their sarcasm.
    If they want a voice in the matter, they may purchase yours at a price you set and then they can "preserve" it exactly as they desire. Until then, ain't dey bidness!

    Second -- you're not plowing new ground. Lots and lots of chops exist. For probably longer than you've been alive -- or nearly. Lots and lots of You Tube videos because, think about it, after you've chopped it, you'd kinda wanna show it off, too, right? So does everyone else. So you can sketch out a few ideas. This matters because aside from pros on their 10th chop, i've never heard of anyone having every single duck in a row. There's always something.

    Third -- Study. Not just chops, but the Hammond. Learn everything on HammondWiki. This sounds like silly advice but understanding the difference between the Hammond preamp output and the idea of a volume pedal is maybe one item. Understand the concept of B+. Understanding the Hammond is equipped with an *expression* pedal, not just volume is also a thing. Just saying that understanding some of these nuances up front might lead to more thorough understanding and possibly affect your configuration desires.

    Okay, so to some of your points.
    1. Disconnect the bass peds and TG. Disconnect the 110 from the TG. Remove the very long bolts from the bottoms that go up through the saddles.
    2. Remove the preamp; then remove the manuals as an assembly (this can come out the front); remove the TG.
    3. Now you got a chunk of wood cabinetry. Get your friend and make your cut on the wood all by itself so you can handle it like wood and not worry about wires and throwing sawdust into your wheels and circuits. It's also far lighter, in case you decide a table saw or some strange attitude is the cut required.
    4. Work the wood until it's the way you like. I think case handles, even HD ones, are a pain. But whatever handle you decide, now's the time.
    5. Now you can start deciding what you want back in there.

    Having had a number of Hammonds and chops, I'm working on my final two units. A fairly radical chop of a spinet and a 'stealth' chop of a C3. Still got a few details to work out myself.
    But in my situation - which isn't to say i'm right or wrong - I'm keeping the full length cabinet and, essentially, integrating ROKs as part of the cabinet. I'm sacrificing some of the Hammond insides for weight and performance. Wish i was far enough along to share some pics. But that's totally me, not you, only offering that as yet more options.

    One bit of "grief" I will give you - and I'm genuinely all for whatever makes a guy happy -- is that to simply remember that this is not some 'learning' project. What you're doing is tantamount to pounding out fenders on a 1970s Camaro or Mustang. You may not get another chance to get this right. I don't know. Maybe in the 1970s, a guy could chop and dispose and try again. Many did. Many set fires to spinets back then. So while I have no desire to tell you what to do, it's totally you, my only hope is that you do it well and are proud and satisfied once you're done. That's really all that counts.

    TOG

    Comment


    • #3
      @tiredoldgeezer,

      I'm with you on your sentiments. I do think that one of the issues is that many people have assumed that their skill levels in performing a chop (particularly on cabinetry) is higher than it actually is. Small inaccuracies that creep into the work can easily start to add up to a 'bodged' job. It is these cases and a lack of thoughtful design and/or finishing that take an initial dream and turns it into a compromised nightmare. A similar caution can apply when working with the manuals, TG and amp in regards to ones ability with the various tasks required.

      There is no choice other than to remove the entire guts of the organ, woodworking is woodworking, not dancing amongst loose wires and other parts - not to mention the extra weight to be handled at wieid and wonderful angles. I have recently been working on a C-3 that was chopped (just below the TG shelf) by someone 30+ years ago. The thing was still rank with sawdust and even sizeable chips of cabinetry - and it had been gigged for 15 years after that!! I have made some significant changes to its cabinet to lower the profile and thin the side cheeks out prior to routing for case handles.

      It goes without saying, that once you have amp, manuals and TG out - then it is also time for some clean up and TLC to those items. As you pointed out, learn, think ahead and have a plan. Above all, when working with timber and saws, the adage "measure twice, cut once" applies (in fact I measure many times before using any saw).

      Peter
      1966 C-3 / 925
      1965 M102 / 145
      1967 M111A / 330

      Comment


      • #4
        Preach it, brother!
        Every man's gig is different, so there's no one-size-fits-all. But there are some pretty good rules of thumb (that's right, ladies). Rule #1 - you wanna be glad you did it.

        Back in 79 or so, Eddie Jobson of UK had a pretty impressive rig. I got the impression he was from real money. Anyway, the look of his C3 and Yamaha CS80 and maybe a Prophet 5 (or 10) and an Electric Grand all bothered him so he had them all painted black. Yup. So it'd all match.

