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moving a Hammond Console organ upside down?

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  • moving a Hammond Console organ upside down?

    I have heard that as long as you lock down the tone generator (and perhaps make sure the tubes are sufficiently seated), it is okay to transport an organ on it's side or back, as is sometimes necessary to fit into vehicles or through narrow openings.
    I have done some 3-d modelling of my basement stairs, and it might work to tilt an RT-3 (gluten for punishment, right?) on it's side and then tilt it to go down the stairs the right way up. The geometry, however, favors doing it so that it ends up taking the stairs upside down (one added advantage being that the weight would be on the bottom).
    Does anybody know any reason not to do this?
    Also the locking top has a lip that projects. Removing it (the whole locking top) would give more wiggle room and less weight, but I suspect that might also not be a good idea (as components might be mounted to it, it might provide necessary rigidity, it might be too difficult to do....)
    I hope to see the instrument soon and will take a critical measurement from top rear edge to the lower front edge of the keyboard (unless someone happens to have that handy :) )
    I will also have a minimum of 4 strong adults and plenty of lifting straps, as I believe it will be about 400 pounds. Click image for larger version

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    The picture shows the direction it would go in so that it would end up going down the stairs "upright".
    The attached document shows the sequence the opposite way.
    Attached Files
    Aspire to: Hammond RT-3 & Leslie
    Current: Hammond R-124; Hammond T-412; Steinway A (1905); Zuckermann Italian Virginal harpsichord.
    Past: Korg SS-1; Arp Quadra; Arp Axxe; Paia "strings & things"; Paia gnome; Paia 2720 synthesizer; Rhodes 73; 1875 Viennese grand;

  • #2
    Wowie zowie ! I am a total technical Hammond nitwit but I think I read on this forum that generator oil dripping into capacitors is detrimental.
    Mine was hoisted through the window , but this is next level.

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    • #3
      I would also take a pager towel and carefully blot up any excess oil in the scanner tub.
      Jim

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      • #4
        For a single transport, it's no big deal.
        Excess oil will be a bit messy, so the paper towel idea is worth a try.
        But there's nothing you can do to it, in the form of a free rotation in space, that will hurt anything at all. I've seen Hammonds stored on their side for a week or so with no ill effects whatsoever.
        Now long term? Sure, lots of things can happen.
        But this once (or twice coming back up) - not a thing.

        Comment


        • #5
          I would avoid letting the top of the case bear *any* weight or force while upside-down. The top is thin and only glued to the sides of the case with some wood cleats. I trailered my D152 home and the combination road vibration and 85 mph wind pressure popped some of the joints loose 8)
          Tom in Tulsa

          Fooling with: 1969 E100, 1955 M3, 1963 M100, Leslie 720

          Comment


          • #6
            tpappano 85mph? You were driving gently, but into a strong head wind, of course! 😁

            Upside down. Hmmm. Might be an idea to check that all the tubes are well seated, or to remove them all before shipment and transport them safely. Good chance to apply a bit of cleaner to the tube sockets too.
            It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

            New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

            Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
            Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
            Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
            Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

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            • #7
              Originally posted by tpappano View Post
              I would avoid letting the top of the case bear *any* weight or force while upside-down. The top is thin and only glued to the sides of the case with some wood cleats. I trailered my D152 home and the combination road vibration and 85 mph wind pressure popped some of the joints loose 8)
              Thank you!
              That is good to know! I would definitely be using the lid as the bearing surface if I tried to bring it down the stairs upside down, (and since it is glued on, removal is not a good option) but forces on it would quite likely separate it from the case. I am pretty sure I have (just) enough room to make it (down the stairs) right side up, but there is no way around tipping it on it's side to get it around the corner at the door to the stair.
              Aspire to: Hammond RT-3 & Leslie
              Current: Hammond R-124; Hammond T-412; Steinway A (1905); Zuckermann Italian Virginal harpsichord.
              Past: Korg SS-1; Arp Quadra; Arp Axxe; Paia "strings & things"; Paia gnome; Paia 2720 synthesizer; Rhodes 73; 1875 Viennese grand;

              Comment


              • #8
                I dunno. I think it might be time to look into building some rehearsal space, like myorgan
                https://organforum.com/forums/forum/...t-up-questions

                I do know when my Hammond Concorde, which is solid state, wound up in the basement, it didn't come out alive, it came out in pieces.
                After being in the moving/trucking business for 45 years, these plans don't always come out well.
                Current inventory. Yamaha HX-1,Hammond Colonnade w/ Leslie 720, Kawai XR9000, (2) Technics FN3, Tyros 5, PSR 910.
                Is that enough?

