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  • L-100 and Effects Pedals



    Good Morning All</P>


    Has anyone had any luck or experience with using guitar-based effects pedals in their spinet organs? I purchased a Boss RT-20 rotary simulator the other day and am fairly impressed with how it sounds (Thanks to Organgrinder010 for his posts on where in the signal to place the pedal (After the percussion amp)). My only issue is the overdrive on the pedal is pretty crappy sounding. I have a couple of good overdrive pedals for my guitar and was thinking of using a Maxon 808 (Similar to a 808 Tube Screamer) in front of the RT-20. Any tips or warnings? Are thereother pedals oroptions bettersuited for these organsout there? </P>
    <P mce_keep="true"></P>


    Thanks in advance</P>
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    <P mce_keep="true"></P>

  • #2
    Re: L-100 and Effects Pedals



    TSS,</P>


    I just picked up an RT-20 myself and have it connected to a line out from the main channel of my M101 then to a keyboard amp. I found the overdrive fairly realistic if you just use a little bit of it and mean a very small amount. I have the control bairly cracked and get a clean sound with the expression pedal at modest volumes. When I open her up and floor the exp pedal the OD kicks in sounding like a AO-28 going in to overdrive, well kinda anyway. I also ran a TS-10 and TS-808 RI in front of the RT with similar results. The drive controls had to be backed way off of guitar levels for a decent sound.</P>


    With the OD off I connected a Boss OS-2 set to distortion mode going for the Jon Lord Marshal sound. This worked pretty well also. The keyboard amp is brighter than the M101 speakers and I think this has a part to play in the sound. The M101 is a bit mushy on its own to start with.</P>


    I have found the RT-20 needs to be set up with the controls for effect at a very low level. If not the thing sounds like a motorboating scanner on a half dead M3 when trying to get a leslie effect. Chorale (slow) is better than the fast speed effect IMO. Fast is a bit choppy. I wish they built it with effect level controls for both slow and fast rather than one knob for both. Set up is a compromise.</P>


    Over allI think it is a decent alernative to a real leslie. My RT3/251 sits right next to it so I have done A-B comparisons. Hope this helps, until I turned down all the effects on the RT-20, I thought it was a real POS.</P>


    H101</P>

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: L-100 and Effects Pedals



      Hey TSS</p>

      I understand that you hooked up your RT-20 on the output of your main amp??</p>

      It should be connect between your preamp and your swell Pedal . That you are then able to increasing volume and not over driving you effect, RT-20.</p>

      Face your amps speaker into a corner and the choppy-ness will be reduced or better yet run the RT-20 into a active crossover and xover at somewhere between 500-700hz and the separate signals to different amp and EQ from there. Place a compressor after the EQ for the highs and adjust.</p>

      Hope this helps!
      </p>

      </p>

      </p>

      </p>

      </p>

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: L-100 and Effects Pedals



        As for overdrive - I tried effect pedals and it sounded horrid. </p>

        I suggest Zener Overdrive which is the easiest thing to do in L100.</p>

        http://organforum.com/forums/thread/90307.aspx </p>

        Cheers</p>

        Kris
        </p>
        Is:
        Nord C2

        Was:
        Hammond L122
        Leslie 147

        Website:
        L100 modifications: www.gietek.me.uk

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: L-100 and Effects Pedals

          <SPAN style="WIDOWS: 2; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; TEXT-INDENT: 0px; BORDER-COLLAPSE: separate; FONT: medium 'Times New Roman'; WHITE-SPACE: normal; ORPHANS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; COLOR: rgb(0,0,0); WORD-SPACING: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px" class=Apple-style-span>
          <P style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 8px; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(255,255,255); PADDING-LEFT: 8px; PADDING-RIGHT: 8px; FONT-FAMILY: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; PADDING-TOP: 8px">Aha!
          G'day Bassman and Ten Silver Saxes!
          Also the other lads, good to see you all again!</P>
          <P style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 8px; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(255,255,255); PADDING-LEFT: 8px; PADDING-RIGHT: 8px; FONT-FAMILY: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; PADDING-TOP: 8px">I have here another email from Kon Zissis, about Geetar Pedals, fromback when I was asking about modding the T.</P>
          <BLOCKQUOTE>
          <P style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 8px; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(255,255,255); PADDING-LEFT: 8px; PADDING-RIGHT: 8px; FONT-FAMILY: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; PADDING-TOP: 8px">"Hi Brendon.
          Basically a guitar
          unit needs to have a full frequency response in order to be used with the organ.
          Many overdrive units for guitars tend to have a passive
          bass roll off created by input capacitors or inter stage coupling capacitors
          whose uf values are too low for the ohms value of the grounding resistor wired
          just after the capacitor.