        Which brings me to this: what does "look good" mean to you? To him, it was gloss black on everything. To me, it's not. Often, it's gloss white on everything. Your call.

        In fact, a mediocre speaker builder can fabricate a Hammond enclosure that's superior in looks and strength to a chopped original. Quatrefoils, included, if that's what a guy wants. I saw an absolutely stunning cabinet that until I ran my hand across it, could not tell it was woodgrain formica all over. Intimate as it was, in the dimmed club lighting, it was difficult to tell. His reason? The veneer was so scarred and scratched, it was simply easier to laminate another layer of material that's way tougher than mahogany. I think some of it was formica and some was that really thin woodgrain they use in cars and planes. Regardless, it was sweet.

        So another option is like many do: build a box and transfer the guts. This allows a guy to more easily reverse course if he ever changes his mind about anything. The box can be as authentic or as wild as a guy would like. Any color; any shape; stand/no-stand; lid/no-lid; glitter; plain; slick; corner molding; tall/short/tilt. It can look like Prince's guitar. Any look a guy wants - the sky's the limit. When you're 'done', burn the box and return the contents.

        Or build the next iteration for your upcoming jazz trio. Or another for your upcoming hair-band tour. Just move stuff around.

        Just thinking out loud.

        TOG




        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks for the feedback! This is awesome advice and I'm totally onboard with both of you. I appredciate the perspective both of you bring to the table. Glad I didn't start this thing with a bunch of criticism. That would have been a bit of a bore...

          I have done a good amount of digging on the web to know that there's so much to know about the inter workings of these great instruments that, no much knowledge is too much. To give a little background, I've a full wood working shop (tablesaws, cnc router, drill press, bandsaws, planer, etc.) but I'm nervous about making a chop that looks too crafted. There's something very nice about the simplicity of a c2 chop that just looks good and is super easy. That said, I've not taken out the tone generator, preamp and manuals before... seems a little daunting. Maybe not? I'm also an architect and have designed many many things in life. It's my jam and I love doing it. Just don't know if this is the right venue to flex... I've done custom leslie cabinets, portable keyboard enclosures, reskinned rhodes and so many more things. But I'm no hammond genius or a total pro by any means. Just trying to keep this simple and successful.

          My questions/comments:
          -Is the removal of the organ and guts from the cabinet a hard task? it just taking the whole thing out of the cabinet and keep it all connected? Get a few people and make it easy to lift out? and store for the woodworking portion of the project?
          -I'd like to not have to build a cabinet and figure out the mounting holes and all of the details. Hammond woodworking was beautiful and I think there is a lot of magic from the years cooked into the wood on these old ladies. I'd rather keep it and use it. The only other thing that I could see doing is using the tone cab that I got with the organ as the wood for a new custom case. But that would be a ton of work.
          -I realize that I'll only have one chance to chop the cabinet. I'll have countless chances to build a new case for it. That said, I need to have this up and running in about 2 weeks from June 20th to July 1st. Time is of the essence so I'd rather just use the OG case I think, unless there are significant weight savings to building a new case. I was under the impression that most of the weight is in the tone generators and manuals and preamp, not in the beautiful woodworking that holds it all.

          Comment


          • peterb_2795
            peterb_2795 commented
            Editing a comment
            Even after slimming the cheeks down on the chop that I am working on, the cabinet is still 23Kg empty. Saving of weight is not the primary aim, being able to fit it into a smaller space for transport and into/out of tight places is the main game. Rather than attaching wheels, why not consider a custom dolly with side edges and a lining that the organ will sit on its back nicely into? Pretty quick to make up.

        • #6
          Originally posted by mtier0067 View Post
          There's something very nice about the simplicity of a c2 chop that just looks good and is super easy.
          Michael Phelps looks good and makes it look super easy.

          Okay, in fairness, people far more dullard and far more high than yourself have cut Hammonds in half and realized serviceable results. Obviously, at its base functionality, the elex do all the work and the box keeps them all in the same place. We bring up some woodworking concerns simply because the wood is whatcha see most. On Day One, it might be the coolest thing ever but as your eye acclimates to the detail, you might observe an increasing number of shortcomings. That's generally bad ju-ju. So you certainly wanna minimize those.

          If you had an A, it might be even easier as those are just about cutting off the legs like a magic act.


