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HELP and ADVICE for a Newbie purchasing an A100

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    HELP and ADVICE for a Newbie purchasing an A100

    HELP and ADVICE for a Newbie purchasing an A100

    I hope to travel from Canada to Maine to pick up an A100 and Leslie. In June, 2019, I heard the Youth Pastor play the organ and it works well - as does the Leslie. But, he told me they had removed a 'tube' to cancel the sound to the internal speakers and use only the Leslie as the speaker. It sounded great. He thought he could find the missing tube - but he hasn't been able to find it. Does anyone know what tube I should be looking for and can they still be purchased from someone - somewhere? I may not always have room for the Leslie - so I want to be able to use the internal speakers.

    Does anyone know if an electronics guy would be able to install a headphone jack on the A100? Is that a possibiltiy?

    Also, what are some basic things I need to be aware of as I look forward to my first vintage Hammond? Years ago I had an L100 for a year or two and then upgraded to the more modern organs of the 80's.... but I would like to invest in an A100 and maintain it. I have a friend who is a bit of a techie and he might be able to figure out things that need to be done - if he has the schematics and if he comes to this forum for help. However, other than investing in Caig Labs Deoxit D5 and Hammond Tone Generator Oil, what else should I consider?

    Also, for transporting the organ in a van, what precautions should I take?

    Thanks so much.
    Peter

    #2
    The first thing to do is lock down the tone generator before moving it. There are four bolts that go in from the bottom that have special "T" shaped sleeves. Two are accessed from the front of the organ and two from inside the rear. You take the bolts out then flip the special sleeves over so the large end faces the generator then tighten them down. Shouldn't be hard to replace the missing tube, if you have or can get a picture of the amp with the missing tube we can tell you which one it is.

    edit: For transport, the bolts and sleeves go in like this: And, congratulations on your new A100 & Leslie!
    Attached Files
    Tom in Tulsa

    Fooling with: 1969 E100, 1955 M3, 1963 M100, Leslie 720

    Comment


    • Yasmar
      Yasmar commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks very much for this information on locking down the generator and the attached picture. Very helpful.

    #3
    The missing tube should be a 5U4GB. Very common and still made in Russia.

    To repeat what tpappano said, it's especially important in A100s to lock down the tone generator before transporting it. The physical orientation of manuals and tone generator in A100s is slightly different from B3s and C3s, and this makes them more vulnerable to broken harness wires if moved without locking the TG.

    Yes, you can install headphones.

    For moving, try to borrow or rent some Roll-Or-Kari dollies. This will make the job 100x easier than it would be just trying to muscle the organ by hand.
    I'm David. 'Dave' is someone else's name.

    Comment


    • Yasmar
      Yasmar commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks for the info on the missing tube. Very helpful. Also, it is good to know that someone could install headphones - should the organ music become bothersome to other house dwellers or guests.

    #4
    And, at about 400 lbs, secure that 'lil gal in the van so she can't possibly fall over 8). Around here Roll-Or-Karis rent for about $25 a day, money *very* well spent!
    Tom in Tulsa

    Fooling with: 1969 E100, 1955 M3, 1963 M100, Leslie 720

    Comment


    • Yasmar
      Yasmar commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks. We will fasten it well. I called around today for Roll-or-Karis, but music stores and moving companies didn't know what I was talking about . Clearly, where we live, there hasn't been too much Hammond Organ activity in the last 25 years. So, we may have to settle for muscle power and sorebacks.

    • David Anderson
      David Anderson commented
      Editing a comment
      See if there's anyone in your area that specializes in piano moving. They may have some.

    • tpappano
      tpappano commented
      Editing a comment
      And check with "equipment rental companies", the ones that rent jack hammers, cement mixers, nail guns, etc. They're the ones who had them here. They might also just call them "piano dollies" or some such and not actually know the brand name 8)

    #5
    Hammond Tonewheel Oil 4oz

    Just searched ebay for Hammond Tonewheel Generator Oil - if you can see the screenshot of the ebay price - the total (in Canadian dollars) comes close to $60 - most of which is shipping. Two questions:
    1. Realistically, how much tonewheel oil will I go through in the next two years - 4oz? 8oz? I don't have any idea how many ounces would be required to fill the "well" - assuming it was dry. When I am purchasing my first supply - how much should I buy?
    2. If there are any Canadian vintage organ aficionados on this forum - is there any place in Canada where I can order the preferred oil?
    Thanks again.

    Comment


    • Yasmar
      Yasmar commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks, David Anderson for your suggestion!

    #6
    Go to the website for tonewheel general hospital for most all your needs. Get a reprinted service manual. Some will grind their teeth, but some people use singer sewing machine oil. Early model Hammonds have printed on the oiling plate that Nujol is a suitable substitute, medical grade mineral oil. I have used it with no ill effects. Others prefer turbine oil. Depends on how much you want to spend vs availability. This oil is a huge historic and ongoing debate with opinions raging much like politics. Use your head and avoid motor oil, olive oil, etc etc as we here have seen it all. I think you could probably get by with sewing or mineral oil rather than spend $60 for freight. Save the money for other needed parts.
    Larry K
    Princeton, IL

    Hammond BV+DR-20, Mathushek Square piano from 1934
    Retired: Hammond L-102, M-3, S-6, H-112, B-2+21H+PR-40, B-3+21H, Hammond Aurora Custom, Colonnade.

    Comment


    • Yasmar
      Yasmar commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks. In reading stuff on this forum and other places - I know what you mean about the debate over what works best!

    #7
    The 5U4GB rectifier tube that is typically removed to kill the internal speakers is the large tube in the back of the power amp which is on the far right of the lower shelf in this photo of the back of an A-100.

    http://www.gennlab.com/24_A100_Rear_Open_1.jpg

    As for a line out, I built this one for my A-100 and it works fine:

    http://www.hammondtoday.com/wp-conte...11/Lineout.jpg

    Info on a headphone jack circuit can be found here: https://organforum.com/forums/forum/electronic-organs-midi/hammond-organs/33472-headphone-circuit-for-a-100 Unfortunately, a line level jack will typically be too weak to drive the headphones (although you could buy a headphone amp, but I don't think the reverb signal will pass through this way, as it would with the 50-year-old circuit in the link above).

    Comment


    • Yasmar
      Yasmar commented
      Editing a comment
      Very helpful. I will be sharing these links and posts with the technical person I hope might volunteer to help me with this project.

    #8
    The Trek II OBL-2-2 is a mighty fine product to achieve line out with reverb. Worth every penny, and not to have to fuss with a build of your own (especially if this is your first Hammond, I would buy the most reliable accessories possible to rule them out in case of difficulty.)

    EDIT: I've not tried this but I'm sure with a mono/stereo adapter, these can drive headphones just fine. If not, find a headphone preamp of your choice to run the signal into.

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