Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A100 Distortion

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by KC9UDX View Post
    I've been much chided for waiting until it's ​​​​​​absolutely​ necessary to replace electrolytics for this reason. I've had just enough brand new capacitors go bad in a short time over the last twenty years to justify leaving a working eighty year old electrolytic in service almost every time.
    Well if you're dealing with Sprague which got bought up by another company, Cornell Dubilier and for some years now there have been reports that the once trusted Sprague name has started to fade, might need to check out other brands.

    Since the amount of effort to work on these organs can be tasking, I prefer to spend a little more for better parts/capacitors rather than go for the least expensive and not have to double back and redo the repair.

    Keep in mind, when these organs were assembled back in Chicago, the technicians were provided bins of caps that were each tested before being installed and they rejected caps that did not pass muster.

    Shouldn't we be doing that still and more so today when everything is now an IC and less of the parts with which these organs were assembled?


    Comment


    • #17
      I don't buy cheap; but I'm not even sure which brands I've had issues with. I could probably open up my favourite oscilloscope and tell you one of them: I was so disgusted with the nearly instant, unwarranted failure of several axials that I replaced in that, that I left them in there and just don't use the thing anymore. I don't think I've bought any Sprague brand ones since the 80s, but I could be wrong. I guess I don't pay enough attention to the brand names. I do avoid the Chinese brands like the plague though.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Goff View Post
        Well if you're dealing with Sprague which got bought up by another company, Cornell Dubilier and for some years now there have been reports that the once trusted Sprague name has started to fade, might need to check out other brands.
        The Sprague Atom axial electrolytic capacitor brand is now owned by Vishay, not CDE. The electrolytic and film capacitor divisions were split up decades ago. Sprague Orange Drop (film caps) became SBE and was acquired by CDE in recent years. "Sprague" as a single company has not existed for a very long time. A lot of buying and selling of different divisions goes on in the electronic parts industry; it's in constant flux with a few big players.

        At present, Nichicon appears to be narrowing their offerings in the TVX axial line. They may be ending the line or simply eliminating values they don't sell many of.

        I'm David. 'Dave' is someone else's name.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by David Anderson View Post

          The Sprague Atom axial electrolytic capacitor brand is now owned by Vishay, not CDE. The electrolytic and film capacitor divisions were split up decades ago. Sprague Orange Drop (film caps) became SBE and was acquired by CDE in recent years. "Sprague" as a single company has not existed for a very long time. A lot of buying and selling of different divisions goes on in the electronic parts industry; it's in constant flux with a few big players.

          At present, Nichicon appears to be narrowing their offerings in the TVX axial line. They may be ending the line or simply eliminating values they don't sell many of.
          Thanks for the added info David.

          Orange Drops are the popular guitar caps.

          Would you know who made the red caps in the later consoles for Hammond?

          A place up in Canada has a variety of caps.

          Some time ago they advertised buying up the old Nichicon caps that were discontinued.

          https://www.partsconnexion.com/capacitors-ele.html



          Last edited by Goff; 11-13-2019, 04:42 PM.

          Comment


          • David Anderson
            David Anderson commented
            Editing a comment
            I believe Good-All made the red caps in Hammond consoles, although I have seen capacitors from other companies like TRW in '73 and later consoles. As I've said before, I don't think there was anything special or remarkable about the red caps. They were a typical plastic encapsulated Mylar capacitor. In fact, I have seen them short as coupling caps in A-100 power amps and burn up the output tubes.

            I've known about Parts Connexion for years and have ordered some parts from them for HiFi amp builds. As I've gotten more experience, I realized that virtually the same results can be achieved with quality parts from general suppliers. There's a lot of psychology at work in the audiophile market. In other words, they create perceived value by positioning certain products as the audio equivalent of luxury items, like the bottle of wine that costs $500.

        • #20
          Yes I realize boutique stores like PCX sell some wine-tasting party parts.

          I had to get a pair of certain value resistors to make a re-rack for some Neve pres to mount before the output knob and found them on PCX.

          I couldn't find them readily in conus.

          And the PCX site used to have some type of description per cap brand/type. They've changed their site configuration lately.

          I like reasonable priced caps but without being able to test each part when ordering online, I tend to go for cap makers who do an amount of quality control testing before they sell them out the doors. But some of those caps are way out there and they tend to be too large for most of the apps I'm around.

          JENSEN Capacitors, after nearly 100 years in business, has been purchased by DUELUND AUDIO, sold off all their machines but the caps will still be made in Denmark.

          I used to visit an amp builder/seller of hi-fi gear. He was constantly with a solder iron swapping resistors and checking for response.

          It can get that way when it comes to these type of parts.