          Originally posted by mtier0067 View Post
          I've not taken out the tone generator, preamp and manuals before... seems a little daunting. Maybe not? I'm also an architect and have designed many many things in life. It's my jam and I love doing it. Just don't know if this is the right venue to flex... I've done custom leslie cabinets, portable keyboard enclosures, reskinned rhodes and so many more things. But I'm no hammond genius or a total pro by any means. Just trying to keep this simple and successful.
          Sounds to me like you got the per-requisites covered. You got the gear. Some bros and some care (and maybe some stain and finish) and you'll easily turn out an above-average job. We see so many times a guy with a skillsaw attacks one and says, "WHOA, DUDE! did you know there'd be soldering??" His solution is black rattle-can and to ignore it.

          It's fun and it's cool, but daunting? Only if you decide it to be. There's no real 'circuitry'. Lotta connections. More tedium than daunting what with all the solder work.

          Of note, if you cut along the generator shelf (far and away the most popular spot) and cut the solid back along the same line, it may be worth your time to introduce a fastener or two at that joint to re-establish increased shear support that the back generally provides. It will work without it, but as a road dog, you'll enjoy some increased rigidity.

          Also some have done a neat job of separating the two and retained the lower as a stand. Often a sheet of thin plyboard routed to profile and stained to match - just to hold things together. Maybe not roadworthy - though, that's been done - but you gotta put the chop somewhere and back on its own legs is a cool effect, for storage if nothing else.

          Think about where you want your ins and outs to be. This is easy to turn into a total kluge. Side, front, back, bottom, face, it's all been done. Jon Lord, of course, has a nice metal panel in the back. I've run mine out the bottom. But my spinet is out the front. Don't think anyone has gone out the top, as such. Seems a bit regressive. But I've also gone out through cheek block replacements. Again, your choice.


          Originally posted by mtier0067 View Post
          -Is the removal of the organ and guts from the cabinet a hard task? it just taking the whole thing out of the cabinet and keep it all connected? Get a few people and make it easy to lift out? and store for the woodworking portion of the project?
          I've done it by myself. It ain't that hard.
          Learn, learn, learn. The more you learn the more you'll say "I got this." This system was designed in 1927 or so. Naturally, it will look foreign to what you see today. But its simplicity is its advantage.
          Everything is (more or less) modular. 4 bolts out the bottom (they're like 10 inches, each) provide capture and alignment for the whole thing. A WHOLE lot of desoldering - which is easy cuz you really can't hurt anything by disconnecting it.
          In fact, were I to hypothesize, I think more than one guy gets inside and says, "heck, this is little more than farm machinery" and assumes the wrong attitude, thus ending up with a crappy result.
          Except for very old models,the manuals come out one at a time. So it can be a one-man job. Slip some plastic sheets (thin, rigid HDPE or similar, vertically at the parting plane) in there to prevent scratching if that matters.

          Originally posted by mtier0067 View Post
          -I'd like to not have to build a cabinet and figure out the mounting holes and all of the details. Hammond woodworking was beautiful and I think there is a lot of magic from the years cooked into the wood on these old ladies. I'd rather keep it and use it. The only other thing that I could see doing is using the tone cab that I got with the organ as the wood for a new custom case. But that would be a ton of work.
          Ain'ta lot to 'figure out'.
          But yes, I tend to keep the Hammond wood, myself.
          Lotta tone cabs have suffered far worse fates.
          Originally posted by mtier0067 View Post
          -I realize that I'll only have one chance to chop the cabinet. I'll have countless chances to build a new case for it. That said, I need to have this up and running in about 2 weeks from June 20th to July 1st. Time is of the essence so I'd rather just use the OG case I think, unless there are significant weight savings to building a new case. I was under the impression that most of the weight is in the tone generators and manuals and preamp, not in the beautiful woodworking that holds it all.
          You're right on both counts.
          I tend to selectively ditch some stuff, but i'm not about to open that can.

          A chop for weight savings - in and of itself - will be a bit of a disappointment. That bass pedal rail is weighty, but that's about it. 30lbs? Someone has the numbers, I'm sure. But i think you'll maybe lose 10%. You gain compactness and a couple of handles (watch your CG on those). Which is why some don't even chop but attach Roll-Or-Karis and just leave them on. Technically more weight, but your road-ready Hammond is 'prepared' in about 5 minutes.
          I know it sounds like a cop-out, but I keep returning to Rule #1 - you wanna be glad you did it.

          TOG


          Comment


          • #7
            Taking the manuals out is _much_ easier thru the back than out the front. It's just a matter of finding a table-like surface of suitable height, and sliding the whole package out. No lifting, no separating the manual pack, no enlisting of friends.

