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Early Electronic Organ Attachments

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  • Early Electronic Organ Attachments

    Lowrey Organo
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    Pedal-Vox
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    The Haygren Electronic Harp-Organ
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    Hammond Solovox

    First introduced in 1940, the Hammond Solovox was an electronic organ-like instrument intended to provide a monophonic solo voice to a piano's percussive accompaniment. A diminutive 3-octave keyboard also housed all registration and tone control tablet-type switches as well as a knee-operated volume control lever. This keyboard/control box was to be mounted underneath the keyboard of a standard piano or organ and was connected via three thick cables to a separate tone cabinet containing the vacuum tube oscillator and divider circuitry, amplifier, and loudspeaker. The tone cabinet could be placed on the floor next to either end of an upright or spinet piano or mounted to an end using brackets. On grand pianos, it was suggested that the tone cabinet be suspended from the underside of the piano using supplied chains. Earlier models J and K employed two vibrating reeds to modulate a vibrato signal onto the signal from the main oscillator. The later model K used a second vacuum tube oscillator to achieve this effect.

    The Solovox was discontinued in 1948, though many of its features such as the Registration and Tone Controls along with their tilting table-style switches and the 3-octave keyboard seemed to find new life in the S-series Chord Organs that Hammond introduced about 1950.

    Models:
    J
    K
    L
    Attached Files
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