          I mean I get it but getting to a "that'll do" spot in the chain, have to know when to call it and just sit back and listen to the gear and get off the carousel.



          Last edited by Goff; 11-13-2019, 07:50 PM.

          Comment


          • #21
            Update: Home run !! A new set of tubes did the trick ! This organ now screams and there's no hums, buzzes, weird sounds...just a clean crisp sounding A102 !!
            Thanks all for the help !!

            Comment


            • #22
              Awesome news! Now you can put the old tubes back in one at a time and find the troublemaker(s) 8)
              Tom in Tulsa

              Fooling with: 1969 E100, 1955 M3, 1963 M100, Leslie 720

              Comment


              • Drawbar Dave
                Drawbar Dave commented
                Editing a comment
                And clean the tube sockets as you go.

              • David Anderson
                David Anderson commented
                Editing a comment
                99% of the time, especially with miniature tubes, it's the tube pins, not the sockets, that need the cleaning.

            • #23
              Right on, Dave!
              Tom in Tulsa

              Fooling with: 1969 E100, 1955 M3, 1963 M100, Leslie 720

              Comment


              • #24
                Originally posted by gtojimmy View Post
                Update: Home run !! A new set of tubes did the trick ! This organ now screams and there's no hums, buzzes, weird sounds...just a clean crisp sounding A102 !!
                Thanks all for the help !!
                In situations like this not only is it a great feeling to know you have new tubes, you don't have to go chasing ghosts!
                Pleased it worked out for you!


                Click image for larger version  Name:	giphy.gif Views:	1 Size:	481.7 KB ID:	670788

                And since we were discussing no fine wine before its time, take a gander at this cap.

                Click image for larger version  Name:	DUELUND-71547.jpg Views:	0 Size:	160.9 KB ID:	670797Duelund Capacitor 12.0uF 100Vac-200Vdc VSF-Cu


                These guys bought up Jensen caps. Price for the above:
                USD $764.8

                David Anderson commented
                99% of the time, especially with miniature tubes, it's the tube pins, not the sockets, that need the cleaning.
                Yeah it's best to clean both.

                I saw this way of cleaning the pins:


                I don't have a Dremel kit. I use very fine sand paper 1200 grit and denatured alcohol.
                For the sockets denatured alcohol or your choice of cleaner and interdental brushes. There are many brands and styles. They will get into the 9-pin sockets.
                Click image for larger version  Name:	?u=https%3A%2F%2Ftse2.mm.bing.net%2Fth%3Fid%3DOIP.d9MM8H4L2j4_lCsiTuxqWwHaHa%26pid%3DApi&f=1.jpg Views:	0 Size:	61.4 KB ID:	670800

                Here's another clip with more basic tools and a way to keep the butterfly wing script from coming off.


                With so many pollutants in the air these days, can't overlook cleaning tube pins and sockets on a regular basis.
                Last edited by Goff; 11-16-2019, 01:18 PM.

                Comment


                • #25
                  Update to the update:
                  Funny thing...after being all elated and giddy, and calling it good, the next day something went south, AGAIN! After a little poking around, noted percussion was squirrely, started noticing distortion, loss of volume. Set out to find out what was going on with the percussion and unsoldered K and M terminal leads and noted around 11 volts at the terminals, and nothing would have any influence.
                  Upon getting ready to bench this thing again, found ONE STRAND of wire on the pilot light lead at the terminal I didn't notice, and it was hanging out there like a wild eyebrow hair! When I screwed the shield on, the strand was touching the shield, grounding the heater circuit and knocking down the voltage by shorting pins 3/4 to ground on V8 ! Once corrected, voltage at K was restored, and once I started the organ, all was well. I'm guessing this was my intermittent since putting the amp back in?
                  I'm not saying anything, so as not to jinx it !! As I recall someone advising, check your work...great advice!
                  Last edited by gtojimmy; 11-18-2019, 03:17 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #26
                    ONE STRAND of wire on the pilot light lead at the terminal I didn't notice
                    Click image for larger version

Name:	tumblr_nrahzp7Eks1s2f16eo2_400.gif
Views:	52
Size:	818.6 KB
ID:	670944
                    Click image for larger version

Name:	ColorlessGraciousGentoopenguin-size_restricted.gif
Views:	45
Size:	277.6 KB
ID:	670945

                    Comment


                    • #27
                      Originally posted by Goff View Post

                      Click image for larger version

Name:	tumblr_nrahzp7Eks1s2f16eo2_400.gif
Views:	52
Size:	818.6 KB
ID:	670944
                      Click image for larger version

Name:	ColorlessGraciousGentoopenguin-size_restricted.gif
Views:	45
Size:	277.6 KB
ID:	670945
                      Just a "Homer Simpson" moment...DOH!

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X