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H-195 No Pedal & Other Problems

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  • H-195 No Pedal & Other Problems

    I am new to the Hammond world with a recently acquired H195 that I have done all I can with no electrical engineering experience. So I’m reaching out to the experts! I put gear oil in yesterday and impatiently waiting for that to quiet things down. I hope it will bc it’s pretty loud now so I only run it to test different things then back off again...I attached the pedals but nothing. Vibrato Reverb Celeste don’t seem to work. Drawbars and keys all good after spraying cleaner in there. I don’t know how to test anything else or what to do. Am I making a mistake or is this a worthwhile project? Please let me know from your experience what I should do next!

    thanks
    mike

  • #2
    Gear oil? Not hammond oil or medical mineral oil?
    Larry K

    Hammond BV+22H+DR-20, Celviano for piano practice
    Retired: Hammond L-102, M-3, S-6, H-112, B-2+21H+PR-40, B-3+21H, Hammond Aurora Custom, Colonnade.

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    • #3
      from one who saw quite a number of H's back in the day - you have your hands full. For instance, the pedals were always fun b/c of the cute key-down detect/priority circuit. Also, a variety of vacuum tubes in a variety of circuits for the variety of functions.
      ditto handyczech on using the right oil, BTW

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      • #4
        Sorry I was typing too fast. I DID USE Hammond Gear Oil. And a quick update the T.G. is super quiet now yay! My next problem is there’s no vibrato chorus or reverb. I can’t find the scanner? Any help is appreciated thank you!

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        • #5
          Edit - I mean Generator Oil 🤦🏻

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          • #6
            I picked up an H100 as the "booby-prize" to cart away when I collected it's attached 'decorator' Leslies (a 247 and a 258 bass cabinet). When I opened the H100 up, my first thoughts were "Pity the poor beggar that is called out to service one of those...". I didn't waste any time on even thinking about trying to fix it up, but rather, thought "How can we simplify this stuff and bring it to use?". You have said "Drawbars and keys are good...", TG is obviously OK after oiling, so why not build on the good that is in there rather than try to fix the bad?

            I chose to work on converting mine into what will eventually be a "Passive chop" (I have previously done this to an L100). In other words, all that is left of it after stripping out is the TG and Run Motor, drawbars and manuals to be connected to one of the matching transformers with the drawbar modules then interconnected between upper and lower (see pics). It then gives you a good base to work from. Sure, you have lost reverb and perc but you can recover some of this using a pedal chain plus that also opens up other options. The TG in the H100 is excellent in that it "goes all the way down" on bass signal and you can also trim out the upper frequency shrillness. There are also a number of mods that can be applied to make it all sound 'fatter'.

            Some people will tell you that an H-series is a "modder's dream". Others would say that if it doesn't have waterfall keys, it's not worth touching. What I can say, is that once you have cleared out all of the bolt on crap that these organs came with, you can then differentiate the wood from the trees and see that there is probably something worthwhile under there. Some interim piccies attached before physically cutting this cabinet. I have no qualms about 'chopping' this cabinet because I see little aesthetic quality in it (to me, it is a poor quality build eyesore). Equally, I would say that if I can give this organ an extended useful playing life, then that is a good thing. I am sure that there are others who will disagree strongly with my views - but each to their own.

            Note: I also cut the Tab panel at the fold between drawbars and plastic tabs with an angle grinder (and then filed smooth for safety) to provide and maintain a clean finish/cover between drawbars and the 'to be" replacement top panel.

            Interestingly, you can see in the first picture that this organ came with a burned out PSU (burn mark left on the PSU chassis undershield). I suspect that without that shield, this organ would have been a candidate for self immolation!


            Just an alternate view....
            Cheers.

            PS: I would also add the caveat, don't venture down this path unless you have the basic skills to complete the journey...
            Attached Files
            Last edited by peterb_2795; 07-19-2020, 12:18 AM. Reason: corrected typo's
            1966 C-3 / 925
            1965 M102 / 145
            1967 M111A / 330

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            • andyg
              andyg commented
              Editing a comment
              Interesting about the two leslies. The 258 isn't a bass cabinet but actually the Thomas-specific non-rotary cabinet that Thomas commissioned for their 'Electra' model in the late 1960s. It came as one of pair of matching 'decorator' cabinets, the other being the 257. This was basically a 247 but with different pin-outs. I wondered if you haven't got that 257/258 pair?

            • peterb_2795
              peterb_2795 commented
              Editing a comment
              It was definitely a 247/258 mix. I also understood the 258 to come from a typical 257/258 pair, but in this case, the 258 was custom wired from the organ bass into the 9 pin connector on the first of the two (147-like amps) in the 258. Those two amps will be refurb'd and rewired as 147 amps minus motor switching which can readily be performed external to the amplifiers.

