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Lowrey DSO/DSO-1 """Percussion""" stops

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  • Lowrey DSO/DSO-1 """Percussion""" stops

    Any DSO-1 or similar owners out there, does anyone know why it says "percussion" by the reddish stops for the upper manual? They're not percussion stops, are they?
    Pianist for 12+ years. Organist for 2+. Owner of a Lowrey Heritage Deluxe DSO-1, Yamaha Arius YDP-V240, and several wind instruments.

  • #2
    Hello.
    I own one and I know Michael, our Moderator does as well. Cannot answer your question right off as mine is in mothballs currently. If Michael or another proud owner of one of these fine instruments does not weigh in before, I will delve into my horde and check mine.
    Meanwhile enjoy this little beauty.
    Nico
    "Don't make war, make music!" Hammonds, Lowreys, Yamaha's, Gulbransens, Baldwin, Technics, Johannus. Reed organs. Details on request...

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by human-potato_hybrid View Post
      Any DSO-1 or similar owners out there, does anyone know why it says "percussion" by the reddish stops for the upper manual? They're not percussion stops, are they?
      Human Potato,

      Check these pictures in the gallery: https://organforum.com/gallery/displ..._display_media & https://organforum.com/gallery/displ..._display_media. These photos show the area you're talking about.

      If you notice, the two gold lines (above & below the word Percussion) are different lengths. In general, the rocker tabs next to the upper gold line are the stops affected by the percussion, or causing the percussion (i.e. Sustain & Attack parameters). The white rockers on the left are instruments that have sustain/percussion involved (i.e. guitar, vibraphone, and guitar), while the red tabs cover what are considered percussion parameters like attack and sustain (think Hammond organs).

      The lower line shows that all stops that are 8', 4', and 2' are affected by the percussion settings. The 16' stops wouldn't be covered by the percussion.

      I hope that helps.

      Michael
      Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
      • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
      • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
      • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

      Comment


      • #4
        They're not percussion stops in the same as Hammond has percussion stops. That is to say, they do not generate an abrupt attack to the note being played the way Hammonds do with their 2nd and 3rd harmonic. Indeed, 'percussion' is a bit of a misnomer on these old Lowreys. The stops are rather just mixtures of harmonics. One might even call them presets. For example the 8' Vibraharp is identical to the 8' Flute below it in Solo mode. The idea is that you had "SUST. M" (as is inscribed on it) i.e. medium sustain, to create the sound of a vibraharp (or vibraphone). It's a useful tab as the 8' is a good base sound for adding to. The MUSIC BOX tab, also under 'percussion', is in fact a mixture of 4' Flute and 4' String. I suppose it sounds a bit like the sound you get from a child's music box when used with Long Sustain

        It's important to remember that all this stuff, by today's standards, is incredibly primitive and very much of the time. The charm of the DSO is in its tone generation, which is very warm and easy on the ear. Studio producers like them because some of the sounds have an almost polyphonic synth texture - like String played with full sustain. And the DSO belonged to a group of organs that began with the model SS Lincolnwood - so the models of the time from around 1958 to 1965 were roughly the same with additions like AOC (AUTO ORCH tab) coming along as new features, or the REPEAT tab for example.

        These organs are best when played as full-on jazz instruments. Both hands on the two manuals and feet working the pedals. Alan Haven was a superb UK exponent, who ended up in the US for a while. He also played with James Bond soundtrack supremo John Barry using the DSO.

        regards
        Lazlo

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Lazlo View Post
          They're not percussion stops in the same as Hammond has percussion stops. That is to say, they do not generate an abrupt attack to the note being played the way Hammonds do with their 2nd and 3rd harmonic. Indeed, 'percussion' is a bit of a misnomer on these old Lowreys. The stops are rather just mixtures of harmonics.
          Lazio,

          You are correct, of course. I was referring to the 51/3' Quint and the Tone Color 51/3'–22/3' stops which equate to some of the off-pitch drawbars on the Hammond. That's what I was referring to. I wasn't looking at the picture to realize they were not included in the "Percussion" section. Sorry for the misleading comment.

