Ebay Classic organs

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

MIDI convert Rodgers Asilomar 780 analogue sound w/t digital matrix console control

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • MIDI convert Rodgers Asilomar 780 analogue sound w/t digital matrix console control

    Hi, if anyone knows a straightforward way to MIDI this Rodgers that I describe below, please clue me in. Moderator jbird640 says that someone must make a board to interface between my equipment that this consoles weird matrix boards. I have number 27 of 40 Rodgers Asilomar 780 organs that were manufactured (only in 1983, this one on December 12th). If you are not familiar with this organ, it is a strange hybrid of a classic organ and a theater organ. It is basically the same organ as the 770 Exeter Classic/Church organ with the stops and voicing tweaked to be a hybrid of a classical and a theater organ. It is a two manual, with the great stop tabs a labeled and voiced as classic organ, the swell as a theater organ, and pedal as a mixture of both worlds. The voices are analogue with digital signal processing and effects. The console keying and controls are fully digital, but a weird combination of digital matrix and voltage on/off non-matrix-ed to the multifunction board the CPU mainboard plugs into. To MIDI this console is not straightforward from my perspective. Rodgers, famous for keeping secrets and being hard to work with, decided dabble in temporary insanity by using different methods of console wiring in one organ. The stop rails are matrix digital using momentary push down pop back up tabs. From the bench their appearance is much like a Wurlitzer, but the keying is magnetic actuation of Hayes field transistors. The Swell stop rail is matrix-ed alone, but is three 16 bit buffered matrix boards, connected together by ribbon cables. The great tabs are done the same way, but is a wild daisy-chain of the three boards of the great stop rail, the separate LED lighted transposer control board, and the separate LED Crescendo Level Display, and LED Tutti-On boards. All of that ends up in one matrix-ed mix down to a one inch wide ribbon cable, ending in a 16 pin connector, that plugs into the digital multifunction board, into which the main CUP plugs into. Now, so far, this in itself is pretty standard as to how everything is done today by most digital organ builders. But Rodgers could not bring itself to make all the digital controls matrix style. The pedal is magnetic keyed with individual wires to the digital multifunction board. The two manuals are matrix-ed together in a daisy chain and again, like the stop rail boards, are routed through a one inch ribbon cable to a 16 pin connector that plugs into the multifunction board.

    I have a Classic Organ Works of Canada MIDI interface. It is looking for 12 volts on/off not a matrix. That is driven by a M-Audio 4x4 USB to MIDI box connected to a HP Zbook G2 Mobile Workstation with four solid state hard drives, 32 gigabytes of DDR5 Ram and a Nivida Quadro 4 gigabyte video card. I built the virtual organ on the computer with jOrgan 3.20 and do not duplicate/share any of the sound-fonts. Each voice tab has its one distinct voice. I can make the Classic Organ Works interface work after gutting the Rodgers, except for the stop rails. I do not want to run touchscreen monitors. I am not a Hauptwerk fan because it was designed to clone organs from around the planet and bring them to your home or studio. But I agree with Cameron Carpenter, I want one organ that I can learn so well, that I can master it like a concert pianist masters his own personal touring piano. So, I want to use all my Rodgers 780 console's controls, not touch screens. Fifteen years ago, I achieved that. I MIDI-ed a Allen two manual console that was a walk in the park, because Allen terminated every wire in the console on a massive pin block located on the right inside rear wall of the console. I used hollow barrel connectors to slide onto the pins. One tiny drop of solder melded together a wire and a barrel connector. So easy! Allen kindly color coded every wire in the console differently. No problem! Rodgers? No way! They have every wire on the pedal the same dark color of green. I will have to trace every wire with a battery and meter. The same with the 18 great division pistons and the 16 Swell pistons, and the 18 toe studs. I will have to trace every single wire. What fun! The two expression shoes and the crescendo have quality rheostats so they are easy. What is making me miserable is the matrix Rodgers uses a propitiatory pin-out that is unknown as to what devices can interface with it and read the signals designed for the Rodgers multifunction and CPU boards. The CPU processor chip on the mainboard is a 16 bit MOSTEK Z80. Rodgers say the LEDS are 12 volts. The circuit boards are are, but I would be surprised if the LEDs were not down at 5 volts. So there you have it. Can you help? Sincerely, Joel (age 66 and frustrated.)
    Steven "Joel" Speirs
    2001 Johannus Rembrandt 3000 AGO, w/t all options. Romantic & Baroque voice samples on 9 voicecards, Simultaneous polyphony: 576. Three black wooden-key manuals w/t rosewood sharps, 64 pistons, 15 toe studs, three expression pedals, crescendo pedal. 57 lighted draw knobs, 24 centered rocker tabs rail & LED display.

