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Best home organ to plug into Focusrite 2i2 interface for recording?

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  • Best home organ to plug into Focusrite 2i2 interface for recording?

    I want to replace my crappy Kawai organ with something that's from the same era (1960s-70s) but with the right output to plug into a Focusrite 2i2 interface so I can make my own organ records. Any ideas? I need something that's at least 61 keys in length with a spinet size 25 note pedalboard (as my house is too xxxxx small for a full size board)
    Last edited by andyg; 04-08-2018, 03:43 AM.
    Current Organs/Keyboards:1967 Hammond H-111, 1971 Hammond L-112, 1972 Hammond T-524

    Leslie cabinets: 1975 Leslie 825 & 1974-76 Leslie Model 705
    Past Organs/Keyboards: 1961 Hammond L-101, 1974 Kawai E-300, 1968 Yamaha B-55N, 1979 Yamaha Electone B-55N, 1984 Yamaha Electone ME-50 and a lot more!

  • #2
    I think you've asked this before!

    There is nothing from the 1960s/70s era that fits your requirements of 2x61 note manuals plus 25 spinet pedals.

    You have four Hammonds that will plug in to your Focusrite - two with a line out mod (discussed many times here, often complete with schematics), at least one that will plug in with a padded down signal from its headphones socket and another that might have a suitable output anyway. Of course, you won't have any rotary effects but you'll have the vibrato. Buy two cheap mikes and buy a small mixer (or borrow them and treat them nicely!) and use the Elkatone if you want rotary.

    And I've edited your post for language. :(
    It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

    New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

    Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha Genos, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
    Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
    Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
    Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

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    • #3
      Originally posted by andyg View Post
      I think you've asked this before!

      There is nothing from the 1960s/70s era that fits your requirements of 2x61 note manuals plus 25 spinet pedals.

      You have four Hammonds that will plug in to your Focusrite - two with a line out mod (discussed many times here, often complete with schematics), at least one that will plug in with a padded down signal from its headphones socket and another that might have a suitable output anyway. Of course, you won't have any rotary effects but you'll have the vibrato. Buy two cheap mikes and buy a small mixer (or borrow them and treat them nicely!) and use the Elkatone if you want rotary.

      And I've edited your post for language. :(
      Thanks, Andy. Sadly my Elkatone has finally bit the dust. The fast and slow motors seized up on me today (even though I regularly oiled them every 3 months)
      I already modified my M3 for a line out to plug into said Elkatone, but now since the speaker's out of action, I'm now on the hunt for another Leslie to use with the M3.
      Current Organs/Keyboards:1967 Hammond H-111, 1971 Hammond L-112, 1972 Hammond T-524

      Leslie cabinets: 1975 Leslie 825 & 1974-76 Leslie Model 705
      Past Organs/Keyboards: 1961 Hammond L-101, 1974 Kawai E-300, 1968 Yamaha B-55N, 1979 Yamaha Electone B-55N, 1984 Yamaha Electone ME-50 and a lot more!

      Comment


      • #4
        it takes a lot of knowledge of acoustics and sound to amplify and record any signal, including and especially a rotary speaker. save yourself a lot of time and instead use a leslie plugin. there are many free and open source options that will sound ten times better than any attempt you'll make.

        andy mentioned padding down the headphone signal. i'm sure you know what this means but always record at volumes that won't distort and mess up recordings that might have other elements. in computer recording, a good rule of thumb is -16db peak.
        Why do fools fall in lava?

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