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Hammond M3 DI Help

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  • Hammond M3 DI Help



    Hey guys, </p>

       I'm pretty new to all of this. I just retrieved an old M3 I found for free on craigslist, that was scrapped pretty badly for parts. It was missing a scanner, motor, amp, and speaker. I have everything but the speaker right now. <span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Helvetica; ">I'm pretty much learning as I'm going. I wanted to ask you guys for a few tips. Since M3 was missing a speaker and amp, I bought a AO-29 preamp and am trying to figure out the best way to hook up a DI box without spending a ton of money. I want to be able to hook my organ up through one of my amps or a PA system and run some effects through it. I was looking this WikiHow page ( <span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 12px; ">http://www.wikihow.com/Install-a-Lin...Electric-Organ ) <span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px; ">on what seemed to be a very easy and inexpensive DIY project, but I looked into it more and there were a lot of warning against it (I know very little about impedance and ohms law, other than it is something to be very careful about). </span></span></span></p>

      I saw there was another alternative, a Trek II 1/4" Line Out box. But the hookups I saw  required the internal speaker. </p><p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 13.0px Helvetica">  I was reading on here (http://organforum.com/forums/thread/76364.aspx) and somebody offered a way to just hook up a Behringer Ultra DI to a AO 28. I was wondering if I could do the same thing with a AO 29. That seems to be the cheapest option. I just want to basically avoid having to buy an internal speaker if I can because they run pretty high and if I could run it through a PA or a PA speaker cabinet, it would be much much easier.</p><p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 13.0px Helvetica; min-height: 16.0px">
    </p><p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 13.0px Helvetica"> Any advice would be greatly appreciated,</p><p style="margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 13.0px Helvetica; min-height: 16.0px">
    </p>

    <span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Helvetica; ">  Thanks again!</span> </p>

  • #2
    Re: Hammond M3 DI Help

    First thing you need to determine is whether the amp configured for a PM(Permanent magnet) speaker. Earlier m3 models had a four wire speaker. If the speaker was not connected it could ruin the amp. If it is in fact a newer model with only 2 wires, you can substitute a resistor for the speaker. The rating is included with the line out schematic you mentioned. I have both models. I chopped the 2 wire organ. The four wire is my studio organ and left the speaker coil connected but disconnected the signal wires and instead sent them to line out. I use the line out circuit with the exception of the potentiometer. I then hook that output to a passive di. That pads down the signal pretty well. Then I use a balanced to unbalanced converter and send the signal to a boss rotary sim and then the stereo output to a 2 channel direct box. I just replaced my output tube and the organ sounds great out of the board with no eq.

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    • #3
      Re: Hammond M3 DI Help



      Hey,

      </p>

      Thanks for getting back to me. I know that the speaker should be a PM. I was talking to somebody else who did something similar, and he told me what I was hoping wasn't the case.... He had what looked to be roughly the same M3 model as me and said that he needed to keep his speaker in in order to match the resistance and everything. He did suggest putting in a resistor as an alternative but said when he did he almost blew out his tubes. I have to double check on whether or not I'd need a 2 or 4 wire speaker. It's looking like I'm going to need to buy a speaker regardless, and then buy some DI box... which is kinda ironic because I need a speaker that I won't even use. Might be a good idea first anyway to see if everything even runs properly before trying to hook it up to my mixing console. </p>

      You said you chopped your M3 that had 2 wires? I eventually plan to do something like that, but haven't found too much info. Just curious as how some people chop M3s with internal speakers... I'm not really sure where it could go.
      </p>

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      • #4
        Re: Hammond M3 DI Help

        I'm hoping TheAdmiral will have something to add. Do you really have to have the speaker connected no matter what with a field coil model AO-29? If so, I might be a bit screwed in my M3 chop project...
        1955 M3 (in good hands!)
        1962 A100
        1942 BC
        too many other keyboards...

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        • #5
          Re: Hammond M3 DI Help



          [quote user="redoctoberff"]I'm hoping TheAdmiral will have something to add. Do you really have to have the speaker connected no matter what with a field coil model AO-29? If so, I might be a bit screwed in my M3 chop project...[/quote]</p>

          First, AO-29 is not enough. What is the full number and letter suffix, if any? AO-29-??? That will determine whether you have PM or FC and that is most important.</p>

          On FC (4 wire speakers) you can put a 700 ohm, 20 watt (preferably larger wattage) resister in place of the field coil. Then you can put a 8 ohm, 10 watt or larger resister in place of the speaker leads. You don't need a speaker. My custom M3 band organ has no speaker. Just Leslie.You can power your other amp by a slight modification to the RCA jack on the silver volume box on the amp and get your signal there.
          </p>

          It is VERY important to make sure you don't mix up the field coil wires with the speaker wires. That could spell disaster. Hammond should have never had those wires coming out of the same connector. Very poor design (of course back then only techs worked on them but techs still make absent minded mistakes!).
          </p>

          </p>
          Hammonds: A; AB; B3; D; E; 6-M3's; 2-A100; T582C.
          Leslies: 3-31H; 21H, 22H, 4-44W; 46W; 25; 47; 45; 125; 50C; 51; 55C; 2-120; 122; 122A; 145; 147; 245; 770; 825; 2-102; 2-103; 300.
          Wicks 2/5 pipe organ; Yamaha upright; Kurzweil Micro Piano & Micro B with M-Audio Oxygen 61; Yamaha DGX520; Wurlitzer 4100 (it came with a Leslie!). Peavey KB100 keyboard amp. Peavey Bass Guitar. Yes, I have A. D. (acquisition disorder) and don't want it cured.

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          • #6
            Re: Hammond M3 DI Help

            Got it. The distinction between the 700 ohm, 20 watt and 8 ohm, 10 watt resistors was what I needed to know. Thanks!
            1955 M3 (in good hands!)
            1962 A100
            1942 BC
            too many other keyboards...

            Comment

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