  • #2
    I'm not sure what you consider "straightforward". Your rather disparaging comments about the 780 design makes me that you might not have the technical ability to handle this. Be aware that at this stage of organ design, Rodgers was well in advance of Rodgers as far as digital control. The Allen was easy to convert because that part of their early system was brute-force analog. Rodgers was doing parallel to digital conversion of data, processing via microprocessor, and serial back to parallel for connecting to the sound generation circuits.

    Rodgers used the same color of wire for many functions because the wires break out of the wiring harness in the order that they are to be connected. If the harness is built right, the wiring is right. By the way, Hammond originated that approach way back in the 40's!

    The keys on this organ, manual and pedal, all switch 12 volts DC into Parallel to Serial converter boards. You can tie into those signals in parallel with the Rodgers circuits to get keying information.

    If you want to use the Rodgers CPU control system to provide combination action and stop switch on/off function, then you don't need to tie into any of the piston inputs--just the lamp output drive signals. Likewise you'd need to tie into the LED drive circuits. (The LEDs are driven by 12 volts, but there are series resistors to limit the current.)

    The easiest way to get the piston on/off and stop on/off data is to decode the data stream in duplicate with the Rodgers circuits. It is simple circuitry using 8 bit latching shift registers driven by clock, data, and strobe signals. You'll need to acquire or fabricate boards that have this circuitry. The decoded signals can then go into MIDI encoder circuits (just like the keys) to drive your virtual organ.

    If you are not up for doing that work, you could remove all the Rodgers circuits, and replace the stop tabs with real moving dual-magnetic stop tabs (SAMs). If you wanted to keep the LED stop tabs, you can strip the parallel to serial encoding circuits off the tab boards and use the Hall effect sensor outputs, but beware that they when active they provide a low signal (i.e., pressing a tab gives you zero volts output).

    Comment


    • #3
      toodles,

      I was hoping you'd see this post and chime in. Do you happen to know if anyone has made a MIDI converter that will simply wire directly to those Hall effect transistors on the stop rail and give him stop on/off data? It would seem that someone would offer an easy way to MIDI those switches and provide a driving voltage for the LED's, since there were so many of these LED-tab organs made.

      This poster is a friend of mine, and at some point I will drop by to see his project. I have encouraged him to find a suitable interface that will make use of the existing switches. At this point, I believe he has already more or less gutted the console, so using any of the Rodgers digital control circuitry is probably not an option.

      But of course a typical MIDI interface (such as you might get from Artisan or Classic MIDI Works, etc.) would probably have its own inputs and outputs and wouldn't depend on the Rodgers CPU. And in the case of this 780, the CPU board was not working properly. I actually spent a great many hours (and $$$) trying to make it work for its previous owner. We found large numbers of 4094's dead, as well as many keying diodes open or shorted, leading me to conclude it had been hit by lightning and was not salvageable as an analog organ.

      He has discovered that all the LED's light up, and of course all the mechanical switches on the keys and pedals are good, as are the pistons. A garden variety MIDI kit will easily wire to all those ordinary switches, so he basically just needs an interface for the stop rail.
      John
      ----------
      *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

      https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

      Comment


      • #4
        The easiest way to wire to the stop rail is to de-populate the encoding and decoding shift registers, just leaving the Hall effect switches. Each sensor will have to have an inverter on it, or the MIDI encoder will have to be able to be wired for an active low signal--either in software or hardware. Of course, the control system will have to have on/off latching and outputs to drive the LED's; 12 V will be fine if the circuit board resistors are kept in place (probably in resistor packs, if I remember right).

        I don't know of anyone who makes a direct converter for these organs.

