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How to move Baldwin Model 45, remove pedal boards?

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  • How to move Baldwin Model 45, remove pedal boards?

    I am delivering my mother's like new Baldwin Model 45 organ to her friend. it works perfectly. one photo is attached. I would appreciate advice on how best to secure the organ for moving it. The new owner is an organist and said the pedal boards need removed to transport it (1.5 Miles). Anything else I should do? Thank you.Click image for larger version

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  • #2
    The pedals will come right off when you lift them slightly where they connect to the console. They are just lying there, but there are some notches or studs that keep them correctly positioned, so you must lift the front end of the pedalboard up about a half inch or so before you pull it away from the console.

    Be careful of the "fingers" at the ends of the pedal sticks. These are rather flimsy little spring-steel strips that do the actual keying of the pedal notes. Be sure not to bend them up or down, and don't straighten them out. They have been positioned so as to press correctly, even though they look very crooked.

    When you transport the organ, note that the bottom of the console doesn't have much support. In fact, there may be nothing on the bottom except a metal bar of some kind, so don't put any weight on that. Use a pair of dollies so each end can be separately supported when rolling it out to the truck.

    The console will probably be very much front-heavy and will try to tip over forward, so make sure to hold it up when putting it on the dollies and rolling it. Also, when you get it into the truck, strap it in securely so it can't tip over in transit.

    These old things are quite heavy, so have plenty of help on hand. It would be good to have four strong guys. There may be some pull-out "handles" that you can grab on the back of the organ. Or you may have to remove the back to find them. The back just snaps off by pulling it loose at the top, unless it happens to have some screws in it.

    This organ will surely need tuning. Probably needs it right now, but even more after moving. There are 12 tuning coils in the back near the top that adjust the pitch of each named note of the scale. A 13th one tunes just the top C of the 2' stop. They can be tuned using a free cell phone app. Adjust the pitch by turning the shank that sticks out the top with your fingers or with a small screwdriver if you can't turn it with a finger grip.
    John
    ----------
    *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

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    • #3
      Are you aware of just how old the organ is? Somewhere between 1953 and 1959!

      So it may be needing a little or a lot more TLC than a simple tuning, unless it's been recently fully serviced. 'Like new' on the outside doesn't mean that there are no issues inside. You may be lucky, you may not, but age is a definite factor to be considered. And do be careful with the tuning coils. They're often very fragile and can become brittle with age. Turn them very gently, and we usually recommend using a non-magnetic tool. Jbird will have seen more of them than me and will be able to give you better advice on specifics.
      It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

      New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

      Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha Genos, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
      Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
      Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
      Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

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      • #4
        Heed what Andy says ^^. It has been a good many years since I've seen an old 45. A little old lady customer had one in her home that she had me service frequently, but she passed away five years ago and I don't know what became of her organ.

        As Andy says, it could need more than a little TLC. Sometimes these old tube generators need their "bias" re-regulated, and there may not be anybody left who does that. In decades past, I could remove the entire generator assembly from a Baldwin and send it to some guys in Fayetteville Arkansas who had worked at Baldwin back in the day, and who still had the equipment for setting the bias. Not sure they are still doing that. It cost a lot of money back then, hundreds of dollars, plus the costly freight charges. A person had to be pretty attached to their old Baldwin to want to pay the price.

        I may have been thinking of a model 46 instead of a 45 when I described the tuning coils. On a 45 they may be enclosed in the chassis and accessible only by a small screwdriver slot. But it should be obvious. Yet, as Andy warns, tuning may be the least of your troubles!

        OTOH, these things were built like a tank (and weigh almost as much) and you may find it working quite well. Good luck!
        John
        ----------
        *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

        https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

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