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What is this extra Roland power cord for?

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  • What is this extra Roland power cord for?

    I bought a Roland Atelier AT-900C - used, obviously. As is often the case, the previous owner passed and the kids sold the instrument to me, together with a box of sheet music, instruction manual, handwritten lesson notes, etc.

    Also included was a Roland PSB-1U power cord. I have no idea what this is for as the organ already has a power cord. Was this provided for the Atelier 900C owner that wants to remove the PK-25A pedalboard and use it under a different MIDI keyboard? Or is there something else on my Roland that requires a second power cord?


  • #2
    I'd guess he had a second Roland product at some point and this was its power supply. Either that or, yes, it's to power the pedalboard for other uses - never heard of that, though.
    It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

    New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

    Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha Genos, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
    Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
    Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
    Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

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    • #3
      Thanks, Andy. I just now discovered that Roland still has a page up for the PK-25A pedalboard, even though it was discontinued some time ago. It doesn't give a model name for a power cord, but it states that there are two ways to power it. One is through the organ cable - the other is through a dedicated AC adaptor. That most likely is what this cord is.

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      • #4
        I would think that the power supply and pedals would likely have the required voltage and amperage posted somewhere on them. If they match, that would at least add one more point to them going together.
        Sam
        Home: Allen ADC-4500 Church: Allen MDS-5
        Files: Allen Tone Card (TC) Database, TC Info, TC Converter, TC Mixer, ADC TC SF2, and MOS TC SF2, ADC TC Cad/Rvt, MOS TC Cad/Rvt, Organ Database, Music Library, etc. PM for unlinked files.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by samibe View Post
          I would think that the power supply and pedals would likely have the required voltage and amperage posted somewhere on them. If they match, that would at least add one more point to them going together.
          You're probably right, Sam. For now, I'm going on faith that the power supply goes with the pedals when they are used separately ... and I'll be keeping it in my "miscellaneous organ hardware" box in the closet. But the next time I'm inclined to pull the pedals out for whatever reason, the electrical specification sticker would be the first thing I'd want to take a look at.
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          By the way, I consider the purchase of this AT900C for only $4500 quite a remarkable find. It was just a year or two ago that I was seriously considering the PK-25A pedalboard for $2,000 ... which is actually on eBay occasionally for MORE than it's original retail price, since Roland no longer makes them and MIDI console pedalboards are hard to come by.

          And here I got a 900 Atelier - together with the PK-25A pedals - (which can be used separately under another keyboard) - for $4500. I'm sure someone will do even better in the years to come, but for right now, that's got to be a first.

          All the way around, an extraordinary deal. It's always been common knowledge that organs depreciate quickly and often severely ... but this is now off the charts. Only five years ago, this instrument was selling for 35k-40k. And I'm not aware of anything significant that has developed with home organs or MIDI keyboards since. So to get one this cheaply, in mint condition, is the next best thing to Roland just giving me a brand new one for free.


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          • #6
            Yes, when you were writing about the "spare" power adapter (I also assumed that it was provided with the pedalboard), I was remembering someone buying a 900c for $4500, a fabulous deal. I am seriously considering cutting down a 90s, essentially building a new case, just for the purpose of ending up with what you bought so spectaculerly reasonable. I would probably drive to California (from Georgia) for a deal like that.
            Roland Atelier AT-90s, AT-80s, AT-70, 30, and 15. Roland VR-760 combo
            Yamaha S-90, Kurzweil PC-3x, Casio Privia PX-330, Roland E-80, G-70, BK-5, Leslie 760, 820
            Moved on:
            Allen 3MT/Hauptwerk, Technics GA1, Yamaha HX1, AR80, numerous Hammonds, including 2 M's, an L, 2 A-100's, XP-2, XM-1/1c, & an XK-3. Roland Atelier AT-30, 60r, 80, & 20r(2 units), and a slew of Leslies (147, 142, 760, 900, 330).
            Korg Triton Le-61, Casio Privia PX-310 & 110, and Kurzweils: PC-2x, SP-88, Pro-III, K1000

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Kurzweil View Post
              Yes, when you were writing about the "spare" power adapter (I also assumed that it was provided with the pedalboard), I was remembering someone buying a 900c for $4500, a fabulous deal. I am seriously considering cutting down a 90s, essentially building a new case, just for the purpose of ending up with what you bought so spectaculerly reasonable. I would probably drive to California (from Georgia) for a deal like that.
              Unless you have some inescapable need for a portable Atelier, I would not recommend cutting down your 90S. I was the world's most diligent, watchful, persistent, and prayerful Atelier shopper just before finding my 900C. So I heard a few other instruments along the way, as I was being tempted to "settle" so something slightly less than a 900. I sat at a 90SL, an 800, and a 90S. While the 900C is superior to the 90S in features, my experience was that the 90S had better "tonal" quality ... ie, the combination of the speakers, amp, and [I]organ cabinetry[I] (which doubles as the speaker cabinet) sounded better. In fact, if you were to put a 900C and an AT900 (identical instrument except for speakers and cabinetry) in the same room side by side, the difference of those speakers inside of a heavy wood cabinet is remarkable.

