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122 reluctant to change speeds

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  • 122 reluctant to change speeds



    Greetings everyone,</p>

    I'm having a confusing issue with my Leslie 122--most of the time it works just fine, but occasionally it will get stuck on a certain speed. Usually it gets stuck on either the fast speed (more common) or the slow speed, but sometimes it will spin only at some intermediate speed between the slow and fast speed.</p>

    The first time I noticed this was at a gig where, after some investigating, I found out that the voltage output at the club was slightly unusual (below 110 Volts). There may have been other issues with the power outlets as everyone in the band had funny issues occurring with their equipment (except the drummer, of course).
    </p>

    This problem hasn't occurred at any other venues since, but it does occur at the house I just moved into. I measured the voltage from the outlets and it registered at the typical American household voltage of 120 Volts. I know the organ and Leslie should take 117 Volts...</p>

    Another strange bit to add is that, while at home or even while I was at the club with the funky power situation, the issue was momentary. That is, there would be a period of time where everything worked as it should and then, unpredictably, it would stick on a certain speed. After being stuck for an expanse of time, it would start changing again like normal.
    </p>

    Would a voltage mismatch possibly cause such a problem? It could be the switch, but I imagine that if the switch were the issue then it would never change speeds properly. The thing that sticks out to me is how the organ and Leslie work just fine--the issue is only present in my new house and in that obscure club (and even then it was only momentary).</p>

    Here's another twist in the knot: when I noticed the issue occurring at the club with the strange power situation, I switched out my 122 for my backup Leslie, and it had the exact same behavior... So I don't think it's on the side of the Leslie. That might leave the switch as the issue, or something else organ-side, or perhaps it's the power at the house.</p>

    Any ideas?</p>

    Thanks!
    </p>

  • #2
    Re: 122 reluctant to change speeds

    Some Leslies have motors that the rotor in the motor slides so as to engage/disengage with a gear for the fast slow. If yours does this, check that bearings haven't varnished preventing the free movement.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: 122 reluctant to change speeds



      Gary,</P>


      I would clean the contacts starting with the Half Moon at the console if so equiped. Clean Leslie connector socket and all cable pins. Use DeOxit D5. If you have a back up Leslie cable you might try that as well.</P>


      All of the above may not apply (except cable and connectors) if you are using a Hammond clone (XK or similar). The problem may then be with the instrument and much more difficult to find. I don't think it is a Leslie motor issue as Freddy suggests since your back up Leslie does the same thing but hey, I've been wrong before.</P>


      I don't think it is a power issue at home either. 120VAC should be just dandy. The fact that this only has happened at home and the funky power bar are most likey just coincidence unless there is another component common to only those two locations, a cable for example.</P>


      Best,</P>


      H101</P>

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: 122 reluctant to change speeds



        Thanks H101 and Fredy!</p>

        The Leslie is of the class you've mentioned, Fredy. My secondary Leslie is not of this class, but I'll check the bearing nonetheless. Thanks for the suggestion.</p>

        And I don't know why it didn't even occur to me to clean the contacts! I'll try that out.</p>

        Oh, and I'm using an A-100, so all of the suggestions given definitely apply.</p>

        I'll let you guys know if that solves the issue.</p>

        Thanks again!

        </p>

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: 122 reluctant to change speeds



          You might also check the 12AU7 tube that controls speed switching in the 122's amp.</P>


          John</P>

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: 122 reluctant to change speeds



            In addition to checking the 12AU7 that drives the relay for slow/fast also check C3 and C4 which are .1 mfd noise suppressor capsacross the relay contactsthat could short and give intermittent action. Not sure where they are mounted. An additional thing is the voltage regulator tube... but normally that would affect audio quality... but one can never tell. This tube is used in an unconventional manner as a series voltage drop from 430 to 310 volts that feeds among other things the relay and driver amp stages.</P>


            A REAL long shot is possible radio frequency interference to the 12AU7 relay driver. Local radio transmitters COULD get into this and self rectify in the tube and cause intermittentaction. The tube is used in a very poor engineering design in regards to interference. USUALLY you would notice the effects oof RFI in the amp as well, but this type problem can be insidious to find.</P>

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: 122 reluctant to change speeds

              If it's still got a relay, I would check it to see if it's sticking. The contacts arc with every speed change. The arcing causes pitting on the surface of the contacts, which could cause intermittent sticking. Unless anyone suggests otherwise, I would use a very fine grit of sandpaper (like 400 or more) to lightly sand the contacts.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: 122 reluctant to change speeds



                Another thing is that on DC relays such as this, rust or metal particles can get between the pole pieces and cause sticking or no action... and since it is mechanical movement, can be intermitent.</P>


                Clean pole pieces and area of any magnetic material. Put CRC 226 on the metal to prevent further rusting.</P>

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