        That's a lot of fiddling around with connecting to and from the circuit boards in ways not originally intended, so it really might be just easier to switch out to Syndyne SAM units. I'd reinforce the stop rail supports if doing that, as the rail would weigh a lot more than the LED system.

        A third alternative would be to buy a bunch of reed switches and figure out how to mount them so the tab magnets switch them. It's some tricky spacing, but if you can figure it out for one, just duplicate it another 79 times or so. Then the MIDI control system will just need to see those as reversible piston inputs and indicator outputs, but most systems handle that.

        A fourth alternative would be to find some mechanical switches (tact switches might work), so the magnets push the switch on. Again, the physical placement is the trick.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by toodles View Post
          the MIDI encoder will have to be able to be wired for an active low signal
          I believe that Roman Sowa of midi-hardware.com makes a scanner card suitable for this. In fact I think this is what I used when I MIDIfied my local church analogue organ a few years ago. The bus goes to earth. They have worked faultlessly.

          John Reimer

          Comment


          • #6
            Toodles, your last sentence to me what I wanted to know... Thanks!!!

            Click image for larger version

Name:	Rodgers 780 in my apartment just after delivery.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	120.8 KB
ID:	604409
            Toodles... Thanks a million. As I said in the title, your last sentence gave me all that I needed. I can easily configure jOrgan to reverse the low/high signal sensing to achieve the desired on/off of the stop tabs. For $130 I can buy a board from Classic Organ Works that will do the job, that will also power the 5-volt LED's on the organ, and that board is capable of far more than I need, and plugs into my existing MIDI interface. That board is sold by their Classic Organ Works division, not their MIDI WORKS division, as it was intended for actual pipe organ use.

            Now since this is my first post on this forum, even though I have been a member since 2012, (I read here quite often), I want to run my mouth a bit to let everyone know what I can do. I'm capable of MIDI-ing a farm tractor, if I have just a bit of the right info. You gave that to me. For that I thank you. My problem with this organ was, that I have never before been inside a Rodgers LED Tab organ console, until three days ago. I have never seen such a hodgepodge of different cabling methods as Rodgers build into this console. They could have easily matrix-ed the pedal, pistons, toe tabs, and used used ribbon cables coming up to the multifunction board, like they did for the Keyboards, Stop Rails, Transposer, TUTTI display, and Crescendo Display. Instead Rodgers used individual wires for the pedal notes, pistons, and toe tabs.

            When I gutted the electronics out of this lighting destroyed console, I was forced to cut every one of the very thin clear plastic wire ties to remove everything. That individual wiring method left me with tricolored vermicelli hanging everywhere, and in only three colors. The pedal magnet wires are all green with a common blue ground , the piston wires are all brown and yellow, and the toe tab wires are all brown and blue. All I need now is pasta sauce. The organ should have been Italian... But I owned a Viscount and it was totally ribbon cabled. Since Rodgers was so ahead of its time in digital console controls, surely running all ribbon cables would have saved then a ton of time and money. I would have thought that Rodgers R&D would have come up with the idea of using all ribbon cabling.

            I will critique any design made more convoluted that necessary by engineers, and I don't care what device it is, or what brand name it carries. "KISS" is my thing when it comes to engineering... Better known as, Keep It Simple Stupid. The United States Marine Corps drilled that into me (pun intended).

            Rodgers has always been difficult to work with. Only insiders have total access to all of their tech info. Many service manuals for many of their models simply never existed. A tech had to apply what he learned from other hopefully similar manuals. Many boards and parts are simply no longer available. Meaning that many Rodgers organs can never be repaired, and are now just beautiful pieces of furniture. Of course this gives virtual organ enthusiasts like me a chance to get a free console to MIDI. So who am I to complain?

            By comparison, Allen is very forthcoming, shares all their information, can, and will, provide a manual for anything they ever built from day one, and parts as well. They even take old blown boards from field techs back and retro fit them to work again in their very old organs, even their analogue models. Allen will do anything for anyone, and a lot of the time at no cost, even if the person is not a current customer. That 1962 Allen I MIDI'ed 15 years ago? Allen spent an hour on the phone with me on three separate occasions helping me track down parts and information. When it came to being people persons, Allen has always had the jump on Rodgers. Well on almost everyone. The only musical instrument builder that I ever encountered that was a friendly as Allen was Baldwin Piano Company, but I can only speak for their piano division. I never had dealings with their organ division. Maybe information from Rodgers is not difficult to obtain for some people on OrganForum.com, but I am not a professional organ technician, just a amateur radio operator organist/pianist turned tech-enthusiast; so as to get the best bang for my retirement buck. It is for your information, kind sir, that I will be eternally grateful.


