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  • This thread is amazing.
    I am really new here with a 'new' D-85, wondering how much of the information here would apply to the D-85, or are they completely different beasts?
    Is this an evolution of similar technology?
    I am loving some of the D-85 sounds already [the 'funny' tab is very synth like already], although I am still trying to work out some basic registrations for synth style pads etc.
    There is a lot of information here and it will take me a few days at least to get my head around all this!

    Comment


    • (Sorry for the compounded reply, the editor seems to combine replies to different postings during the same sitting...)

      All the elements are there, though you couldn't simulate the whole panel at once. I only breadboarded one ring modulator (a hard sync'd oscillator in place of the second) - simulating everything else was just a matter of moving wires around the breadboard and jumpers to various points in the synth to provide the related interconnectivity.

      The element that would be missing are the traditional analog synth keyboard trigger, control voltages and envelopes, after touch etc. The E-series have enough analog elements to hook in much of this stuff in one section or another. The pedal synth has the easiest interface as it's monophonic, otherwise you have to apply global injection of noise etc. on all filters or at the far end...

      Originally posted by mseven View Post
      Cool, so the protoboards in your photo (and the protoboard not photographed) actually do what the panel shows..? Very cool. As you say, the move from working proto circuit to something more rugged is big.

      I've started to wonder whether the cool SoGX mods and other additions can be applied to the average $25 Electone, turning it into a $2000 supersweet analog synth.
      - - - Updated - - -

      Check the rest of the thread/forum for D-85 related material, there are links to service guides/manuals, photo's etc. The most anyone has done with the D-85 as of yet is augment the existing control inputs with additional feeds. A review of the past few weeks back should bring up some related bits on this thread....

      Originally posted by nrand View Post
      This thread is amazing.
      I am really new here with a 'new' D-85, wondering how much of the information here would apply to the D-85, or are they completely different beasts?
      Is this an evolution of similar technology?
      I am loving some of the D-85 sounds already [the 'funny' tab is very synth like already], although I am still trying to work out some basic registrations for synth style pads etc.
      There is a lot of information here and it will take me a few days at least to get my head around all this!

      Comment


      • Originally posted by keyman2 View Post
        All the elements are there, though you couldn't simulate the whole panel at once. I only breadboarded one ring modulator (a hard sync'd oscillator in place of the second) - simulating everything else was just a matter of moving wires around the breadboard and jumpers to various points in the synth to provide the related interconnectivity.

        The element that would be missing are the traditional analog synth keyboard trigger, control voltages and envelopes, after touch etc. The E-series have enough analog elements to hook in much of this stuff in one section or another. The pedal synth has the easiest interface as it's monophonic, otherwise you have to apply global injection of noise etc. on all filters or at the far end...
        That is quite something. Do you think we could make a pc board with your circuitry? That might get pretty valuable.

        <a href="http://img836.imageshack.us/img836/2072/faceplate.jpg" target="http://img836.imageshack.us/img836/2072/faceplate.jpg"><img align=right src="http://img836.imageshack.us/img836/2072/faceplate.jpg" style="width:600px;border:1px solid black;margin-left:20px;z-index:100;position:relative;"></A>I've been working with the CNC guy for a bit and have updated the drawing to where it appears we have finally overcome the technical hurdles to get the panel made.

        Originally posted by keyman2 View Post
        Originally posted by nrand View Post
        This thread is amazing.
        I am really new here with a 'new' D-85, wondering how much of the information here would apply to the D-85, or are they completely different beasts?
        Is this an evolution of similar technology?
        I am loving some of the D-85 sounds already [the 'funny' tab is very synth like already], although I am still trying to work out some basic registrations for synth style pads etc.
        There is a lot of information here and it will take me a few days at least to get my head around all this!
        Check the rest of the thread/forum for D-85 related material, there are links to service guides/manuals, photo's etc. The most anyone has done with the D-85 as of yet is augment the existing control inputs with additional feeds. A review of the past few weeks back should bring up some related bits on this thread....

        Regarding the D-85, I want to add that there's a very simple way to get a quieter signal output while adding effects. The method is shown in a video I made and you can find it on Youtube by searching "Electone key" or clicking this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g8y4rXcyoAA

        The D85s are significantly different instruments compared to the E series. Fortunately they are pretty amazing as they are...
        Mark Sutin

        Comment


        • nrand,

          As a new D-85 owner, you might find this interesting...

