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XTP keys - availability

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  • XTP keys - availability

    Does any one know where I can purchase keys for the T series Hammond? Black ones are breaking off.
    Thank you,
    Jim

  • #2
    Find a dead L or T and cannibalise - probably the cheapest way. If you're in the USA, there are sure to be some dead T's around for free or peanuts.
    It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

    New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

    Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha Genos, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
    Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
    Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
    Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

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    • #3
      The M100 takes the same as the T series too. I guess the R100 might have the same, The H100, perhaps and the E100 too?
      Looks like Tonewheel General Hospital has some:
      http://tonewheelgeneral.com/search_r...Parts+Database
      -1958 Hofner 550 archtop guitar -1959 C3 and PR40- -1964 Busillachio Harmonium- -1964 M101-
      -1967ish Leslie 122- -1975 T500 (modded..chopped, and reassembled!)-
      -DIY 760 FrankenLeslie/rat hideout-
      -1980 Electrokey Electric Piano- -Yamaha electric Harmonium (early 80's?)-
      -1990 Jansen GMF150 amp- -1992 Korg 01W/fd- -1992 G&L S-500 geetar.

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      • #4
        All overhanging keys are the same (for tonewheel models). L-100, M-100, E-100, T-100, R-100, H-100, X-77 - all interchangeable.
        Current organs: AV, M-3, A-100
        Current Leslies: 22H, 122, 770

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        • #5
          I've got a bunch.
          How many do you need?
          Play Music Everyday

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          • #6
            Thanks.
            I found some used keys on eBay. I guess new ones for a nearly 50 year old organ would be impossible to find.
            Jim

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            • #7
              I have .stl files for them, should you wish to make your own on a 3d printer
              Current organs: AV, M-3, A-100
              Current Leslies: 22H, 122, 770

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              • #8
                Since you have to pull the keys anyway to change them, you can possibly repair the broken part - the tower just above the screw - with Super Glue and then insert a slightly longer screw. This may require a trip to Lowes or the hardware store, but I found this out after replacing a bunch of broken keys in my T582C. I ordered some Tonewheel Gen. and they were all sorts of colors. It looks sort of like lemon candy stripes now. :) (And I have a couple of newly broken keys to repair on it when I get a chance.)
                -- I'm Lamar -- Allen TC-4 Classic -- 1899 Kimball, Rodgers W5000C, Conn 643, Hammond M3, L-102 - "Let no man belong to another who can belong to himself." (Alterius non sit qui suus esse potest​ -) ​Paracelsus

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                • #9
                  The problem with gluing them is that the plastic towers are equally brittle all along their length. Gluing them together usually means they'll break again shortly, just beside the previous break.
                  Current organs: AV, M-3, A-100
                  Current Leslies: 22H, 122, 770

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                  • #10
                    Working in the field I had some broken keys with no replacements. I thought a longer screw would work but didn't have any. So, I took the original screw and removed the lock washer. This added enough length to secure the key to the key channel. I used a pair of side cutters to cut off the washer. A longer screw is a good fix because the additional threads are within the body of the key so, much stronger.

                    Geo

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                    • #11
                      Can anyone please tell me what the Hammond key material is? Is it a thermoplastic? The reason that I ask is that I have had very poor results with repair attempts on plastics using glues, cements, cyanoacrylate, solvent/acetone-based, etc. and have resorted to plastic welding some plastics.

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                      • #12
                        The diving board keys are thermoplastic, the waterfall keys are thermoset...holds true for the white keys, but the black ones could be either. It is not uncommon to see t'plastic black keys on a waterfall keyboard.

                        To the OP or anyone else who needs any keys of either type, I have several complete sets of both, and whoever needs them can have as many as they want for cost of postage.
                        I literally threw hundreds of them in the dumpster recently because I am running out of room and am in the process of downsizing. Tried selling them on ebay...$25 for a complete set and got no takers at all.
                         
                        In theory, there is no difference between theory and reality.
                        In reality, there is.
                        '54 C-2 & Pair of 122 Leslies
                        H-324/Series 10 TC
                        '35 Model A (Serial# 41) with a 21H
                        Look at some of my rescues:
                        https://www.flickr.com/photos/58226398@N03/albums

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