          A capacitor followed by a grounding capacitor is basically a passive high pass filter so
          therefore in order to allow the full bass response of the organ to pass through
          the particular capacitor/grounding resistor combinations, the capacitor uf values connected before the grounding
          resistor must not be any lower than uf values shown with the grounding resistor ohms values shown here below:

          Capacitor Grounding resistor
          1.4 pf 16384 mega ohms
          2.08 pf 8192 mega ohms
          4.155 uf 4096 mega ohms
          8.31 pf 2048 mega ohms

          16.625 pf 1024 mega ohms
          31.25 pf 512 mega ohms
          62.5 pf 256 mega ohms

          125 pf 128 mega ohms<SPAN class=Apple-converted-space></SPAN>
          300 pf 64 mega ohms
          600 pf 32 mega ohms

          0.0012 uf ( 1.2 nf ) 16 mega ohms
          0.0025 uf (2.5 nf
          ) 8 mega ogms
          0.005 uf ( 5 nf
          ) 4 mega ohms

          0.01 uf ( 10 nf ) 2 mega ohms<SPAN class=Apple-converted-space></SPAN>
          0.02 uf ( 20 nf ) 1 mega ohms
          0.04 uf ( 40 uf ) 500 K ohms
          0.08 uf ( 80 nf ) 250 K ohms

          0.160 uf ( 160 nf ) 125 K ohms
          0.320 uf ( 320 nf ) 62.5 K ohms
          0.640 uf ( 640 nf ) 31.25 K ohms

          1.280 uf 15.62 K ohms
          2.56 uf 7.81 K ohms
          5.12 uf 3.9 K ohms

          10.24 uf 1.95 K ohms
          20.48 uf 975 ohms
          40.96 uf 487.5 ohms
          81.92 uf 243.75 ohms<SPAN class=Apple-converted-space></SPAN>

          163.84 uf 121.88 ohms
          327.68 uf 60.94 ohms
          655.36 uf 30.47 ohms

          1310.72 uf 15.24 ohms
          2621.44 uf 7.62 ohms
          5242.88 uf 3.81 ohms

          10485.76 uf 1.905 ohms
          20971.52 uf 0.95 ohm

          The above chart is a comprehensive chart with ridiculous
          or unavailable resistor ultra mega ohms values shown early in the chart , and
          in the real world the most common capacitor uf values used before the grounding
          resistor or the volume control potentiometer in valve circuits are usually
          between the range of 500 pf or 0.001 uf
          ( 1 nf ) or 0.0022 uf ( 2.2 nf ) or 0.01 uf ( 10 nf ) or 0.022 uf ( 22 nf ) or 0.047 uf ( 47 nf )
          or 0.1 uf ( 100 nf ).

          The valve circuits that allow the full bass response to pass usually use 0.022
          uf (22 nf) capacitors with 1 mega ohms grounding resistors or 0.047 uf ( 47 nf
          ) with 500 K grounding resistors .

          In the vintage Marshall 100 watt Super Lead amplifiers,
          the Normal(full bass) channel uses a 0.022 uf ( 22 nf ) inter stage coupling
          capacitor before the 1 mega ohms Normal channel volume control , and the High
          Treble ( lead ) channel which rolls off the bass response uses a 0.0022 uf ( 2.2 nf ) inter stage coupling capacitor
          before the 1 mega ohms Normal Channel
          volume control.

          The Bright channel of the vintage Vox AC-30 Top Boost
          amplifier rolls off the bass even more
          than the Marshall by using a 500 pf inter stage coupling capacitor before the
          500 K ohms Treble channel volume control.