              A chopped 90S really only makes sense if you are running the audio through an external audio system that exceeds the capability of the 90S. Other than that, you're going to be disappointed in how much sound quality you give up by reducing the cabinet.

              Just stay on top of searchtempest every single day for every market in the US and get what you really want.

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              • #8
                Portable Atelier Organ

                Well, I've talked about it for a few years, even have the old anvil cases from which I'll get all of the materials. The goal is portability. I move an organ each time I play one. My current one is an AT-15, cut down as described in earlier posts. But no loss in sound quality because, fortunately, it already stank. External sound system is definitely required. Currently I use keyboards most of the time but a portable TOTL Atelier remains a long term wish. Allowing time to take your second suggestion, and look for the 900c. It would still require work as nice wood is difficult to handle. I'd need steel corners and edges, etc., so the new case would probably still happen with simpler interfaces. The advantage of doing the 90s is that 1.) it has fairly low value, hence lower loss, 2.) its bass board is defective so the low end is not there, even with the present speaker system, and 3.) the dimensions are probably about the same for the 900c, I could put the 90s back in it's furniture case and transfer the 900c "works" into the anvil style case, should I eventually acquire one.
                Roland Atelier AT-90s, AT-80s, AT-70, 30, and 15. Roland VR-760 combo
                Yamaha S-90, Kurzweil PC-3x, Casio Privia PX-330, Roland E-80, G-70, BK-5, Leslie 760, 820
                Moved on:
                Allen 3MT/Hauptwerk, Technics GA1, Yamaha HX1, AR80, numerous Hammonds, including 2 M's, an L, 2 A-100's, XP-2, XM-1/1c, & an XK-3. Roland Atelier AT-30, 60r, 80, & 20r(2 units), and a slew of Leslies (147, 142, 760, 900, 330).
                Korg Triton Le-61, Casio Privia PX-310 & 110, and Kurzweils: PC-2x, SP-88, Pro-III, K1000

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Kurzweil View Post
                  Well, I've talked about it for a few years, even have the old anvil cases from which I'll get all of the materials. The goal is portability. I move an organ each time I play one. My current one is an AT-15, cut down as described in earlier posts. But no loss in sound quality because, fortunately, it already stank. External sound system is definitely required. Currently I use keyboards most of the time but a portable TOTL Atelier remains a long term wish. Allowing time to take your second suggestion, and look for the 900c. It would still require work as nice wood is difficult to handle. I'd need steel corners and edges, etc., so the new case would probably still happen with simpler interfaces. The advantage of doing the 90s is that 1.) it has fairly low value, hence lower loss, 2.) its bass board is defective so the low end is not there, even with the present speaker system, and 3.) the dimensions are probably about the same for the 900c, I could put the 90s back in it's furniture case and transfer the 900c "works" into the anvil style case, should I eventually acquire one.

                  Odds are, any 900c is going to be as pristine as any other recent Atelier that comes on the market. That's just my guess ... as it's hard to fathom anyone actually dissembling this thing and taking it out and about. I haven't had to dissemble mine yet (it arrived in one piece) but I've been told by a dealer that the "portability" of the 900c is not "all that". It's quite tricky to take apart and put back together again. I have a Hammond B3-P (portable). With that thing, two big-handle screws and you're done!

                  So that said ... and given that you're using external sound ... taking apart a 90S definitely is much cheaper on the wallet and the conscience.


                  For what it's worth, (not much), last year I wrote a letter to Roland and asked them to take one more run at the Atelier by putting the features of the 900 Platinum into a portable keyboard. People could add a second manual and pedals however they were inclined. Of course, Roland disregarded my letter and never responded.

                  That would have been just the thing for you, it sounds like.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Neumie View Post
                    Roland disregarded my letter and never responded.
                    Roland has had a history of disregarding letters, both on this and the arranger forum. Thanks for the suggestions. I use an E-80 Roland arranger sometimes and it is readily configurable as you suggest.
                    Roland Atelier AT-90s, AT-80s, AT-70, 30, and 15. Roland VR-760 combo
                    Yamaha S-90, Kurzweil PC-3x, Casio Privia PX-330, Roland E-80, G-70, BK-5, Leslie 760, 820
                    Moved on:
                    Allen 3MT/Hauptwerk, Technics GA1, Yamaha HX1, AR80, numerous Hammonds, including 2 M's, an L, 2 A-100's, XP-2, XM-1/1c, & an XK-3. Roland Atelier AT-30, 60r, 80, & 20r(2 units), and a slew of Leslies (147, 142, 760, 900, 330).
                    Korg Triton Le-61, Casio Privia PX-310 & 110, and Kurzweils: PC-2x, SP-88, Pro-III, K1000

                    Comment

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