                Comment


                • KeithB
                  KeithB commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I agree. I honestly can't see putting an organ in a basement unless it has a door to the outside. The RT is a beast, and the "model" might not be accurate, then what? I'd also agree there are organs in basements that are hard to get rid of. To each his own.

              • #9
                Originally posted by beyerjf View Post
                I dunno. I think it might be time to look into building some rehearsal space, like myorgan
                https://organforum.com/forums/forum/...t-up-questions

                I do know when my Hammond Concorde, which is solid state, wound up in the basement, it didn't come out alive, it came out in pieces.
                After being in the moving/trucking business for 45 years, these plans don't always come out well.
                I certainly understand that sentiment. I have always said that if I ever became emperor, my first law would be to make it illegal to move hide-a-beds. The beast that made it down into that basement did, in fact, come out in pieces. If I do get an RT-3, however, I have decided it will be my "forever" organ.
                Aspire to: Hammond RT-3 & Leslie
                Current: Hammond R-124; Hammond T-412; Steinway A (1905); Zuckermann Italian Virginal harpsichord.
                Past: Korg SS-1; Arp Quadra; Arp Axxe; Paia "strings & things"; Paia gnome; Paia 2720 synthesizer; Rhodes 73; 1875 Viennese grand;

                Comment


                • #10
                  I hired professional movers to get my C3 into the basement. I have a Roll-or-Kari but they covered it in heavy moving blankets and strapped it upside down onto a heavy duty hand truck. There were three guys handling it and it went smoothly. I checked for any leaked oil and there was very little.
                  Hammond C-3/Leslie 122, Hammond M-102A, Vox Super Continental, Farfisa Combo Compact

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Originally posted by Austin Otto View Post
                    Click image for larger version

Name:	upright move in.jpg
Views:	169
Size:	258.1 KB
ID:	781616
                    The picture shows the direction it would go in so that it would end up going down the stairs "upright".
                    The attached document shows the sequence the opposite way.
                    Mr. Otto,

                    I might be all wet on this, but from the photo you posted (SketchUp?), it makes me wonder if you're putting the organ down the stairs to the basement backwards? To me, it looks like the main floor is on the left, and you will go down the stairs, circling to the right. If that's the direction, the front of the organ should be toward the center of the circle rather than the back. That will give you a bit of room to fit the organ around the corner.

                    Regarding the oil coming out of the cups, is it possible to cover them somehow during the move? I'm thinking perhaps a zip-lock bag (or other plastic) over the cup, held on by a rubber band. Others can weigh in on whether it will work or not.

                    Michael
                    Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
                    • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
                    • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
                    • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

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                    • #12
                      I think you might have other problems moving it downstairs because of it being so tight. I moved a few spinets downstairs and I had much more clearance than you are showing and it was quite tricky. With it being so tight we couldn't have anyone on the side so moving it was hard. We had three people of good strength. We did it but it wasn't as easy as expected. Would you be using a winch and belts to move it?
                      Hammond: Aurora Custom 227322, Colonnade 333270, T443+T582(combined), L103, Aurora Classic 246100

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                      • #13
                        Boy, a video with good audio would be priceless when you do this. The sound of a wooden step fracturing (been there, done that with a C3), drywall caving in, muffled expletives, the odd scream, and maybe even hyperventilation, the very faint but distinctive pop of an L4-5 disk rupturing. Hopefully no sobbing.

                        Balance that with hiring a good piano mover (there are several warnings here from experienced guys). Likely no drama. Boring. But you might learn some tricks to share!
                        1955 B3, Leslie 21H and 147. Hammond A100 with weird Leslie 205. 1976 Rhodes. Wurlitzer 200A. Yamaha DX7/TX7. Korg M1. Yamaha C3 grand, 67 Tele blond neck, Les Paul Standard, PRS 24, Gibson classical electric, Breedlove acoustic electric, Strat, P Bass, Rogers drum kit, Roland TD 12 digital drums, Apollo quad, older blackfaced Fender Twin, other amps, mics and bits and pieces cluttering up the "studio."

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                        • #14
                          I had it recommended to me to hire a pro for something like this, oh and most important, don’t be there when they do it !
                          Tom in Tulsa

                          Fooling with: 1969 E100, 1955 M3, 1963 M100, Leslie 720

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                          • Tonewheel
                            Tonewheel commented
                            Editing a comment
                            At least not below them?

                        • #15
                          Absolutely πŸ™‚
                          Tom in Tulsa

                          Fooling with: 1969 E100, 1955 M3, 1963 M100, Leslie 720

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