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Oiling motors on a 122

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  • Oiling motors on a 122

    I've done my annual maintenance on my 122 but have a question for those w/ knowledge of the oiling method. What I do is split the fast and slow motors and oil the shaft on each end right where it goes into the motor itself, not in the 5 or 6 holes next to the shaft. I figure its more direct and I'm not getting oil on the armature. I cant see how putting oil in those holes and hoping you got it into the felts is right . Plus, how much oil do you put in those holes. ? Seems like you could over oil it. I do not do a complete dis assembly w/ all those o rings and washers.

    I also oiled on both ends in the small holes and the shaft for the unit that is below the motor. Forget what that is called.
    Is this a good method?

  • #2
    First off, you can *dip* the motors in oil and not hurt them. The only place you really can't abide any oil is on the rubber tire when the slow motor engages.. Keep that clean.

    If it flings oil, you know you got too much. Oil on the armature will fling around a little, so that's good to avoid, but it won't specifically damage anything.

    It sounds like you have good instincts on this so doing what you're doing is probably more than sufficient.

    Oil on the rotor pivots are far more important than the motors, just sayin'.



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    • #3
      I separate the motors and oil the felts all the time. The felts act as a reservoir. There is felt inside the bearing ends of the slow motors, so you are oiling the felts when you oil those bearings. It's good to put a bit on the shaft, too, but oiling the felts is standard procedure on any bearing that uses them.

      Many Leslie motors, especially the slow motors, are being destroyed from not being oiled or properly maintained. It is the most overlooked thing in Leslie maintenance. People ignore it until they start causing problems, at which point it's too late. The bearing and shafts are damaged. It's like driving your car and never checking the oil until the engine locks up.
      I'm David. 'Dave' is someone else's name.

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      • #4
        Thank you guys for the information. I believe I've now got a good handle on these motors and understand them. I'm somewhat new to maintaining the Leslie but w/ help from the forum, it's really not complicated.
        I did oil the slow motor "ports" and put a bit on the shaft.
        another thing, i vacuum and carefully wipe out the dust in the cabinet and components. Surprising how much can accumulate in there over time.
        I see so many Leslies and organs for sale and they are filthy inside. You would think people would clean them up a bit prior to selling.

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        • #5
          Sometimes rather than taking apart the stack, like on the bottom rotor stack, I use a small disposable syringe/needle you get at a pharmacy/drug store, fill it with some oil and inject the oil into the felt to saturate it. A needle dropper works wonders on these hard to get at locations on the slow motors and dispenses tiny drops giving the oil time to fall into the tiny holes.

          Rather than a squeeze bottle with a needle, the syringe plunger adds more directed force, more controllable.



          Click image for larger version

Name:	?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.freeimageslive.co.uk%2Ffiles%2Fimages009%2Fsyringe_isolated.preview.jpg&f=1.jpg
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          • #6
            Originally posted by Goff View Post
            Sometimes rather than taking apart the stack, like on the bottom rotor stack, I use a small disposable syringe/needle you get at a pharmacy/drug store, fill it with some oil and inject the oil into the felt to saturate it. A needle dropper works wonders on these hard to get at locations on the slow motors and dispenses tiny drops giving the oil time to fall into the tiny holes.

            Rather than a squeeze bottle with a needle, the syringe plunger adds more directed force, more controllable.



            Click image for larger version

Name:	?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.freeimageslive.co.uk%2Ffiles%2Fimages009%2Fsyringe_isolated.preview.jpg&f=1.jpg
Views:	132
Size:	17.4 KB
ID:	660418
            I remember going into a chemist and asking for one of those syringes for a very similar oiling purpose. I got a very funny look which I assume is because they thought I was in need of an urgent fix...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by alpine View Post

              they thought I was in need of an urgent fix...
              Diabetics buy these all the time but the shorter needles.

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