          "We found Ray's registrations to be most effective in the sales " arena " when paired-up with the appropriate song for that registration. Of course if you play a different Yamaha model or even a different brand it's still possible to apply many of these ideas and enjoy the experimentation."....

          http://www.organforum.com/forums/sho...ries-Electones
          Mark Sutin

          Comment


          • The squeaky key gets quite a few hits, you should get a landslide once you have your nifty new machined panel assembled and ready for demo...

            As for my own project, I've come to realize it more a process of experimentation and discovery, so can't put any particular timeline to it. Think of it more like Edison 'discovering the lightbulb', it's already been done, just looking to refine it a bit further...

            Otherwise, I'd be happy to pass along what I can when the time comes - that was what Marc and I had reasoned beforehand. I've heard they have a bit of flooding out in Europe, hopefully he's managing to stay dry...

            Comment


            • Originally posted by mseven View Post
              Nice! Lots to think about there....

              =========

              For now I just want to tell M3me someone has made somewhat of a GX-1 VST.

              Haven't had a close look yet but its here: http://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=54945
              Kinda way ahead of ya .... I got this picture from that thread ....


              Originally posted by M3me View Post
              I've been using ExpressPCB for at least five years now. They have a proprietary pcb creator program (free download) that's pretty easy to use once you get the hang of it. I would guess that I've bought 300+ pcbs from them at this point. 3 day delivery is their normal deal. Order Monday, receive boards Thursday. A 1.125" x 5" pcb runs about $135 for twelve peices. A 1"x2" board runs about $140 for 30 pcs. Just sayin.

              If you come up with some whiz-bang design that may be a marketable thing that other Yamaha organ DIYers might be interested in, perhaps ExpressPCB could be of some assistance for you.

              Then again, perhaps not. Just thought I'd throw that out there. All of the champions of this thread may have split, but I still lurk like a ghost even though I'll most likely never own a Yamaha organ. :)

              I'm patiently waiting for the day when someone develops the GX-1 in a VST (most likely not happening, but it doesn't hurt to dream). Or better yet, a GX-1 sound module in a Virtual Analogue "1U rack module" with 128 voice polyphony, sorta like what EMU used to offer.

              Ok, shutting up .... back to your conversation fellas.



              YUMMY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :)
              But hey .... SOOPER THANKS for thinking enough of me to want to let me know about it though! I really appreciate being in your thoughts.

              I've participated in that thread and rec'd a download of the Kontakt instrument that "Robotmaker" made up. Now it's a matter of getting a copy of Kontakt to run it. It will run on the demo version (which is free) however you cannot modify the program at all, or save changes, and the program shuts down after every 30 minutes of use. It will play the instrument and allow you to use it, but you cannot save any changes (except if you save changes within your DAW, then it will save any changes or program sounds you've made up, but only within your DAW). And the instrument that Robotmaker made up is monophonic as well. If you have not listened to the MP3 that he posted of Peter Gunn that he did with it, take a listen. It's pretty good, at least I think it is. It's brighter and a bit more hi-fi, but if you must you can always run it through any number of filter types to re-EQ it to suit your tastes.

              Even though a great job was done with that effort, I'd still love to see a full-on vst of the GX-1.

              There is also at least one hardware filter made modeled after the GX-1's filters.

              http://www.synthtech.com/motm485.html

              Sweet, right? Maybe someday I'll add one to my modular rig. I just started an expansion project to create more module spaces in my modular cab that adds 16 more module spaces, so I may add one of those MOTM 485s at some point. I have five VCOs, each one has it's own 4 stage envelope generator as well. So while my setup would only be monophonic, it might still cover some of the GX-1's sounds. Maybe a couple.

              Thanks again for thinking of me. I appreciate the gesture and the link.
              1962 A102 - Marshall powered 1965 Leslie 251 - 1955 M3 that is for sale
              Emerson-Smith-Dennerlein-Jobson-Walsh-(Jon) Lord enthusiast and typical rock-hack player.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by mseven View Post
                That is quite something. Do you think we could make a pc board with your circuitry? That might get pretty valuable.

