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I don't believe it!

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  • I don't believe it!

    One year ago I found this lovely house. The previous occupants had removed all their belongings and the house was ready for refurbishment. The only item I found in the entire house was a funny-looking key. It probably got thrown away.
    In February I bought my first Hammond organ - a T500 "Institutional" model.
    This morning I found that funny key, and out of curiosity inserted it into the keyhole of the Hammond... and turned it! It's the key! Now how is that for a coincidence?
    Click image for larger version

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  • #2
    Amazing. What are the odds of that happening?
    -------

    Hammond M-102 #21000.
    Leslie 147 #F7453.
    Hammond S-6 #72421

    Comment


    • #3
      It's not my desire to be cruel or kill your joy.
      Enjoy the amazement for a bit - at least while you can.
      Instrument locks are right up there with paper towel holders in security. Just there to keep fiddling urchins' fingers off.
      These locks, especially of this design, will turn with just about anything inserted in them that will actuate the cam at the back.
      They're not like ignition locks or even door locks.
      Sorry.
      While convenient, the cosmos wasn't involved, exactly.
      But the fact it works AT ALL is a big plus. Finding the "correct" key for these kinds of locks is generally far more hassle than it's worth.

      Comment


      • #4
        Well, the key does have a fancy edge cut to it, or is that just for decoration?
        Never mind, it was just such a surprise, particularly as the key doesn't even have "Hammond" on it, but "Burg Wachter" which is a german locksmiths.
        I was surprised to even find the key after a year - it was under a box of books.

        All together now, "It's coming home, it's coming home, it's coming, Hammond's coming home..." (For those who believe it was meant to be.)

        Comment


        • #5
          Looking at the picture, the head (or bow) of the key is shaped like a brand name called "Corbin" here in the states. But I know little of Euro locks.
          Of course, the head can be shaped like anything as it's entirely ornamental.
          The 'fancy cut edge' to the right - called the "bitting" of the key - is the business end of things that distinguished keyway, function, etc. The key is clearly for a wafer style cylinder. That would include such locks as desks, boxes, mailbox, possibly a lightweight padlock, trophy case lock, and that genre of hardware.
          It is very unlikely the lock on your Hammond would contain such internal components.
          Just for grins, you could conduct a harmless experiment. With a match, hold the bitting end into the smoke and let it get some color to it. Not heat, just smoke. Insert the key; turn the lock; extract the key. Now see where the smoke is rubbed off. That's where it's hitting the internal components.
          My guess from here would be only the last millimeter or two of the tip is even touching anything. But that's a 7,000 mile guess from faraway.

          Comment


          • JamesOrgan
            JamesOrgan commented
            Editing a comment
            When I first saw the key I thought it was for a bank security box, and was hoping I might discover some long-lost treasure, like in a Hollywood movie. I'll play around with it tomorrow - thanks for the info about locks! I hope you've read some John Le Carre - a big fan of Banham locks!

        • #6
          I really like the looks of that key. Shadow box kind of material. Happy for you. I have a little story. When I discovered a 55 B3 for sale at a home in Dillon, Montana, it was really in very good shape, and had been handed down from mother to daughter to daughter. In the organ bench (this is the discovery part) there was a black and white photograph of a new bride, whose parents, in 1956, had bought the B3 as a wedding present for her, and the B3 is in the background. The seller was quite happy to let me keep the provenance. Oil, a TG capping, and it is very much like new in many regards. But it's the story and history and quality and echoes of eras past that create a feeling for the brand and the instrument. And Hammond should have designed their keys to look like yours!
          1955 B3, Leslie 21H and 147. Hammond A100 with weird Leslie 205. 1976 Rhodes. Wurlitzer 200A. Yamaha DX7/TX7. Korg M1. Yamaha C3 grand, 67 Tele blond neck, Les Paul Standard, PRS 24, Gibson classical electric, Breedlove acoustic electric, Strat, P Bass, Rogers drum kit, Roland TD 12 digital drums, Apollo quad, older blackfaced Fender Twin, other amps, mics and bits and pieces cluttering up the "studio."

          Comment


          • JamesOrgan
            JamesOrgan commented
            Editing a comment
            That's a lovely story. Somebody had a great sense of occasion to arrange the photo.

        • #7
          Thanks for the comment. Not just a wooden box....
          1955 B3, Leslie 21H and 147. Hammond A100 with weird Leslie 205. 1976 Rhodes. Wurlitzer 200A. Yamaha DX7/TX7. Korg M1. Yamaha C3 grand, 67 Tele blond neck, Les Paul Standard, PRS 24, Gibson classical electric, Breedlove acoustic electric, Strat, P Bass, Rogers drum kit, Roland TD 12 digital drums, Apollo quad, older blackfaced Fender Twin, other amps, mics and bits and pieces cluttering up the "studio."

