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  • Leslie 771 project

    So. I've got this Leslie. I got it from a dude that sells organs, it was in his basement halfway through a job someone else had started or something, I made an offer, he wanted it gone. I looked into setting it up with my L-112, but I don't want to buy a leslie Kit, and it needs work besides, so it's sat idly by waiting for something to happen for awhile.

    I'm going to dump some more pictures of the 771s wiring mess, as well as a video if I can figure out how, so you can get an idea of what I'm working with.

    I picked up a 40s Model D the other day that seems to have a Leslie 122 (I think. will confirm) amplifier mounted inside of it. Is it an option to take that amplifier, and connect the 771s motors to it? Turn it into a 122. It's already integrated into the model D so I imagine there's no problem on the organ side. Thoughts?
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  • #2
    First, here's the sockets on the 122
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    • #3
      The horn connects to a seemingly makeshift crossover via a sketchy pair of green and black wires hot and ground. Yeah, there's painter's tape, bad connections, it's bonkers.
      You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 5 photos.

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      • #4
        Mess.
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        • #5
          I was kind of confused by your photos. I've worked on a 771, and while that may originally have been a 771 cabinet, it's not a 771 any longer. That's the wrong amp panel for a 771, and the 771, as far as I know, would not have had the traditional motor stacks.

          You may have a solid-state Leslie that's been cobbled together with a number of spare parts from different eras. It happens. The crossover looks like the crossover for a vacuum-tube Leslie amp. Most SS Leslies were bi-amped and used an electronic crossover. And those white axial capacitors on the amp boards are from the early-mid 1970s. The 771 used a modern all direct-coupled amp design, not that transformer-coupled board that dates from the late 1960s.

          Most SS Leslies used a 4 Ohm woofer, and you need a 16 Ohm woofer for a 122 amp -- and that crossover, if it's the crossover from a 122/147.
          I'm David. 'Dave' is someone else's name.

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          • Th'Rift
            Th'Rift commented
            Editing a comment
            It's a real piece of work, and yeah that is likely the case. There just aren't a lot of leslie cabinets here, or people to work on them.
            I believe I have a speaker here that will do the trick. I'll update tomorrow

        • #6
          Here's what's written on the crossover
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          • #7
            Anything with a sticker on it
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            • #8
              Originally posted by Th'Rift View Post
              Here's what's written on the crossover
              I looked it up in a 122 Service Manual, and 052803 is Leslie's part number for the ubiquitous 16Ω/800Hz crossover found in most tube Leslies with a horn and a woofer. It has H and W written on it for Horn and Woofer.

              The motor stacks are from 1980, very late in production.

              Looking again at the black metal amplifier panel, it looks like it was originally from some 11-pin four-channel SS Leslie with rotary and stationary speakers and maybe a pedal channel. I don't have all the various SS models memorized and don't have time to run through all their specs, but if you notice, the way it's hooked up, only TWO channels are functional. In the photo, one doesn't have an input, but maybe it's just disconnected. You can date the amp panel, or at least the driver modules, from date codes on the components like the axial white Mallory caps. It looks to me like two of the original output channels on that amp panel were removed along with their output transistors and wiring.

              The power supply is unfamiliar to me. Haven't seen that one before. Maybe someone else can help.

              But this thing was definitely cobbled together. Where did it come from?
              Last edited by David Anderson; 06-27-2019, 06:50 PM.
              I'm David. 'Dave' is someone else's name.

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              • #9
                I went to a piano and organ store in my town, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada. Dude had this, and a 125 both in pretty bad shape, both in a basement workshop. I was desperate for parts for my 125 so I made an offer. This thing was sitting open, fella said it was working but someone was putting in a new crossover, I think he wanted to make a quick buck off it. I'm more interested in the case and motors so I don't feel bad spending a little money on it. The 125 had been renovated and turned into an apartment building for mice. Completely destroyed save for a few tubes and components.

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                • David Anderson
                  David Anderson commented
                  Editing a comment
                  You did well in terms of parts at least. If you have a cabinet, a pair of working motor stacks, a horn driver and horn, a crossover, and a working 122 amp, you're pretty close to having a working Leslie 122.

                  You could install a rear amp hold-down bracket which you used to be able to buy at TWG and make sure the front screw hole for the amp is in the right place. Secure amp with a 7/8" 10-24 screw and t-nut.

                  The main thing you need is a 16Ω woofer like a Jensen P15LL, C15L, or Utah OEM Leslie woofer. If that speaker on the floor came out of it, you need something better.

                  That cabinet, foam drum, and motors may all be from 1980. That was around the time that Leslie production was moved from California to Illinois, and they made some changes like going from a wood lower drum to the foam drum. For example, I notice there's no horn tensioner belt; instead, you set the belt tension with wing nuts. You could retrofit a tensioner arm and pulley. Trek II sells those.

              • #10
                Would these plugs work you think? I've seen pictures of 122s with these plugged into the amplifiers

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                • David Anderson
                  David Anderson commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Yes, I've use those AC motor cords. You can patch them into the motor cables with wire nuts. You'll need four, two brown for Fast and two white for Slow. The key is that these have non-polarized plugs. Polarized plugs will not fit into the motor sockets.