                I've been working with the CNC guy for a bit and have updated the drawing to where it appears we have finally overcome the technical hurdles to get the panel made.




                Regarding the D-85, I want to add that there's a very simple way to get a quieter signal output while adding effects. The method is shown in a video I made and you can find it on Youtube by searching "Electone key" or clicking this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g8y4rXcyoAA

                The D85s are significantly different instruments compared to the E series. Fortunately they are pretty amazing as they are...


                I'm going to ask a very stupid question here ..... have you been exposed to Front Panel Designer? It's a company that builds front panels. You draw up your design on a panel design program that they provide for free, and then they build the panel. No minimum quantities either. For the benefit of those unaware of FPD let me say that it's easy to use, nearly unlimited in scope, and they offer super great service. Many colors (most of which are hard anodized!). And complex setups are no problem. Engraving or graphics, words, and names is no problem. They can do radiused corners, many types of slots and drillings, and you can develope panels and get a quote on them instantly within the designer program. You don't have to email them and deal with salespeople to get panel prices. The pricing structure is built in to the designer program. I know of MANY synth module builders that use FPD, as well as hobbyists that only need one panel made up.

                I have drwn up any number of panels. The largest was a 4U rack panel for something I've designed that had slots for sliders, 24 holes in 3 different sizes, blue anodized finish, and 1/8th" thickness. The quote was $75 .. for ONE! That is a GREAT price to be honest.

                http://www.frontpanelexpress.com/

                There's the link to Front Panel Express. Follow the directions to download and install Front Panel Designer, then begin working on it. If you elect to do so, let me know here and I can send you a few FPD files of synth panels to get you started with using the program so you may begin to learn how to use the program faster. I can offer a few user tips as well if you need a push start.

                Just thought I'd throw this at you in case you weren't aware of them. They may be A LOT less expensive than dealing with a CNC shop.

                There's a guy in Muffwigglers forum that is offering an ARP 2600 clone. It is a WONDERFUL thing of beauty. The front control panel for it is a FPD file. So I know for sure that FPE can do panels at least as large and involved as an ARP 2600. Just so you know.
                1962 A102 - Marshall powered 1965 Leslie 251 - 1955 M3 that is for sale
                Emerson-Smith-Dennerlein-Jobson-Walsh-(Jon) Lord enthusiast and typical rock-hack player.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by keyman2 View Post
                  ....The Arp 2600 is nice, this is one they should have updated and reissued just as they've done with the Korg MS-20.
                  Ya mean like this? ...

                  http://thehumancomparator.net/arp2600/2600.jpg/

                  Muffwigglers thread that describes it in great detail ...

                  http://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/vie...2997&highlight=

                  Introducing the Two Thousand Six Hundred .. (aka "TTSH"). A dead on copy of the ARP 2600. Only newer components are being used. Every aspect that makes the 2600 uniquee has been adopted in the TTSH's design and construction. It is, by all acounts, a resurrection of the ARP 2600.

                  Take a listen .....





                  There is a front panel already designed. The maker has also already started a Mouser "project parts list" for the components, all you do is click on the list and all of hte parts for the entire project are already all gathered up in Mouser, you just buy the whole parts package. There are nearly a dozen cabinet makers that are getting in on the project to provide cabs for anyone building this kit. What you get from "Zthee" (the guy making the kit) is two blank PCBs (main board and VCO board) and a completely finished front panel with all of the graphics done up and every hole and slot precut. You must populate the PCBs with the parts that come in the Mouser kit, you must provide a cabinet, and you must wire the assembly.

                  It already has drawn the attention of hundreds (Thousands?) of people on the "interest list" so when the kits are available this coming fall season they'll be first attended to. There are already numerous builders offering services for the electronic construction phase, as well as cabinet builders, and even "Turnkey" builders offering to construct fully operational and completely finished units.

                  See the Muffwigglers thread for every detail and every single question you may have. Most likely it has been answered! There have been over FIFTY THOUSAND views on that thread. This unit is certain to be a huge hit.


                  :)
                  1962 A102 - Marshall powered 1965 Leslie 251 - 1955 M3 that is for sale
                  Emerson-Smith-Dennerlein-Jobson-Walsh-(Jon) Lord enthusiast and typical rock-hack player.