            Originally posted by toodles View Post
            I'm not sure what you consider "straightforward". Your rather disparaging comments about the 780 design makes me that you might not have the technical ability to handle this. Be aware that at this stage of organ design, Rodgers was well in advance of Rodgers as far as digital control. The Allen was easy to convert because that part of their early system was brute-force analog. Rodgers was doing parallel to digital conversion of data, processing via microprocessor, and serial back to parallel for connecting to the sound generation circuits.

            Rodgers used the same color of wire for many functions because the wires break out of the wiring harness in the order that they are to be connected. If the harness is built right, the wiring is right. By the way, Hammond originated that approach way back in the 40's!

            The keys on this organ, manual and pedal, all switch 12 volts DC into Parallel to Serial converter boards. You can tie into those signals in parallel with the Rodgers circuits to get keying information.

            If you want to use the Rodgers CPU control system to provide combination action and stop switch on/off function, then you don't need to tie into any of the piston inputs--just the lamp output drive signals. Likewise you'd need to tie into the LED drive circuits. (The LEDs are driven by 12 volts, but there are series resistors to limit the current.)

            The easiest way to get the piston on/off and stop on/off data is to decode the data stream in duplicate with the Rodgers circuits. It is simple circuitry using 8 bit latching shift registers driven by clock, data, and strobe signals. You'll need to acquire or fabricate boards that have this circuitry. The decoded signals can then go into MIDI encoder circuits (just like the keys) to drive your virtual organ.

            If you are not up for doing that work, you could remove all the Rodgers circuits, and replace the stop tabs with real moving dual-magnetic stop tabs (SAMs). If you wanted to keep the LED stop tabs, you can strip the parallel to serial encoding circuits off the tab boards and use the Hall effect sensor outputs, but beware that they when active they provide a low signal (i.e., pressing a tab gives you zero volts output).
            Last edited by StevenJoelSpeirs; 05-13-2018, 01:44 AM.
            Steven "Joel" Speirs
            2001 Johannus Rembrandt 3000 AGO, w/t all options. Romantic & Baroque voice samples on 9 voicecards, Simultaneous polyphony: 576. Three black wooden-key manuals w/t rosewood sharps, 64 pistons, 15 toe studs, three expression pedals, crescendo pedal. 57 lighted draw knobs, 24 centered rocker tabs rail & LED display.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks John, toodles last sentence made my LED, uh, DAY.
              Steven "Joel" Speirs
              2001 Johannus Rembrandt 3000 AGO, w/t all options. Romantic & Baroque voice samples on 9 voicecards, Simultaneous polyphony: 576. Three black wooden-key manuals w/t rosewood sharps, 64 pistons, 15 toe studs, three expression pedals, crescendo pedal. 57 lighted draw knobs, 24 centered rocker tabs rail & LED display.

              Comment


              • #8
                Just remember that the LED's on the Rodgers board are designed for 12V input with the resistors on the board--if you use 5V to drive them, you'll probably want to change out the resistors.

                I think your complaint is that Rodgers didn't design the organ for easy retrofit to do what you want. You could really hardly expect them to have that as a prime consideration. What you see as a complicated approach was probably a simple, direct approach for Rodgers at the time. They really don't have three different keying approaches--they all use the same approach: parallel data from the switches goes into a shift register which converts the signal to serial data. The only thing different is where the shift registers are located.

                It made sense to have both input and output data on the stop tabs--since both data streams are needed.

                It made sense to only have input data for the keyboards, and pedals. And I guess they put the pedals into the MFB because the board had the real estate to allow it without needing a special circuit board just for the pedals. The pistons were a mixed bag because some needed output (the lighted ones) and some didn't.

