Forum Top Banner Ad

Collapse

Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Help with Wurlitzer 4370

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Help with Wurlitzer 4370



    Have a twelve year old who's playing a lot of piano, keyboards in church band, and taking organ lessons for six months now. At church he plays a whomping big pipe-organ in the main sanctuary. Can't get him back and forth to church to practice as much as he needs, but have basically snagged a Wurlitzer 4370 for next to nothing (ser. no. 1021xxx). I followed directions from forum about checking out the organ when I went to see it and every single thing seems to work.</P>


    So, here's my questions:</P>


    1) Should I blast the interior with a shop-vac on blower mode and suck up the cloud of dust from inside the cabinet, or should I carefully brush and vacuum as much dust clear as possible?</P>


    2) The spectra-tone unit has two issues. First, best place to buy a replacement drive belt? Second, it sounds as if there is a bearing going out (or gone) in the drive motor for the unit. Is there a good way to lubricate the drive shaft, and if so, is it with oil or with graphite, do you think? There's a bit of black dust scattered around in that general vicinity of the organ and it looks to me like it could be either graphite or metal grindings from the drive shaft slowly eroding itself away.</P>


    From a playing standpoint, I've seen a lot of raves on the forum for the 4300 series (which I think would include this organ, right?). I hate to trouble you, but are there a couple of registers (or stop settings; I'm still learning the jargon) you'd recommend for a jazzy sound? I know it's not a Hammond and I see the controversy that rages back and forth about that, but it would be helpful for hooking my son if he could set a decent emulation/imitation of that classic jazz/rock organ voicing.</P>


    Thanks to all of you who keep the flame lit for kids like my son. Your attempts to flatten the learning curve, helps us ukulele dads connect our kids with decent equipment that can keep up with their creativity and cultivate that fragile interest in putting fingers to keys. I'm more grateful than you can imagine.</P>

  • #2
    Re: Help with Wurlitzer 4370



    The 4370 and the 4300 organs are quite a bit different although they are similiar in some ways. I still said the 4300 Series are the better of the two different series. The 4373 came out in 1973, and had numerous changes, additions, etc. in the way of features and controls. You might try Morelock's in Mississippi for a copy of the owner's manual regarding various possible stop settings for various tones. No, these organs are far from doing or sounding like a Hammond, and the touch is not percussive like a Hammond. The touch is much smoother than Hammond. However, I am sure there are settings for all types of music inheret in this model for jazz.</P>


    I do not know how to work on anything mechanical, and you need a qualified tech to check all of this out for you. I just had a tech here this AM who was inside my Wurlitzer 4100A to check matters out. He told me not to touch anything inside in the way of cleaning unless I took a vacuum and let it just blow everything out. Well, my small vacuum cleaner doesn't have the blower feature so I am out of commission on doing that for sure. He told me NOT to brush, use a swifer or even vacuum (suction) anything inside the organ. Hetook a few parts and said just let it be until I get back, and we can go from there.</P>


    It is good to know your son has an interest in the organ. They are not popular these days since there are so many type of keyboards available that have many options in sound. I still prefer playing an organ regardless, and like the way the older electronic organs function.</P>
    <P mce_keep="true"></P>


    James</P>
    Baldwin Church Organ Model 48C
    Baldwin Spinet 58R
    Lowrey Spinet SCL
    Wurlitzer 4100A
    Crown Pump Organ by Geo. P. Bent, Chicago, Illinois


    Organs I hope to obtain in the future:

    Conn Tube Minuet or Caprice even a transistor Caprice with the color coded tabs
    Gulbransen H3 or G3, or V.
    Wurlitzer 44, 4410, 4420, ES Reed Models, 4300, 4500, Transistor Models

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Help with Wurlitzer 4370

      Thanks James. I will blow it out and I appreciate the reference to Morelock's. I will look to them for more detailed information.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Help with Wurlitzer 4370



        Interesting what your tech said about not brushing, TT. My tech went the opposite way and I was taught to carefully brush using a very soft brush (like a camera lens brush) to loosen dust and hold a vacuum cleaner nozzle near to catch the dust as it rose. Mind you that was for transistor organs, not valves. Blowing will just move it around! I've used the brush and suck technique since then (early 70's) with no problems, up to and including my present T402.</P>


        I always ask techs why they are doing something - even if itannoys them - but I have caught one or two out when it turns out I knew more than they did!If they try to blind me with techno-babble, I'll tell them so!</P>


