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Help connecting M3 to cabinet

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  • Help connecting M3 to cabinet

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ID:	650943 I'm new as a poster on this forum though I've read plenty of posts, so I'm sure you people here could help me out. I know very little about the innards of organs and how to manipulate them and what does what, though I am very curious. My knowledge of electronics is also limited but I want to learn. I purchased a custom built reverb cabinet off craigslist for $250. It's made from an A100. I got it hooked up to my M3 by soldering wires from an XLR cable (what the guy I bought it from used to hook it up) to the speaker terminals in my M3 and putting a resistor between each wire and the ground. It sounds great but there is only the reverb coming through the cabinet; it does not at all make the organ louder, which is why I bought it. I'm posting to see if I can amplify the sound with what I have or I need to buy something, or if I should just tough it out and save for a Leslie? The attached photos are of the speaker. I don't know what the components are, so any comment would be helpful. I was thinking there may be a way to hook it up to the amp of my M3. All thoughts are appreciated.

  • #2
    Hello. Welcome to the forum.

    You have the lower "half" of an A-100. But, hopefully you already knew this. The A-100 has two amplifiers: an AO-39 (which on yours, it is the chassis currently mounted on top) and an AO-44 (which is mounted inside in.. what must be the A-100 sideways swell pedal housing.) The AO-39 accepts a balanced signal from the organ's preamp, and amplifies dry (non-reverb) signal, whatever is fed to it, to the two main speakers.
    -- Speaker level signal from the AO-39 is then fed as input to the AO-44 amplifier. The volume of the AO-44 speaker output is controlled by the reverb rheostat knob (which someone has mounted to the back corner). Only one speaker will output reverb.

    Originally posted by wdasselin View Post
    I got it hooked up to my M3 by soldering wires from an XLR cable (what the guy I bought it from used to hook it up) to the speaker terminals in my M3 and putting a resistor between each wire and the ground.
    The AO-39 is a power amplifier and it drives the two speakers which, to your eyes, are on "bottom". If you are feeding it speaker-level signal from your M-3, that is way too hot of a signal. Also, it requires a balanced signal. SOME M-3 amplifiers are balanced, some are single-ended. It depends on the year.
    -- Also, you did not mention whether the M-3 speaker is still connected. We can't know for-sure how the XLR cable is wired up here.


    Originally posted by wdasselin View Post
    It sounds great but there is only the reverb coming through the cabinet; it does not at all make the organ louder, which is why I bought it.
    It is normal that reverb from an A-100 only comes out of the one reverb speaker (which to your eyes, is the spealer closer to the top.) Is that working?

    Originally posted by wdasselin View Post
    I'm posting to see if I can amplify the sound with what I have or I need to buy something, or if I should just tough it out and save for a Leslie?
    Do you want more dry volume, reverb, or a Leslie effect? To make it sound like a Leslie, buy a Leslie.

    There is a lot going on here. Whoever put this cabinet together should have been more thoughtful as to what your needs were, and properly wired up the amplifiers, as well as given some though as to the instrument driving it. AO-29 (amplifier in your M-3) has multiple output schemes, some push-pull, some single-ended, some field coil, some PM speaker. AO-28 (preamp in B3s, and the A100) is what was intended to drive the AO-39. This is like trying to shove a square peg into a round hole, sorry.

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    • #3
      One more thought here, I am opposed to chopping organs. Still, even if I could get myself in a head space to chop an A-100 in half like this and try to sell the bottom half, I would not be so bold as to sell it as a "reverb cabinet" unless it was just that.

      The AO-44 amplifier can drive its one reverb speaker plenty loudly, and it can be fed speaker-level (unbalanced) signal straight out of your M-3 amp with very few modifications needed. I'd be hesitant to use the AO-44 to drive more than one speaker, as this would change the impedance and load. I would not suggest that. Also, this idea would forego your use of the AO-39, as well as its two main speakers, making it a waste of space for you.

      In its current form, the best that this setup would sound like is a tone cabinet with both dry and reverb signal coming out of it. The A-100 amps and speakers sound very good, and are plenty loud when properly wired up and in working condition. I am happy to see these amps get a unique use as opposed to being scrapped, or transformed into a different amp altogether. Maybe we can sort it out better if we have better photos of your hookup scheme, connectors, and the M3. Gather the M3 serial number, the letter series of AO-29 amp (type A? B? C? D? etc), as well as photo of your M-3 speaker connections to determine if it's a FC or PM speaker. We also need to know in detail how this cabinet is wired. We can't know whether both amps are still wired to the speakers in a stock fashion, or if the person who chopped this altered the wiring.

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      • #4
        After further evaluation, I hear sound from all 3 speakers. However, it's not as loud as I like it. I've taken some photos of the AO-39 amp on top because I'm not sure how to identify what type it is.
        Attached Files

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        • #5
          The serial number of my M3 is 153992. Here's some photos of that as well as the speaker.
          Attached Files

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          • #6
            And here's some photos of the connection of the cab to the organ.
            Attached Files

            Comment


            • #7
              I really appreciate your reply, " a tone cabinet with both dry and reverb signal coming out of it" is exactly how I want to use it. The built in M3 speaker is not loud enough to compete with the band so this is my way to amplify it assuming I can get it hooked up properly. I don't know what to send regarding the wiring of the speakers. If this really isn't worth the effort, I can just get a bass amp to hook up through my line out.

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              • #8
                For starters, the AO-39 amplifier (the one that you have sitting on top of the cabinet) needs a balanced input signal. Right now, it is only getting a single ended signal, because your M-3 only feeds it a single ended signal. Unless there is a transformer hiding somewhere in between the organ and tone cabinet, that's probably why you have sub-par volume. You're only utilizing one half of the power available in the AO-39.

                I use a 048025 transformer (the kind used for Leslie 122 inputs) to connect my M-100 to an FR-40 tone cabinet. If I recall correctly, I used the primary side on the M-100 amp/speakers, and the secondary side (the one with 3 wires) on the tone cabinet input.

                If anything I'm saying sounds complicated, I am sorry. I don't know what your level of expertise is, so you may want to hire a technician to assist with sorting this out.

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