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Seeking practical advice on repairing hole in paper cone of 15" speaker from model 45

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  • Seeking practical advice on repairing hole in paper cone of 15" speaker from model 45

    Hello...

    My model 45 Leslie has a 3/4" irregular rip/tear in the paper cone an inch or so in from the outer edge. Does anyone have experience or advice related to repairing a paper cone? Thanks in advance for your help!!!

  • #2
    A tear that big might not be repairable without affecting performance.
    Tissue paper and modeling glue maybe? Case by case basis and would have to see it.
    Anything that old could use a recone in my opinion. Finding 16 ohm coils/formers is still possible for those baskets!(Arizona somewhere?)
    I had my speaker tech recone a P15LL last year for 175CA. Sounded great just before I blew up the '1964'.(last year of P15LL)
    Could have bought a less expensive direct replacement like a Utah or square back Jensen.
    I kept the original,and it sounds great so it's money well spent!
    The fresh P15LL sounds better than my original unreconed Utahs and black Jensens.
    A100/251 A100/147 A102/222 B2/142 BV/147 BCV/145 M3/145 M102/145 M111/770 L101/760 T222/HL722 M111/770 no B3/C3!

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    • #3
      For stiff suspension cones you can sometimes repair rips with Duco cement. Keep the amount of cement as small as possible since you don't want to alter the mass of the cone in any substantial way, or cause it to be significantly out of balance.

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      • #4
        If it were mine, I'd first try plain typewriter or inkjet paper or black construction paper cut to 1/4" or so larger than the torn place and well-coated with E6000 Industrial Adhesive or Shoe Goo. These stay somewhat flexible after drying. Coat the same matching area on the cone, gently supporting from the back while you press it into place. Let it dry thoroughly before playing. Or if you're handy and have a knack for craftsmanship, go to Youtube and search "speaker recone kits." You'll find a whole bunch of videos on the topic, many of them showing step-by-step instructions on how to re-cone speakers. My son (with no experience) re-coned an expensive stereo subwoofer a year or so ago, and it worked perfectly. It has become a DIY project for many of the more adventurous repair-minded folks. Whether or not one of the videos will lead you to a kit for that specific speaker will just take some searching. Check it out. I'd still try the patch first, though.
        Good Luck !
        Roger Memphis
        C-3 with O-M, 145, 122RV, 2 PR-40's, PSR-36
        CV with HR-40, 2 B-40's

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        • #5
          Hello,

          The white wood glue works very well.
          Cheap and easy to adjust.
          Clean with water. Invisible when dry.
          If necessary reinforce with paper or small sheet of thin wall tissue to paint.
          If the suspension is not damaged there will be no problems.

          JP
          Last edited by Jyvoipabo; 04-23-2018, 12:43 AM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Jyvoipabo View Post
            Hello,

            The white wood glue works very well.
            Cheap and easy to adjust.
            Clean with water. Invisible when dry.
            If necessary reinforce with paper or small sheet of thin wall tissue to paint.
            If the suspension is not damaged there will be no problems.

            JP
            I have not had good luck with white wood glue, because it dries brittle
            and cracks where there's any appreciable flexing.
            Roger Memphis
            C-3 with O-M, 145, 122RV, 2 PR-40's, PSR-36
            CV with HR-40, 2 B-40's

            Comment


            • #7
              In the speaker reconing/repair trade, we have a special glue for this kind of thing that dries flexible, but I purchase it from a speaker supply place that doesn't sell direct to the general public.
              I'm David. 'Dave' is someone else's name.

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              • #8
                Hello,

                I replaced several foam speaker suspension.
                They were delivered to me with a small bottle of glue.
                There was nothing marked on it.
                But,
                The liquid had the color of the wood glue.
                He smelled like the wood glue.
                In use it was like wood glue.
                I taste it. It was not canada dry. It was wood glue !

                Like the one I always used on cones.

                This is my practical advise and you can also use glue you like.

                JP

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                • #9
                  I have used the following:

                  * Wood glue, but watered down to a more milk-like viscosity
                  * Pieces of coffee filter, TORN OUT PIECES (not cut with scissors or knives) because that makes the edge a soft one with fibers sticking out rather than a sharp edge.

                  Wet the area around the tear with the watered down glue. Saturate the coffee filter pieces. Now you can patch it up, making sure the torn fiber edges are all properly saturated and that they adhere to the wet speaker cone. Let dry overnight.
                  Current organs: AV, M-3, A-100
                  Current Leslies: 22H, 122, 770

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