                By the way, the 890 is built along the same lines as the 780, just that it has the lighted drawknobs and rockers.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yea, you are right. I have spent time doing a dozen edits of my reply above trying to sound less cranky. Correct, Rodgers did not design any organ to undergo a retrofit. It is just as you say, my complaint is concerning all of the spaghetti hanging that I now have to re-tie-wrap and trace. Your technical comments concerning why they did things they way that they did are interesting. I just do not understand why they did not carry the ribbon cable idea froward even in the non-matrix-ed areas. All of the current organs of every company I know of are totally ribbon now. It saves assembly time, and time is money. It also saves money on wire itself, which saves more money. You would think as clever as Rodgers was in from 1970-1990, that they would have come up with the idea to use all ribbon. Yes, you are also right about the 890 being constructed like the 780, but I never had to gut it. My 890 was in perfect condition. Bye the way, both my 890 and my current 780 cosmetically look like they were built yesterday. For that I consider myself very lucky. My Allen was in a church in Texarkana, Arkansas for 20 years sitting next to a window that allowed the sunlight to bleach out the left half of the console. The effect was weird because it was at an angle, so the sun only reached it at one certain point of each day. I tried top correct it without success. The entire console would have had to be stripped down to the bare wood and built back up again.
                  Steven "Joel" Speirs
                  2001 Johannus Rembrandt 3000 AGO, w/t all options. Romantic & Baroque voice samples on 9 voicecards, Simultaneous polyphony: 576. Three black wooden-key manuals w/t rosewood sharps, 64 pistons, 15 toe studs, three expression pedals, crescendo pedal. 57 lighted draw knobs, 24 centered rocker tabs rail & LED display.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    "Now" is about 35 years later and ribbon cable was not nearly as common back then outside of data processing equipment.

                    The real issue, though, with using ribbon cable for the pedals and manuals is that the cable needs a circuit board for the attaching connectors. I've never seen a circuit board as large as it would have to be to cover the pedalboard and very rarely one as wide as for a complete manual. So Rodgers chose to use discrete wires for those switch-to-encoder connections. Had there been a cost-effective way to implement ribbon cable connections to the pedals and manuals, I'm sure Rodgers would have chosen that route.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Having converted a number of Rodgers and Allen consoles I have come to the conclusion that in most cases it has been easiest to gut as much of the dated electronics as possible in both cases. I don't attempt to reuse Rodgers serial (SPI) channel equipment except for the very latest examples. I convert any -12v keying or -16v SAMs voltages to 3.3v or 5v for keying and have modified -16v supplies to +16 with properly grounded chassis. I'm currently working with a coupler rail that used old 40x series CMOS chips and don't even want to guess what speed and mode they ran at and just how static prone they might be.

                      Once the equipment is free of the old analog voltage polarities it's possible to use generic encoders and decoders to handle the keys and controls. Everything ends up being serial with conventional SPI channels or matrix, usually 8x8 or the Allen 11x6. With Allen stops I use some flexible 64 GPIO boards that are the slower I2C which is still good enough for the stops. Reuse as much existing wiring as possible and the project becomes manageable.

                      I know I'm talking generalities here rather than Rodgers 770 specifics, but I get concerned when I see attempts to adjust to arbitrary voltages and polarities when it isn't necessary.

                      EDIT: Of course I keep a 12v supply for Rodgers lamps but drive them via 5v circuits and open collector chips like the ULN2803A.
                      http://www.kinkennon.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Joel, you need to keep in mind the basic concept of the LED. It is not actually a "lamp" in the usual sense. An LED is a "light-emitting-diode" and as such it does not consume current like a light bulb or other common electrical device. It simply passes electricity the same way any other diode does, and in the process, it gives off some light, a mere byproduct of its passing current through.

                        That is why an LED always REQUIRES that there be a resistor in the circuit in series with the LED. That is why the little circuit boards in the Rodgers have a resistor for each LED already mounted there. They are essential. If an LED is simply connected across a source of current, even if the voltage is very small, it will eventually burn up, probably VERY quickly. The resistor must be there to dissipate current, and the LED just acts like one of the conductors in the circuit, with the useful side-effect that it gives off light.

                        So, whatever kind of interface you use, connect the driving voltage to the end of the resistor away from the LED and it will work perfectly and last for decades. I've never seen one of those LED's burn out on a Rodgers organ.

