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Removing a Lowrey Teenie Genie Power supply?

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  • Removing a Lowrey Teenie Genie Power supply?

    Hi again, I'm back at the teenie genie. The manual shows that there's a fuse and some capacitors in the power supply. It's been unplugged for months, hasn't worked in years. Is it safe to just unscrew the assembly?

  • #2
    I would recon it will be safe, provided it is unplugged from the mains...:->. However, why would you want to unscrew the assembly? If the supply wire is intact and no other obvious cracked or loose wires, why not power up to see if there is life. If it is dead, it will likely stay dead and Seamaster's remedy perhaps called for.

    Nico
    "Don't make war, make music!" Hammonds, Lowreys, Yamaha's, Gulbransens, Baldwin, Technics, Johannus. Reed organs. Details on request... B-)

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    • #3
      Should be safe but rubber gloves never hurt. I've got the same organ and there is a fuse soldered inline on the amplifier board. its a 1A 125 slow blow. I cut mine out and soldered a fuse holder in to replace. I'm using a 1a 250v fuse without any problems right now
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      • #4
        Orangeflipflop: Given the age, and the fact that it's a quick and cheap job, I'd recommend changing all the e-caps on the board. After that time unplugged, it should be quite safe to handle.

        Northoak: Using exact replacements is de rigeur for fuses, so that fuse isn't really correct. 1 amp at 250 V = 250 watts. 1 amps at 125 V = 125 watts, so that 250 V fuse will take more current than the 125 V one - you may not be as well protected as you think.For what it costs and the time taken to replace it, I'd get a 125 V 1 amp slow blow fuse in there.
        It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

        New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

        Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha Genos, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
        Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
        Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
        Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

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        • #5
          ? Fuses don't operate on power, they operate on current. A 250V fuse of the same type and current rating as a 125V or 1000V one will offer the same protection at 125V.

          In fact, I'd highly recommend using a 250V one in place of a 125V one. Line voltage here often exceeds 125V these days. Granted that 125V fuse will still likely be safe at 128V, but theoretically it might not.

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          • #6
            Oops. You're quite right, of course. Note to self: Don't type when you're almost asleep!
            It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

            New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

            Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha Genos, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
            Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
            Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
            Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

            Comment

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