Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Yamaha MIDI hack possible - ?

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Yamaha MIDI hack possible - ?



    Question forthe MIDI gurus, with apologies that it's not a really interesting question about something likeMIDI-fying a Rodgers console with full AGO pedalboard, to run Hauptwerk. My aims are much humbler: driving a Peavey Spectrum Organ module (Hammond B3 samples) with a MIDI-fied Yamaha (my screen name *is* toasterDude, after all! [:)] ).</P>


    My grand plan is tofind an Allen Sheraton and MIDIfy it for this purpose... but for now I'm working with a humble $50 Yamaha EL-7. For my purposes so far, it works great -- kind of like having a MIDI-fied M100 -- but there's one problem. The expression pedal on the EL-7 generates CC #11 data; whereas my Spectrum organ (like many other modules I've come across) only responds to CC #7.</P>


    WhenI'm hooked into my PC, I can easily map the CC data from #11 to #7 with MidiOx... but I'm hoping to come up with a setup that will work independent of the PC. The best option I can come up with so far is to purchase a dedicated inline MIDI event processor box from MIDI Solutions, about $130. But it seems kind of silly to spend almost 3x what the EL-7 cost me to begin with. So my question: is it somehow possible to retro-engineer the Yamaha's output, to have it produce CC#7 data instead of CC#11?</P>


    Sorry if this is a dumb question... but I'd feel dumber if I dropped $$ on a commercial solution for this, and there turned out to be a wayI could've doneit myself.</P>


    thanks for any thoughts-</P>


    Scott</P>
    Nobody loves me but my mother,
    And she could be jivin' too...

    --BB King

  • #2
    Re: Yamaha MIDI hack possible - ?



    Not a dumb question TD. Of course it's the modules that should be modified, not the organ. CC7 is Main Volume, CC11 is Expression, so the Yamaha's doing it right. I think it would be more expensive to hack around with either set of electronics than to buy the event processor. Can you not alter the settings on the module, then?</p>

    I used to run B4 from an even older Yamaha, the HC4. that sent CC11 as well, but that's what B4 was expecting. These older organs were usually pretty simple on MIDI, with fixed settings with regards to channelling, programme change messages and CC messages.</p>

    Andy</p>

    </p>
    It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

    New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

    Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
    Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
    Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
    Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Yamaha MIDI hack possible - ?

      [quote user="andyg"]


      Of course it's the modules that should be modified, not the organ. CC7 is Main Volume, CC11 is Expression, so the Yamaha's doing it right. </P>


      [/quote]</P>


      Ah, a man who knows his MIDI! I agree, CC#11 is actually the correct way to go, especially in case of a scenario where the module might just be one MIDI part among many. --Wouldn't do to be turning down the volume on the whole ensemble. (by the way, doesn't it seem like Yamaha *always* do things right?!? I never cease to be amazed at the quality of engineering that has gone into the Yamaha products I've bought.)</P>


      Unfortunately the Peavey module is from circa 1993, so it's pretty barebones - no chance of reassigning anything there. I think I will go ahead and pick up the little MIDI Solutions box... a standalone event mapper could be a very useful thing to have around, after all. Hopefully it'll come handy for other applications as well.</P>


      Sigh... I knew it was a long shot, but I thought I'd ask anyway! Thanks for the response.</P>


      Scott</P>
      <P mce_keep="true"></P>
      Nobody loves me but my mother,
      And she could be jivin' too...

      --BB King

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Yamaha MIDI hack possible - ?



        Well I went ahead and picked up the MIDI Solutions Event Processor, and while it was kinda pricey, I have to admit it's really cool. It's just a little project box with one MIDI in, one MIDI out -- powers itself just via the MIDI connection. And there are I believe 10 separate mapping instances you can program in. --Pretty much does anything MIDI Ox can do, but no PC required.</P>


        The only difficulty is in trying to program the individual maps... you do thisvia SysEx, which I usually have no problem with. But the way they've set it up to handle variable values is (to me) kind of counter-intuitive. I ended up having to download their programming software to program it; no big deal, because the software is free. But it works a treat, because you just select the basic parameters of each mapping instance, and it generates the necessary SysEx for you and sends it (via MIDI of course!) from your PC to the unit.</P>


        Anyway this was a nice clean solution for my problem. I'd recommend the little box despite the difficulties in programming, just because their software is so easy, and because the box promises to be a highly useful little gadget to have around.</P>


        td</P>
        Nobody loves me but my mother,
        And she could be jivin' too...

        --BB King

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Yamaha MIDI hack possible - ?

          Their gear isn't cheap and I agree that programming it could be a touch easier, but the quality is there and it does the job it says it will. I use one of their boxes that will take an volume pedal (Yamaha FC7 in my case) and convert it to a MIDI controller - usually CC11 in my case. Of course, then I went and bought a controller keyboard with a volume pedal socket that could do the same.......[:S]
          It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

          New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

          Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
          Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
          Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
          Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Yamaha MIDI hack possible - ?



            [quote user="andyg"] I agree that programming it could be a touch easier {...}[/quote]</P>


            Oh good, it's not just me then! Honestly I was a little taken aback by the difficulty, because I speak pretty fluent SysEx [8-|]... butI think it has most to do with the fact that their instructions are just a little fold-up sheet with 8 or 10 examples.</P>


            If anyone comes across this thread later, a little helpful advice: the MIDI Solutions programming software is especially helpful because it not only generates and delivers the necessary SysEx messages, it also displays them on-screen for you. So if (like me) your real aim is to be able to program the little box from a MIDI controller like the Peavey PC1600 or the Kenton Control Freak, you can go to school on their software -- i.e., you can use it to help decipher the anemic little instruction sheet and figure out howthe boxwants to handle variables. Anyway cheers-</P>


            Scott</P>
            Nobody loves me but my mother,
            And she could be jivin' too...

            --BB King

            Comment

            Working...
            X