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  • abacus
    replied
    Originally posted by bpsafran View Post
    About Lowrey styles vs. Yamaha. I own and play a Tyros4 and owned several Lowrey Genius models when they first came out in the late 80s. What I liked about the Lowrey styles - at the time at least - were that the patterns changed randomly, even if the chord type (major, minor etc.) did not change. The Tyros4 (and other keyboards) sometimes change patterns when changing from major to minor. But this does not happen in most styles - except for the introductions - and it is not a randomized process. Things therefore can sound more mechanical, even if the Tyros style is indeed well constructed. As a matter of fact, I remember reading the patent for the styles for the MX1. At that time, they did not change patterns randomly, but changed them depending on both the chord type as well as the chord root. I think there were 20 patterns per style segment. However, there were no special orchestrated introductions or endings and only two orchestrated variations.

    I am curious if current Lowrey styles still modify the patterns in a random manner so if you, for example, play a C major chord, you will hear a few patterns that randomly change from one to the other? I think this would be a nice feature to have in keyboards such as Tyros and could be done by combining two or more similar styles and having the keyboard randomly choose the appropriate variation from each style in a random manner. That would make things more mechanical and not even require the writing of new styles - only the randomization algorithm.

    Sam
    From memory the Lowrey styles don’t actually vary, however most are at least 16 bars (Some I believe are 24 bars) long, therefor on most songs there are very few repeats of a pattern during playing. (Hence sounding less mechanical)

    Yamaha keyboards have always been criticised for having a small number of bars in each variation compared to other manufactures, thus creating the mechanical sounding effect. (If you look at most professional Yamaha players, they are constantly using the fill buttons to add variations)

    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • bpsafran
    replied
    About Lowrey styles vs. Yamaha. I own and play a Tyros4 and owned several Lowrey Genius models when they first came out in the late 80s. What I liked about the Lowrey styles - at the time at least - were that the patterns changed randomly, even if the chord type (major, minor etc.) did not change. The Tyros4 (and other keyboards) sometimes change patterns when changing from major to minor. But this does not happen in most styles - except for the introductions - and it is not a randomized process. Things therefore can sound more mechanical, even if the Tyros style is indeed well constructed. As a matter of fact, I remember reading the patent for the styles for the MX1. At that time, they did not change patterns randomly, but changed them depending on both the chord type as well as the chord root. I think there were 20 patterns per style segment. However, there were no special orchestrated introductions or endings and only two orchestrated variations.

    I am curious if current Lowrey styles still modify the patterns in a random manner so if you, for example, play a C major chord, you will hear a few patterns that randomly change from one to the other? I think this would be a nice feature to have in keyboards such as Tyros and could be done by combining two or more similar styles and having the keyboard randomly choose the appropriate variation from each style in a random manner. That would make things more mechanical and not even require the writing of new styles - only the randomization algorithm.

    Sam

    Leave a comment:


  • andyg
    replied
    1) you can't judge an organ by a DVD. What gets recorded is often rather different to what you hear live. It's usually better live!
    2) all organs (except for dedicated theatre/classical models) are menu driven to some extent. Lowrey definitely included. It's OK if you want a sound that's immediately available on the panel, but anything else is a case of hitting a Genius Voice button and choosing a sound.
    3) Cabinets on Lowrey are big, they're designed for American homes that have more room and bigger doors, so they can be a bit overwhelming. Are they retro? I suppose you could call all console organs that. If you want something modern look at Wersi.
    4) ask yourself the all-important question. Do you want to play it or play with it, fiddling with buttons!
    5) if you're coming from keyboard (depending on the make and model) you'll find some of the backing styles and sounds (vital if you don't play pedals!) a tad underwhelming. Some of the styles they like to show off like the Train (Chatanooga) are OK when heard and played a couple of times but then start to get a bit stale. You want more of the more usable styles, and it's here where keyboards like the Yamaha Tyros are streets ahead.

    Bottom line, you're going to have to pay a visit to a few dealers. You mention Allens, so are you in the UK? Then you'll be visiting Great Yarmouth for Lowrey and Peterborough for Roland. Bohm and Wersi - I'll let someone else remind me of where they are!