        I think the Orbit III synth has a couple of percussive sounds. You can use these to add a bit of Jazz bite, but it's not the same as a Hammond.</P>


        Andy</P>
        It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

        New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

        Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha Genos, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
        Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
        Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
        Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Help with Wurlitzer 4370



          You are right, Andy.  The Orbit does have some percussive sounds and it won't be the same as a Hammond.  Wurlitzers have their own unique sound imo, as do the Hammonds.  Both very enjoyable.</p>

          One of the things I really like about the Orbit is the Sine Wave sounds, not a flute at all.  I often use the 32' stop as an effect with the upper keyboard as well as the 1/3 stops since the 625T at least doesn't have the disonant footings on the upper keyboard any other way.</p>

           </p>
          Lloyd
          Lowrey SU-630 Palladium, Lowrey GX-1, Hammond Aurora

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Help with Wurlitzer 4370



            Andy,</P>


            Before I read your post it went through my mind that various tech's have their own way of doing something. Anyhow, my small vacuum cleaner doesn't blow so best I could do was get a few dead bugs out of the bottom, and then put the back on like he had done, then move it back against the wall for him to do what he needs to in order to get the organ working properly. I am paying him to get the organ back to my standards and I am thorough. I have learned a lot from him, and I am going to mention the small bush deal and see what his opinion is on that matters. I could do that while he does other things, but he may not permit that. He has always shared is opinions with me regarding technical things as well as literally showed me in his shop how the organ compaines formatted their tone via the_____(can't think of the name of the electronic device) which showedha a certain waveform could be shaped to form another organ voice. I really miss his shop since he downsized it to his home, and is slowly moving out of the repair business. Hopefully, he cankeep my Wurlitzergoing for sometime. He and Iare not young these days.</P>


            Back to my very old Baldwin, theindividual tones are beginning to all sound "clarinety" since Baldwin formatted their tones from a squarewaveform. Who knows he might go on the thoughts if something works don't fix it. I did learn that he is totallyagainst using De-Oxit which I am glad since certain sprays really get to me these days. I have decided since I have hired him to fix the organ, I am going to let him do as he always did in his shop without interferring unless I want to know something or he asks me to assist him.</P>


            He and I have shared info, and since he doesn't play as well as has a bit of hearing loss he always depended on me to help him trouble shoot organs that had problems with the higher pitches since he couldn't hear them. This small Wurlitzer only has 16' 8' 5 1/3' and 4' pitches. It is mellow, but does have a brillance without being metallic and piercing. Also, it has very rich deep sounds via the 16' as well as the 16' coupler. The Diapason is very rich, and has a very church like tone. I grew up when an organ found it place with a prospective owner who were musically inclined had to have good sounding stops regardless of anything else. The only additional features on this model is Sustain in two modes.</P>


            I am just a big Wurlitzer fan regardless, and also am fond of the Gulbransen as well as the very old Conn organs with their few stops, and the coupler system. I grew up on Hammond, and literally have worn myself out with them. So it is nice to have options. I am more of a church organist and lean more towards the organs that have a smooth, yet rich, mellow, some brilliance, etc. to their tones. I enjoy the features of the Wurlitzer organs. I do enjoy playing on most any organ, and it takes a house full to keep my happy. In all, I have had12 I think, but the six I now have is the most at one time.</P>
            <P mce_keep="true"></P>


            James</P>
            Baldwin Church Organ Model 48C
            Baldwin Spinet 58R
            Lowrey Spinet SCL
            Wurlitzer 4100A
            Crown Pump Organ by Geo. P. Bent, Chicago, Illinois


            Organs I hope to obtain in the future:

            Conn Tube Minuet or Caprice even a transistor Caprice with the color coded tabs
            Gulbransen H3 or G3, or V.
            Wurlitzer 44, 4410, 4420, ES Reed Models, 4300, 4500, Transistor Models

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Help with Wurlitzer 4370

              I will use a combination of both, then. There seems to be downsides to both: Brush and vacuum(even with a soft one) and you run risk of dislodging something; Blast it clean with air and you run the risk of forcing dust into contacts and other nooks and crannies that end up degrading the overall performance of the electronics. Perhaps the most sensible approach is to clean as much out as possible with brushing and vacuuming, then blast the rest clear. At least that would reduce the volume of particulate being circulated through the organ.

              Comment

              Working...
              X