          Comment


          • #8
            So, can somebody find a picture of an original Hammond T500 key?
            -------

            Hammond M-102 #21000.
            Leslie 147 #F7453.
            Hammond S-6 #72421

            Comment


            • #9
              Unless I am mistaken by the location indicators or lack thereof on some responders, this is a Hammond Europe product. The last institutional T series to leave the original USA factory was the T-262. To the best of my humble knowledge, the auto rhythm units were never produced here for the church market, The T-262 had a rather ordinary skeleton-like key. Andy in the UK may have some thoughts, but the German locksmith mark probably indicates a rather generic to the area desk drawer lock, not something special made just for the organ as the volume would be too low, as Andy may confirm.
              Larry K

              Hammond BV+22H+DR-20, Celviano for piano practice
              Retired: Hammond L-102, M-3, S-6, H-112, B-2+21H+PR-40, B-3+21H, Hammond Aurora Custom, Colonnade.

              Comment


              • JamesOrgan
                JamesOrgan commented
                Editing a comment
                I took the lock itself out yesterday - it's made in Germany!

              • JamesOrgan
                JamesOrgan commented
                Editing a comment
                That doesn't surprise me. Mine was constructed in Denmark - the Andresen music business is still going strong.

            • #10
              You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 1 photos.
              C2 1953, as old as I am and 760 rebuilt, Custom M3 1955, custom HX3, Hohner OAB, Ventilator, Service for friends on A100, B3, BV, M100 and some Leslies

              Comment


              • #11
                The right one is T500
                C2 1953, as old as I am and 760 rebuilt, Custom M3 1955, custom HX3, Hohner OAB, Ventilator, Service for friends on A100, B3, BV, M100 and some Leslies

                Comment


                • #12
                  Originally posted by Hoaxel View Post
                  The right one is T500
                  Good work! So it seems it's a simple lock after all as suggested by others earlier.
                  -------

                  Hammond M-102 #21000.
                  Leslie 147 #F7453.
                  Hammond S-6 #72421

                  Comment


                  • #13
                    Sort of a related key story. I found a Technics SX-FN3 on Facebook Marketplace and made arrangements to go pick it up. The daughter of the original owner was there, the organ was free, no one plays, just get it out here. When I got it home yesterday, plugged it in and took it for a test drive, everything was totally operational, no flaws. And the key was in it's original envelop taped to the lid of the bench, right next to all the documentation(owners manuals etc).
                    Current inventory.
                    Yamaha HX-1, FX-20,Hammond Colonnade w/ Leslie 720, Hammond CX-3000
                    Roland AT-90SLW, Technics SX- FN3(2), Technics SX-FA1,F100 Yamaha Tyros 5, PSR 910.

                    Comment


                    • gtc
                      gtc commented
                      Editing a comment
                      One owner. Low mileage. Only driven on Sundays.

                      Nice score!

                    • JamesOrgan
                      JamesOrgan commented
                      Editing a comment
                      When I got my L103 it included the purchase certificate from 1963 and the oiling chart. The certificate was filled in with the buyer's name, etc.
                      The oiling chart? Absolutely mint!

                  • #14
                    Originally posted by Hoaxel View Post
                    The right one is T500
                    And you have a Burg Wachter key!

                    Comment


                    • #15
                      Originally posted by tiredoldgeezer View Post
                      Looking at the picture, the head (or bow) of the key is shaped like a brand name called "Corbin" here in the states. But I know little of Euro locks.
                      Of course, the head can be shaped like anything as it's entirely ornamental.
                      The 'fancy cut edge' to the right - called the "bitting" of the key - is the business end of things that distinguished keyway, function, etc. The key is clearly for a wafer style cylinder. That would include such locks as desks, boxes, mailbox, possibly a lightweight padlock, trophy case lock, and that genre of hardware.
                      It is very unlikely the lock on your Hammond would contain such internal components.
                      Just for grins, you could conduct a harmless experiment. With a match, hold the bitting end into the smoke and let it get some color to it. Not heat, just smoke. Insert the key; turn the lock; extract the key. Now see where the smoke is rubbed off. That's where it's hitting the internal components.
                      My guess from here would be only the last millimeter or two of the tip is even touching anything. But that's a 7,000 mile guess from faraway.
                      I took the lock out yesterday to test your theory - you're right. The lock has just a simple triangular hole. Still, it was good while it lasted.
                      Now here's another story about coincidence - when I was in the USA about 20 years ago... (Continued on Page 94)

                      Comment


                      • tiredoldgeezer
                        tiredoldgeezer commented
                        Editing a comment
                        great story ... brought tears to my eyes......🤣
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