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Favorite Registrations

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  • Favorite Registrations

    Hi all,

    While I know that registrations vary from instrument to instrument, I thought it might be fun to share some favorite registrations that seem to work well on many home organs. I'm thinking more of vintage instruments since with the newer digital orchestral organs registrations are not as "transportable." I'm also thinking mostly of upper manual for right hand melody.
    1. Flutes 16' and 4' (or 16' and 2' for a "lighter" sound)
    2. Flutes 16', 4', String 8'.
    3. Any combination of Flute pitches.
    These are some of my "go to" registrations when playing an unfamiliar organ.

    Anybody else have favorites they are willing to share?

    Later,
    Allen
    Currently own: Roland Atelier AT-90, Yamaha 115D, Roland DP-90SE, Yamaha PSR-S910

    YouTube Channel

  • #2
    16', 8', and 2' Flutes. Alternately, one could use 8', 4', and 1' Flutes.

    Another imitation Clarinet is 8', 2-2/3', and 1-3/5' (or 1-1/3') Flutes. For a little more color I sometimes throw in the 2' Flute. I've resorted to these on my Lowrey in the past.

    Michael
    Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
    • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
    • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
    • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

    Comment


    • #3
      Flutes 16' & 2-2/3' is good for me (or should that be are good for me?)

      Roger
      Previous: Elka Crescendo 303, Technics G7, Yamaha EL-90
      Current: Yamaha AR-100

      Comment


      • myorgan
        myorgan commented
        Editing a comment
        Yes, that's right!;-)

        Michael

    • #4
      My favourites have always been the Jesse Crawford registrations...

      Open Tibias
      Swell: 00 8005 000
      Tibia 8'
      Swell: 00 8030 000
      Breathy Sound
      Swell: 08 8008 000

      I still need to read about flute drawbars though as I don't really understand them fully yet :->

      Comment


      • #5
        Originally posted by nickp82 View Post
        I still need to read about flute drawbars though as I don't really understand them fully yet :->
        Watch this:



        Thank me later. :-)

        Comment


        • voet
          voet commented
          Editing a comment
          Thanks for this link, seamaster. I really enjoyed it even though I am from a classical organ background.

        • nickp82
          nickp82 commented
          Editing a comment
          Thanks for the link, quite fascinating and much more understood now... They seem like organ drawknobs but with built in volume control :)

      • #6
        If you have a 4' flute stop use that with the 1-1/3' Larigot and play an octave lower for a solo stop. I will sometimes use the 8' Oboe along with the 4' flute, plus tremolo.
        On analog organs one can use the 8' Oboe and play it in the tenor range for a Bassoon stop.

        Other favorite combinations of mine are 16' and 2" flute for melody/solo.

        Combinations are infinite - do what sounds good to your ears. When I am registering hymns for church services I will use the Swell Flutes coupled to the Great Principals, and with the Swell being able to be expressed (adjust volume level). I will add a reed or mixture on different verses - I change registrations for every hymn verse, too.

        I tend to go easy on having too much bass in the pedals - the constant drone of the loudest low notes has a tendency to get very boring to the average listener.

        I spend a good amount of time on registrations for my preludes, offertories and postludes, making stop changes, manual changes, setting up combinations on the pistons and such ... I enjoy exploring the total tonal resources of the instrument I play. On every new instrument I play I always start with the softest stops - and build gradually.

        Comment


        • #7
          A couple of stops that I've come to appreciate in recent years -- the 2-2/3 "quint" on the great, which is a principal voice, as opposed to the 2-2/3 Nazard on the swell, which is a flute. Adding the quint to the 8-4-2 principals gives it a certain richness without the trebley effect of the mixtures. The other one I've discovered is the 16' Gemshorn on the great. I used to stay totally away from 16' manual stops in ensembles for fear of sounding muddy. But if the 16' stop is voiced softly enough, it can add some needed "grunt" to the sound for that extra body you may want at times.
          John
          ----------
          *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

          https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

          Comment


          • #8
            Some unit organs create synthetic reeds using mutations. A couple of posters have already mentioned some synthetic clarinet combos. I also like to use a 4', 2 2/3' and 1 3/5' combo played an octave lower for a synthetic oboe. The 4' could be a flute or other flue stop. You can also use the mutations to color reeds for variation. I would just have fun and play.
            Bill

            My home organ: Content M5800 as a midi controller for Hauptwerk

            Comment


            • #9
              Originally posted by jbird604 View Post
              A couple of stops that I've come to appreciate in recent years -- the 2-2/3 "quint" on the great, which is a principal voice, as opposed to the 2-2/3 Nazard on the swell, which is a flute. Adding the quint to the 8-4-2 principals gives it a certain richness without the trebley effect of the mixtures. The other one I've discovered is the 16' Gemshorn on the great. I used to stay totally away from 16' manual stops in ensembles for fear of sounding muddy. But if the 16' stop is voiced softly enough, it can add some needed "grunt" to the sound for that extra body you may want at times.
              What fresh hell is this?

              Comment


              • myorgan
                myorgan commented
                Editing a comment
                True, Andy! Perhaps Lowrey took some liberties in naming their stops. Now you know why I'm so confused on some stop naming conventions, because my Lowrey was my first exposure to stops, as well as my first opportunity to decide which stops I liked and didn't. Now that I have my Allens and have played pipe organs and Rodgers instruments, I finally know what they're REALLY supposed to sound like.;-)

                Michael

              • human-potato_hybrid
                human-potato_hybrid commented
                Editing a comment
                What's a Nasard? The 2 2/3 quint?

              • myorgan
                myorgan commented
                Editing a comment
                According to the Encyclopedia of Organ Stops, the Nazard (also Nasard) is made of Flute stops, whereas the Quint is normally made of Diapason stops, but can also be made of Flute stops: http://www.organstops.org/n/_IndexN.html

                Just click on the letter "Q" at the top of the page to check out the quint's definition-when made of Flute stops, there is generally some designation in the stop name.

                Michael

                P.S. There are (at this post) 9 comments to the original post. Just click on the 3-7 to check the entire conversation.
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