          These bass roll off effect of these capacitor / grounding
          resistor combinations are extremely
          important if you want the overdrive unit to produce a similar grunty but not
          too muddy sounding overdrive effect as the High Treble channel of the
          vintage Marshall Super Lead or the Bright channel of the Vox AC-30 Top Boost
          amplifiers.<SPAN class=Apple-converted-space></SPAN>
          These capacitor/ grounding resistance combinations in the
          Marshall Super Lead and the Vox AC-30 Top Boost amplifiers sound great for
          electric guitars but they would make an organ sound very thin with much less
          bottom end response so therefore you would need to connect the organ to the
          Normal channel in order to hear the full bass response.<SPAN class=Apple-converted-space></SPAN>

          Many guitarists like the sound of the overdriven guitars
          with the bass roll off produced in the lead channels but Eric Clapton used to
          use the Normal channel of his Marshall Super Lead amplifiers during his years in Cream so therefore if you want to get the nice and
          fat sounding Eric Clapton Cream sound , you would need to use a Gibson Les Paul
          or a Gibson 335 or a Gibson SG guitar through the Normal channel of the
          Marshall Super Lead and with the Bass, Middle , Treble and Presence controls
          all set to the full setting.<SPAN class=Apple-converted-space></SPAN>
          Connecting a Hammond organ to the Normal channel of the
          Marshall amplifier will help to produce the Jon Lord C3 through the Marshall
          sound , however Jon Lord apparently used the Marshall 1968 100 watt PA amplifier which was intended to produce a
          full bass response with all of the channels.

          ....</P>
          <P style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 8px; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(255,255,255); PADDING-LEFT: 8px; PADDING-RIGHT: 8px; FONT-FAMILY: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; PADDING-TOP: 8px">All the best.
          Kon."</P>
          <P style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 8px; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(255,255,255); PADDING-LEFT: 8px; PADDING-RIGHT: 8px; FONT-FAMILY: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; PADDING-TOP: 8px">I can't even remember all what was in there, but it may be of use to you.</P>
          <P style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 8px; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(255,255,255); PADDING-LEFT: 8px; PADDING-RIGHT: 8px; FONT-FAMILY: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; PADDING-TOP: 8px">Also take a peek at http://www.generalguitargadgets.com/...&amp;Itemid=26
          for starters, think about the possibility of buiding yourown FX into the organ....</P>
          <P style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 8px; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(255,255,255); PADDING-LEFT: 8px; PADDING-RIGHT: 8px; FONT-FAMILY: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; PADDING-TOP: 8px">Right, back to work!</P>
          <P style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 8px; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(255,255,255); PADDING-LEFT: 8px; PADDING-RIGHT: 8px; FONT-FAMILY: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; PADDING-TOP: 8px">Cheers!</P>
          <P style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 8px; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(255,255,255); PADDING-LEFT: 8px; PADDING-RIGHT: 8px; FONT-FAMILY: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; PADDING-TOP: 8px">-Brendoon<SPAN class=Apple-converted-space></SPAN>
          </P></BLOCKQUOTE>
          <P style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 8px; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(255,255,255); PADDING-LEFT: 8px; PADDING-RIGHT: 8px; FONT-FAMILY: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; PADDING-TOP: 8px" mce_keep="true"></P>
          <P style="PADDING-BOTTOM: 8px; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(255,255,255); PADDING-LEFT: 8px; PADDING-RIGHT: 8px; FONT-FAMILY: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; PADDING-TOP: 8px" mce_keep="true"></P></SPAN>
          -1958 Hofner 550 archtop guitar -1959 C3 and PR40- -1964 Busillachio Harmonium- -1964 M101-
          -1967ish Leslie 122- -1975 T500 (modded..chopped, and reassembled!)-
          -DIY 760 FrankenLeslie/rat hideout-
          -1980 Electrokey Electric Piano- -Yamaha electric Harmonium (early 80's?)-
          -1990 Jansen GMF150 amp- -1992 Korg 01W/fd- -1992 G&L S-500 geetar.

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