          • #7
            If you haven't played an H100 in restored condition, personally I don't think you can comment

            When sorted out, which is a little time consuming, but neither difficult nor expensive, it comfortably outplays the simpler, and more popular ABCs... And I have both. And an E100 (also hugely underrated, and much simpler of course)

            Don't give up... Keep reading the old posts on here and print out the full circuit diagrams

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            • #8
              For inspiration in repair work...



              ​​​​​​... And here's the last one i did

              Last edited by Admin; 07-19-2020, 06:37 AM. Reason: embedded videos

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              • #9
                Originally posted by Daniel777 View Post
                If you haven't played an H100 in restored condition, personally I don't think you can comment
                As I stated, "but each to their own"... another example of "Cancel culture". I will avoid further comment so as not to be engaged in any "flame" wars...
                Attached Files
                1966 C-3 / 925
                1965 M102 / 145
                1967 M111A / 330

                Comment


                • #10
                  You won't find much flaming on Organ Forum, outside of the 'Grease Pit'. It's against forum rules and moderators will act as required!
                  It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

                  New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

                  Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
                  Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
                  Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
                  Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    andyg: pictures of the back plates from the 247/258 pair retrieved from an aged (but interesting history) studio in Sydney. Also, the amplifier pair as found in the 258. Finding two amplifiers in one cabinet was like finding gold. This was in addition to the 'spare' valves that were given to me ( a number of NOS GE 6550A's and a pair of Tungsols all in addition to the GE's that were in the 258 and the TS's that were in the 147. I was left speechless at the 6550's...
                    Attached Files
                    1966 C-3 / 925
                    1965 M102 / 145
                    1967 M111A / 330

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      Wonderful find...

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                      • #13
                        I appreciate all the encouraging comments! I also like the modification ideas IF I can’t find a way to restore it to its original glory. Watching the videos of how they can sound inspired me - I have so much to learn.

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                        • #14
                          Having owned 2 Thomas Electras, I'm well acquainted with the 257/258 cabinets. One Electra was used on the road and I went a step further and bought another 247, which made the 9 Tibia tabs scream. And I was always fascinated by the 258, with its twin 147 amps, bi-amped with an active crossover. Great bass.
                          I also cut my teeth on the H100 series and appreciate its qualities, even if they sometimes come at a price. I appreciate that the footages go all the way down and also like the added footages. Waterfall or diving board--I really don't care. I can do without eh cymbal and brush effects (When I first played one--I think I was 12--I asked the sales lady if the effect was escaping steam...) The expanded percussion is nice although some of them (the banjo) suck. And as a serviceman I have to be honest: I absolutely hate those tab switches. They're difficult to clean, difficult to troubleshoot, and you'll tear up your fingers on all the crappy solder joints trying to. I once had a project rebuilding an X77 and completely replaced the tab rail with a custom built jobby, and even though the project went belly up and I parted the thing out, I still have the panel saved in my shop.

                          I currently have an H300-something (the one with the rhythm unit) that has been a royal pain to get working, but worth the effort. I have long since given up on the pedal sustain system on both the H series and the X77 (I've owned 4 of those. I just love the cabinet design and chrome pedals), and on my last X77, which I also used on the road, and with this H I now have, I've installed a Trek II string bass unit. Yes, I play pedals rather than left-hand bass. Anyway, any H is going to need a variety of parts replaced: PSU caps, of course. Pretty much any electrolytic you find, plus all the 1.0uf caps on the small PC boards. Your inoperative reverb might be the springs; they tend to get jossled and get unhooked. The vibrato/chorus problem could be any number of things. Having rescued maybe 10 or so of them over the years, I've found it best to start with the caps, then the tubes, then maybe replace and upgrade any transistors. The female pins in the Molex connectors can widen over time and create a loose or intermittent connection and require checking. Ground wires can become loose and create hum.
                          Oh, some H's had a bad run of keys and you might find that some of them have cracked mounting collars where the plastic key is bolted to the channel. Just FYI...

                          H's can be a lot of fun. They will never sound like a B3, but that's okay too. I'll be interested to see how your chop progresses. Best of luck.
                          Over the years: Hammond M3, BC, M102, B3, four X77s and three PR-40s, a Thomas Electra and a Celebrity, three Fender Rhodes, Roland HS-10, HP-2000, HP-600, RD-600, JV-880, a thing made by Korg (?), two Leslie 910s, 122, 257, 258, 247, two 142s, and three custom-built Leslies. Wow, way too much money spent!

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