                        We've gotten into some technical discussion here, but it still seems to me that SOMEBODY out there must make a simple, ready-to-install, drop-in adapter board that will accept the incoming "momentary contact" pulses from those Hall effect transistors, and will convert that to a "stop on" MIDI signal, and likewise provide 12 volts to light up the LEDs.
                        John
                        ----------
                        *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

                        https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Like all diodes, LEDs have a fixed voltage drop across them, though it's usually higher than your average signal diode. They are specified with a maximum forward current, and that's the purpose of the limiting resistor, which as JBird said, is necessary.

                          Artisan has a 32 input/driver lighted piston board that could be used for encoding the Rodgers LED tabs, but it's for use with the Artisan MicroMIDI system. Not that the Artisan system isn't a fine way to go. I imagine that the Hall effect input operating on negative logic (0=true) could be handled in software. A quick email to Artisan or phone call ought to get an answer.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I ordered everything I need to complete the project from Digi-Key.com. I'm using your suggestion for using the glass enclosed reed switches attaching then to the existing Hall Effect sensors with a single drop from a hot-glue-gun. My Classic organ works MCU only looks for 12 volts for note/on and could care less about the current, so I will cater to the Rodgers LED tabs needs. I will run the each individual LED in series with each Glass Reed Switch, ignoring everything on the stop-rail existing boards, only using the boards magnets and LEDS and using the Hall Effect Sensors as mounts for the reed switches. Since I will not use the existing circuitry, I will need to know the value of the individual resistors I need to use to keep from blowing the LEDS. Do you happen to know? I can read the values of the resistors populating the boards but they are involved in the matrix circularity. I found that lead 15 and 16 on the ribbon cable lights up all the LEDS on both stop rails. If I remove the voltage are reapply it every five seconds, it steps the stop-rails through the Rodgers factory default general piston settings that are remembered by the stop-rail matrix broads when the power is off. If I know (without error) what the individual resistors values will need to be for a single LED, I'm home free without blowing any LEDS.

                            As far as the keyboards are concerned, I'm coming off the whiskers on the bottom of those boards, with individual wires (Cat-5 Ethernet cable) to the Molex connectors on top of MCU. The pistons I'm rewiring the same way. I am also rewiring the, toe tabs, and the pedal board reed switches with Ethernet cable to make everything uniform and more sturdy than the micro fine wire Rodgers used. The Rodgers thin wires will not hold onto the Molex connectors anyway, as they require for 24 gauge wire, and the MCU requires Molex connectors. So, that is that. My only problem now is the value of individual resistors needed for each individual LED. What do you think?

                            Toodles, JBird just emailed me while I was replaying here, so I returned to edit this. Here is what he had to say...

                            According to the Rodgers schematic, the series resistor for each stop tab LED is 470 ohms when used in a 12 volt circuit. These resistors would have yellow, violet, and brown bands, in that order. There is probably also a silver or gold band to indicate the tolerance, but it is not important. The resistors can be very low wattage. I'm sure 1/8 watt will do, as the LED's don't draw more than a few thousandths of a watt.

                            Glad you found some help at Digi-Key. Those people are really nice. Keep up the good work!
                            John
                            Last edited by StevenJoelSpeirs; 05-16-2018, 07:57 PM.
                            Steven "Joel" Speirs
                            2001 Johannus Rembrandt 3000 AGO, w/t all options. Romantic & Baroque voice samples on 9 voicecards, Simultaneous polyphony: 576. Three black wooden-key manuals w/t rosewood sharps, 64 pistons, 15 toe studs, three expression pedals, crescendo pedal. 57 lighted draw knobs, 24 centered rocker tabs rail & LED display.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              John, Check out the reply I made to toodles. It has my final game plan for the console. I got your email and returned here to edit the replies accordingly. and included your information about the resistors in my reply to toodles. Thanks, Joel
                              Steven "Joel" Speirs
                              2001 Johannus Rembrandt 3000 AGO, w/t all options. Romantic & Baroque voice samples on 9 voicecards, Simultaneous polyphony: 576. Three black wooden-key manuals w/t rosewood sharps, 64 pistons, 15 toe studs, three expression pedals, crescendo pedal. 57 lighted draw knobs, 24 centered rocker tabs rail & LED display.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X