                • Th'Rift
                  Th'Rift commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Awesome! Thanks for all your help, really appreciate the information.

              • #11
                If not I'll get into the terminals.

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                • #12
                  Congrats on your dedication to get the real deal working for you!
                  That 122 amp will pair nicely with the D and the motors will hang off it no issues.
                  16 ohm woofer needed! Jensen PLL15" already bagged/blown,and bought for the basket then rebuilt fresh?
                  No regrets there......closest thing to original. A used working Utah 'square back' ceramic 15" 16ohm will also sound great,
                  usually without being rebuilt,anyways they are 40+ years old.....
                  Checked the part number on your x-over against the 122/147 parts lists!Good to go!

                  The tensioner/idler arm bearing on the old style treble horn is a little bit quieter overall than a modern stack sans 'spring' IMO.
                  Still it's possible to get a good fast/slow inertia without the spring if you fiddle with it!
                  Moving them seems to affect the tension more than 'roading' and old spring style horn.

                  Happy Leslie'ing!
                  A100/251 A100/147 A102/222 B2/142 BV/147 BCV/145 M3/145 M102/145 M111/770 L101/760 T222/HL722 M111/770 no B3/C3!

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                  • Th'Rift
                    Th'Rift commented
                    Editing a comment
                    It all really just fell into place, it's crazy. I wonder if the 122 parts came from the same Leslie even. They're really not commonplace here, I rarely find one.

                • #13
                  Until I find a 16 ohm 15 I'm gonna use Two 15" 8ohm speakers from a couple of big monitors, wired in series, one on the rotor, one on the wall or something. Maybe external, in another body, DIY non rotor "extension cab" or something.

                  The motor cables are on the way, I think I'm going to leave the 122 amp where it is in the D and wire the plugs and the output to 5 1/4 inch jacks. Fast/Slow/Fast/Slow/Main. Just patch and play. Could go molex, but man they're ugly. Next purchase is a set of preamp tubes for the D, capacitor kit as well, then caps and tubes for the 122 amp. Gonna hunt for a speaker in the mean time.... I'm liking the idea of the two 15s though... will have to experiment.

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                  • David Anderson
                    David Anderson commented
                    Editing a comment
                    If you've got most of the parts for a 122, I would suggest doing it right. Not every fifteen inch speaker is going to sound right in that cabinet. The kind of woofers that have the right compliance for this kind of bass reflex cabinet have fairly stiff suspensions.

                    Please tell me you aren't planning to run 120VAC through quarter-inch jacks.

                  • Th'Rift
                    Th'Rift commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Ok, ok. I'll put the amp in the box.

                  • Th'Rift
                    Th'Rift commented
                    Editing a comment
                    And I'll hunt down a proper woofer.

                • #14
                  Eminence Delta 15B going downstairs, as it isn't overly expensive and can be found here. Plugs are en route. I removed the random amp and faceplate, put the 122 amp where it belongs. The tube contacts are spotless, under the amp looks like it was wired yesterday. Gonna clean basically everything while I wait for parts. Any tips on accessing the keybeds? I havent looked into it, but the top doesnt seem to have accessible screws, so unless its the front panel and it rolls back or something I'm not sure.

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                  • David Anderson
                    David Anderson commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Personally, I prefer the Jensen C15K or any of the vintage woofers, but others like the Delta 15B. I understand that the market is not the same in Canada.

                  • Th'Rift
                    Th'Rift commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Canada isn't so bad, it's Newfoundland man. Isolated as you can get outside of living up north. I'm in the capital, and it's way too expensive to drive to the next province even and back for a speaker. Hundreds in gas, hundreds and hundreds more to take the ferry, then back again, it's a problem here. Of course if I come across a proper woofer, I'll pick it up. In the meantime, 120 plus tax for something that works, works for me! Ya also have to keep in mind, I've never been in the same room as a working high top leslie. No idea what I'll be missing. I've only had 125s running my L112s.

                • #15
                  Update, and questions. I recieved the nonpolarized motor control plugs, and installed them. On the horn I put the white slow cable on the wires leading to the fatter end of the motor, and the brown to the smaller end wires. I then did the same for the woofer motor. I turn on the organ and the spin as they should on chorale. Switch to tremolo, and they stop. My first thought was switch must be busted, and sure enough it had been disconnected from the inside. I replaced it with an identical switch from another Hammond. However when I switch to trem, the motors still stop. Specifically the little black axle from the small end of the motor, which touches the big wheel, moves off the wheel which in turn stops spinning. Now, when I switch the upper plugs and put the white in the fast socket and the brown in the slow socket it spins fast on chorale, and still stops completely on tremolo. This doesn't occur when I do the same with the lower plugs.

                  Also of note, the thunder sounds are happening less frequently with the motors going, and the wires that shocked me the other day no longer shock me. Oh, and when I did have the fast speed in the horns the organ sounded absolutely amazing. This thing is a unicorn.

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