    You have to try the organ(s) yourself, with only minimal input from the salesman. Above all, it's the overall sound that you have to like, the bells and whistles are a secondary concern. If you don't like the sound, you'll never be happy with it.

    Opinions will differ as to which is the 'best' organ. I'd say Roland, some will say Wersi or Bohm, some will say Lowrey. Only you can decide for yourself, but we'll try to help!

    Leave a comment:


  • joner4567
    replied
    I am still looking to buy my first organ after years of plastic keyboards :o

    I feel like i am floundering around in the unknown .

    Old School --new age -- plastic -- wood --2 speakers or 16 --100 0r 300 watts--??


    Allens sent me a dvd of Lowery Royale second hand !

    After flying ppl for years, to me it looks like the cockpit of Concorde , buttons not menus , looks great!

    The sound is similar as to when i have visited Blackpool Ballroom , loud /powerful.

    Problem is i don`t want to end up buying a old lemmon ,similar to buying a old Mercedes and finding out the gearbox is broke !

    It`s the cabinet that seems a little victorian and retro , i wish they had a more up to date cabinet with the panel that is fitted to the royale .

    I always have a problem of being a avid button pusher from a young age so i could spend years with a Lowery fiddling about !

    The search continues ,i will find one soon !
    jo

    Leave a comment:


  • lparsons21
    replied
    Originally posted by seamaster View Post
    I don't like their new predilection for those aluminium fascias. They look terribly cheap. Like a Radio Shack hifi circa 1980.
    When you see them live in the store it doesn't look as cheap as the photos make them look. But they sure aren't as pretty as the previous models.

    Leave a comment:


  • seamaster
    replied
    And by not having to buy a Christmas tree.

    Leave a comment:


  • andyg
    replied
    Keyboardguy's right, things come in cycles. Lowrey did the aluminium fascia before, of course. The Contempo 80 and Celebration models from the 70s.

    And all the console lights and illuminated buttons mean that you save a fortune in not having to have the room lights turned on........

    Leave a comment:


  • SBurton
    replied
    If you are buying an organ for the looks, you are already doomed!

    And those brightly lit and brightly colored buttons are an absolute necessity so you can hit the right one...and get the banjo arpeggio at the required moment and not a trombone solo. :devil:

    Leave a comment:


  • Keyboardguy
    replied
    What goes around comes around. Look at TV's for instance, in the next year or two they'll all have silver / grey screen surrounds again probably.

    Leave a comment:


  • seamaster
    replied
    I don't like their new predilection for those aluminium fascias. They look terribly cheap. Like a Radio Shack hifi circa 1980.

    Leave a comment:


  • Leo
    replied
    The $2000 sounds more realistic for a copy of a space ship look.
    Originally posted by gfmucci View Post
    It is objectively a great organ. Many consider it overpriced, but it is priced what the market will bear. Some say it looks great. Some others don't like the looks (same applies to $90,000 cars.) Some believe seniors are being swindled. Many seniors disagree and love their purchase.

    My opinion: I love the sound, the features and the look. I wouldn't mind owning one in ten years when it sells for $2,000.

    Leave a comment:


  • gfmucci
    replied
    It is objectively a great organ. Many consider it overpriced, but it is priced what the market will bear. Some say it looks great. Some others don't like the looks (same applies to $90,000 cars.) Some believe seniors are being swindled. Many seniors disagree and love their purchase.

    My opinion: I love the sound, the features and the look. I wouldn't mind owning one in ten years when it sells for $2,000.

    Leave a comment:


  • RODDDIEHL
    replied
    Probably more fact oriented than opinionated

    Originally posted by Leo View Post
    Or are they just to opinionated ?

    Leave a comment:


  • Leo
    replied
    Or are they just to opinionated ?
    Originally posted by RODDDIEHL View Post
    Lowrey owners have the best opinions.

    Leave a comment:


  • RODDDIEHL
    replied
    Originally posted by seamaster View Post
    They should be obliged to edit their posts so the letters C, F and G are always coloured.
    Agreed :)

    Leave a comment:

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