          Michael

          P.S. For some reason, I thought you were in Dayton–moved across the Pond?
          Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
          • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
          • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
          • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by myorgan View Post
            The lower line shows that all stops that are 8', 4', and 2' are affected by the percussion settings. The 16' stops wouldn't be covered by the percussion.
            Yeah, I didn't realize that the Sustain, Attack, etc. were called percussion stops. All of those stops + the Repeat and Auto Orch stops (the "red stops") are already all red (white text on red or vice-versa) to indicate the exclusive functionality, so I wondered why that was labeled as such. Seems a bit redundant to me, but I suppose it's a clarification/description. Now the question is why it says "Stereo" to the right of the bottom manual! Surely the organ is not stereophonic?
            Pianist for 12+ years. Organist for 2+. Owner of a Lowrey Heritage Deluxe DSO-1, Yamaha Arius YDP-V240, and several wind instruments.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by human-potato_hybrid View Post
              Now the question is why it says "Stereo" to the right of the bottom manual! Surely the organ is not stereophonic?
              Since stereo was "invented" in the 1800s, it didn't become readily available for consumer use until the 1950s. When the Lowrey DSO-1 was built in the 1960s, "Stereo" was all the rage. In fact, if you listen to some of the groups of that time (Beatles, Beach Bums, etc.), they often recorded one side of the track for the backing instrumentals, and the other side of the track with voices. Experiment with that sometime.😎

              Back to the DSO-1. Lowrey took certain liberties by using the term "Stereo" because the organ could produce sound from two different locations in the organ. The Leslie speaker is located on the left-hand side (https://organforum.com/gallery/displ..._display_media), and is a two-speed leslie (fast, and slow–aka Chorus Reverb). Note the vertical openings in the cabinet for the Leslie speaker. The manuals could be sent separately to the Leslie speaker on the side of the organ, or directed to the Main speakers in the front of the organ. Then, with the Leslie speaker on, one could choose Add Main to Leslie to use the front speakers as well as the Leslie speakers at the same time, essentially creating stereo. Then there was the option of using an external Leslie speaker, which would further separate the two sound sources for the purpose of creating Stereo.

              One more thing: If a person happened to turn BOTH the Leslie Trem. and Chorus Reverb switches on at the same time, IIRC the Leslie Trem would take over the circuit. Even with the Leslie off, one could still send one manual to the Leslie speaker without it turning at all. Reference this photo: https://organforum.com/gallery/displ..._display_media

              Michael
              Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
              • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
              • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
              • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by myorgan View Post
                One more thing: If a person happened to turn BOTH the Leslie Trem. and Chorus Reverb switches on at the same time, IIRC the Leslie Trem would take over the circuit. Even with the Leslie off, one could still send one manual to the Leslie speaker without it turning at all.
                Just tested it, having MCR (Main Chorus Reverb) + Leslie Trem. on at the same time is no different than just selecting Leslie Trem. Having MCR on by itself automatically sends everything through the Leslie. And you're correct, the Main/Leslie selectors work whether Leslie Trem. is on or off (with the exception of MCR overrriding them as just mentioned).
                Pianist for 12+ years. Organist for 2+. Owner of a Lowrey Heritage Deluxe DSO-1, Yamaha Arius YDP-V240, and several wind instruments.

                Comment


                • #9
                  The fact that you can route each manual to different speakers is stereo, albeit at a basic level. If you have an external Leslie cabinet, the upper manual can be routed to the Leslie, for example, and the lower manual to the internal Main speaker, and vice versa. Hammond spinets of the time, by comparison, don't allow this - at least not without serious post-factory modifications. Is the 'Stereo' effect useful? Well, it can be in the studio if you want to run effects to the Leslie channel like delay or phaser and have the Main channel unaffected. "Separation' might have been a better word than stereo.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    'Stereo' was just the buzz word back in the early 1960s! Almost every manufacturer used it to describe two channel organs - Main and Leslie - either in the brochure, advertising or on the organ itself.

                    It wasn't until around ten years later that we just started to see true stereo, left and right channels (with or without a leslie) in organs.
                    It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

                    New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

                    Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
                    Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
                    Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
                    Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

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                    • #11
                      Human Potato,

                      Just in case you ever ask the question about external Leslie speakers, the compatibility list is found in this thread: https://organforum.com/forums/forum/...7-alternatives

                      As long as you use a 6W-compatible speaker, the onboard Leslie controls will have the same effect on the external 2-speed Leslie. The thread also discusses what happens if you connect a compatible 1-speed Leslie.

                      Enjoy the reading!

                      Michael
                      Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
                      • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
                      • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
                      • 11 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 7 Pianos

                      Comment

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