            Attached Files
            Current organs: AV, M-3, A-100
            Current Leslies: 22H, 122, 770

            Comment


            • #8
              Here's my C2.
              You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 4 photos.
              BCV, C2, M3, C3
              HR40, 142, 760, 771
              Once upon a time I was a musician, now I just collect Hammonds!:->

              Comment


              • enor
                enor commented
                Editing a comment
                They didn't skimp on the wheel diameter! Looks like it has good offroad capabilities ;)

              • RogerRabbit
                RogerRabbit commented
                Editing a comment
                "offroad" - just had a vision in my head of a potential Monty Python sketch with someone trying to play it while rolling over a battlefield :)

            • #9
              The tires are pneumatic and removable as they are bolted to a plate which is fastened to the organ bottom. Once the organ is lifted from the van, it can be wheeled around by one person like using a dolly. Not my design but it works well if you're big and strong.
              BCV, C2, M3, C3
              HR40, 142, 760, 771
              Once upon a time I was a musician, now I just collect Hammonds!:->

              Comment


              • #10
                Fabulous feedback. Thx thx thx! I think taking the whole assembly out from the back will be the best for me. I have a few moveable tables with adjustable height (Huge capacity to hold like 10 sheets of 4x8 10ply... No unsoldering this route, correct? Unscrew the 10" bolts and a few other screws then you can pull it out? I'll do some digging to figure out what the process is here unless someone has a step by step. Seems fairly straight forward. I tend to document thoroughly with photos and labeled tape/markers as I'm going through any project to retrace my steps and make sure things go back as they were. I think chopping flush with the bottom of the TG/Preamp shelf will be best. I'd love to keep the pedal/rod combo as you Jwolter have. Slick and would allow a 6pin direct to the leslie without a trek II at my feet... Just go half moon and/or footswitch to change speeds on the leslie. Have you any problems with hum or added noise? How does the pedal stay put when it's mounted up?

                Comment


                • #11
                  Originally posted by mtier0067 View Post
                  Fabulous feedback. Thx thx thx! I think taking the whole assembly out from the back will be the best for me. I have a few moveable tables with adjustable height (Huge capacity to hold like 10 sheets of 4x8 10ply... No unsoldering this route, correct? Unscrew the 10" bolts and a few other screws then you can pull it out?
                  You still need to unsolder the harness from the tone generator. The harness can stay attached to both manuals though.
                  Current organs: AV, M-3, A-100
                  Current Leslies: 22H, 122, 770

                  Comment


                  • #12
                    I have in the past removed both TG and manuals out through the rear of an organ. It makes it a two person, jiggle job. Meaning that you have to do a little move of the TG within the constraint available of the attached harness, then a small move of the manuals. Rinse and repeat multiple times until you will have the two items out.

                    In terms of efficiency, it is a waste of time. In terms of the chance of damaging the harness (or creating a broken wire still within the sheathing), possibly high - depending on how much you think you can move in one go, and how careful you are.

                    Would I do it again? definitely NOT, it is just not worth it. A short period of time spent up front de-soldering will repay itself many times over in different ways.

                    It is far easier and more efficient to simply de-solder. You will no doubt be there de-soldering the pedal harness anyway if (as you say) you won't be needing a pedal-board, so might as well de-solder the manual harness at the same time (put some paper clips in the unused TG lugs to make for easier re-positioning when you go back to soldering the harness back into place).

                    Separating the components also makes handling and storage a little bit easier as indeed the argument for a fully detached TG makes it much easier to do some independent cleaning and oiling whilst out from the organ.
                    1966 C-3 / 925
                    1965 M102 / 145
                    1967 M111A / 330

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      Originally posted by peterb_2795 View Post
                      (put some paper clips in the unused TG lugs to make for easier re-positioning when you go back to soldering the harness back into place).
                      Good tip!
                      I've used string to mark mine off, but I'm gonna try your paperclip idea.
                      With full credit, of course :-)
                      Originally posted by peterb_2795 View Post
                      Separating the components also makes handling and storage a little bit easier as indeed the argument for a fully detached TG makes it much easier to do some independent cleaning and oiling whilst out from the organ.
                      Hard to get her up in the stirrups with company.
                      But that whole Steve Leigh lube procedure is a bit of an undertaking.
                      Worth it. And always very cool. Done several.
                      But still some doing.