                  Comment


                  • As promised, here's a link to a brand new thread here at The Organ Forum that I just posted regarding the TTSH.

                    http://www.organforum.com/forums/sho...327#post316327

                    So let's take any further discussion about it there, shall we?

                    :)
                    1962 A102 - Marshall powered 1965 Leslie 251 - 1955 M3 that is for sale
                    Emerson-Smith-Dennerlein-Jobson-Walsh-(Jon) Lord enthusiast and typical rock-hack player.

                    Comment


                    • I've moved previous discussion of the TTSH ARP clone to the new thread for continuity.
                      -Admin

                      Allen 965
                      Zuma Group Midi Keyboard Encoder
                      Zuma Group DM Midi Stop Controller
                      Hauptwerk 4.2

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Admin View Post
                        I've moved previous discussion of the TTSH ARP clone to the new thread for continuity.
                        Thank you. :)
                        1962 A102 - Marshall powered 1965 Leslie 251 - 1955 M3 that is for sale
                        Emerson-Smith-Dennerlein-Jobson-Walsh-(Jon) Lord enthusiast and typical rock-hack player.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by keyman2 View Post
                          Thanks, it's based mostly on Marc's recommendations, but it got a bit unwieldy once I added my own ideas - hard to limit yourself when you see the possiblities. Right now it's still a 'concept' as I have a second CSY-2 Synth to add into the implementation. I'll have to look at the approach taken on synths such as the Arp Odyssey and other duophonic designs.

                          Again, it's not directly related to the E-series, but you could implement some of the related ideas, which is why I brought it up....Otherwise, maybe a separate thread would be better once things progress a bit....
                          Here's a thread for the CSY-2

                          http://www.organforum.com/forums/sho...ion-and-Repair
                          Mark Sutin

                          Comment


                          • <a href="http://imageshack.us/a/img823/2369/f23f.jpg" target="http://imageshack.us/a/img442/9243/ty74.jpg"><img align=right style="margin-left:30px;border:1px solid black;" src="http://imageshack.us/a/img442/9243/ty74.jpg"></A>The pushbutton switches arrived today.

                            Very happy with them, great action thank goodness. It only took about 9 months to decide on them and order :! I like them cause they look a little GX-1'ish.

                            My friend Roger the CNC panel gent is work, at a snail's pace he says...

                            Hope to have the first draft by Monday he says
                            Mark Sutin

                            Comment


                            • Hey mseven, is there any published "mean time between failure" or "expected life cycles" type data available on those switches? If so I'd be interested in seeing it. Those look pretty nice, do they light up and can you chose when they light (like when the switch is either closed or open)? Also what switching logic do they provide (SPST, etc ..)?

                              Thanks. :)
                              1962 A102 - Marshall powered 1965 Leslie 251 - 1955 M3 that is for sale
                              Emerson-Smith-Dennerlein-Jobson-Walsh-(Jon) Lord enthusiast and typical rock-hack player.

                              Comment


                              • M3me, I haven't seen any kind of performance data about the switches and I'm betting that no reliable data actually exists if you know what I mean...

                                There are different models I recall; the ones I bought are SPST NO and led circuit is completely unattached from the switch. So far so good for my needs, but as you suggest what happens when they break in a few years..? Actually I think they're gonna be fine. They're smartly engineered.

                                Originally posted by M3me View Post
                                Hey mseven, is there any published "mean time between failure" or "expected life cycles" type data available on those switches? If so I'd be interested in seeing it. Those look pretty nice, do they light up and can you chose when they light (like when the switch is either closed or open)? Also what switching logic do they provide (SPST, etc ..)?

                                Thanks. :)
                                Well... I just found something, but really, who knows:

                                Specifications
                                Light switch R16-503AD, self-lock, illuminated, 16mm 1A 250VAC red, green, yellow, blue colors
                                Light switch R16-503AD features:
                                1> Rating: 1A 250V, 3A 125VAC
                                2> Dielectric Intensity: 1500VAC/1min
                                3> Life: >10000 Cycles
                                4> Enviromental Temperature: -25--+85
                                5> Contact Resistance: <50mΩ
                                6> Insulation Resistance: >100mΩ
                                Last edited by mseven; 06-21-2013, 05:02 PM.
                                Mark Sutin

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