                      Comment


                      • peterb_2795
                        peterb_2795 commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Just done the three times round robin of naptha, compressed air blow out, oil, run-in on a TG a la Steve Leigh method. Now spins up and down like a dream.. My neighbour happened to call in as I was just doing some running and spin down. Having a mechanical background, he commented that the TG and the balance/spin down time was a "thing of beauty" to behold. Then of course, we cracked a beer open ... lol

                      • tiredoldgeezer
                        tiredoldgeezer commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Always used acetone. It seemed to cut the crud quicker and easier than naptha - which ain't bad.
                        Nothing in there I could see was acetone vulnerable and it continues to work.
                        Just had to use safety glasses cuz it slings that stuff if you splash on a fast running wheel.

                        I use two different hypodermics. Steve said to just let the bearing scream, but i absolutely don't. Solvent until it chirps, then oil immediately.

                    • #14
                      Originally posted by mtier0067 View Post
                      Fabulous feedback. Thx thx thx! I think taking the whole assembly out from the back will be the best for me. I have a few moveable tables with adjustable height (Huge capacity to hold like 10 sheets of 4x8 10ply... No unsoldering this route, correct? Unscrew the 10" bolts and a few other screws then you can pull it out? I'll do some digging to figure out what the process is here unless someone has a step by step. Seems fairly straight forward. I tend to document thoroughly with photos and labeled tape/markers as I'm going through any project to retrace my steps and make sure things go back as they were. I think chopping flush with the bottom of the TG/Preamp shelf will be best. I'd love to keep the pedal/rod combo as you Jwolter have. Slick and would allow a 6pin direct to the leslie without a trek II at my feet... Just go half moon and/or footswitch to change speeds on the leslie. Have you any problems with hum or added noise? How does the pedal stay put when it's mounted up?
                      No issues with hum/noise. I do use a trek line out to a 760 leslie though. As for the pedal base moving, it's secured simply by fit. If you look closely, the lexan has ears that stick out on both sides. It can't move forward as the stand keeps it in place.
                      BCV, C2, M3, C3
                      HR40, 142, 760, 771
                      Once upon a time I was a musician, now I just collect Hammonds!:->

                      Comment


                      • #15
                        This may have me cast as a slacker or lazy but... I'll ask anyways. With the organ in its full condition but with lower components removed (TG, manuals, preamp, etc. inside) can't I just seal off the manuals and all holes in the cabinet with plastic/tape and probably some more reliable securing and just cut? It'll be heavier but to not have to dismantle, desolder, reassemble, solder this would be a much quicker job for me. Is it crazy to think that an hour or two of really sealing up the whole top of the cabinet from dust and chips would save me a ton of wiring work? My initial thought, (the lazy/time constrained thought) was just to (1) disassemble the pedals, swell, power, 6pin and desolder the pedals from the TG, store the rest of the cables against the side wall with duct tape, (2) seal all around the manuals, cheek blocks, top rail, etc. with plastic garbage bags and painters tape, then put a heavier contractors bag cut to size and duct tape that down, then put down the lid over the plastic/tape sealing the manuals and lock/secure that in place, then (3) mark, triple check, and seal up the internals with the same method as the manuals (plastic bag, tape, contractors bag, etc) then cut the back panel on my table saw to be 1/8" lower than flush with the bottom of the TG shelf, install 2 more thumbscrews in the bottom of the panel to link the back panel to the lower shelf at the end grain. The cut back panel would be placed over the garbage bags/tape and seal the whole backside. (4) Before cutting anything else on the cabinet and creating dust near the organ, there would be other holes to seal up like the pedals/swell hole and the TG lock holes, among others. (5) Once everything was sealed against dust, it seems like a simple job to create the straight line jig to cut 1/8" lower than the bottom of the TG bottom shelf on each side of the organ with it flipped on the side and a sturdy step stool to get the proper body position while cutting :) If needed, a little sanding of the cut line could be acceptable. Then it seems like the organ just needs to have a few new 6pin, 1/4" out with trim, power sockets placed in the bottom shelf and wired (I may need help with that part!)

                        Is this crazy to think that I could just do it with much less work? I want to do it right but sometimes, there's a higher chance of screwing something up by desoldering, disassembling, reassembling, moving etc. I just want to make this easy and successful. Just need a super simple chop job that takes the upper part of a c2 and uses the rest as great old wood to build another project with! Maybe a v2 of my mini leslie flatpack speaker...

                        I love that lexan idea, dude. Would be nice to keep the original pedal, love how they feel underfoot and no other swell... Where do you store/secure the lexan and aluminium during transport?

                        If I do go the soldering/disassembly route, that paper clip trick is money. Thanks for that!

                        Let me know your thoughts!

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