Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Sequencers revisited

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #46
    Ok ... I am convinced enough ... desperate enough ... to want to give this thing a try. I simply can't get my choir to sing to organ accompaniment. Mainly because it is physically behind them but also because I don't conduct much when I accompany. The final cut-off is about it. This works with piano for some odd reason but organ and they just fall to peices. The Anthem I want to do for Easter will have more moving parts: brass, handbells ... I see a train wreck looming, unless I can also get an organist, which maybe I could have, if I made the arrangements last year. Besides, there are several other anthems with delicious organ accompaniments I would like to try, and I would quickly exhaust our music budget if I was constantly bringing in guest organists. Not that I know any.

    So that out of the way, and I know you good gentlemen and ladies will politely gloss over my earlier holier than thou attitude towards sequenced organ accompaniment and help me put a working system together by Easter Sunday. Preferably Palm Sunday so I can work out kinks. I had linked an MR-200 Sequencer proprietary to Rodgers Instruments. I like that I wouldn't have much trouble describing it to the Trustees who would have to approve the purchase. Currently unknown is how the organ recognizes the sequencer. How and where they need to be in proximity to each other. John mentions using his to start the Processional. Is the sequencer where he can physically control it or must he rely on someone else? Are there 'remotes'? My organ does not have MIDI tabs. Each division has two MIDI pistons and it is my impression that they are input controls. There is a set of the usual MIDI IN/OUT/THRU jacks under the keydesk, and it is my impression that they are active full time, not only when MIDI pistons are pressed on the console.

    As I understand it from this thread, the sequencer does not record stop changes but only piston changes? However it can make piston changes occur during playback? Would the dedicated sequencer made by Rodgers have better integration in this regard? Would I be able to record not just piston changes but stop changes as well? I really don' know anything about this aspect of digital organs because I haven't been that interested before. I can get up to speed fairly quickly if it is presented as if to someone mentally challenged. So, to summarize, I would like to know: what must the initial configuration of the organ be in order to be controlled by the sequencer? How quickly does the organ recognize the start of a sequence? Do you set the initial stops on a piston in the sequence? Must all stop changes be done with a piston? Thanks.

    Comment


    • samibe
      samibe commented
      Editing a comment
      What is your organ? The extent of the MIDI implementation on the organ affects how the sequencer needs to be set up. It also depends on how complicated the organ accompaniment needs to be. A song with only one registration and swell/crescendo position will only require note on/off (to and from the organ) to produce the song. A song with several registrations with full expression will require note on/off, stop (or piston) controls, and expression control.
      John's sequencer is an Allen module with a remote, IIRC. Also, John's use of pistons is a way he used to get around the different stop lists between his organ at home and the organ at his church.
      Last edited by samibe; 01-28-2019, 11:48 AM.

    #47
    Thanks, the organ is a Rodgers Trillium Masterpiece 928. I suppose MIDI is fairly extensively implemented from the looks of things. When I asked about John's setup it was to learn exactly how the 'remote' is used. Rodgers has a sequencer branded as such that functions much like the Allen sequencer. The Rodgers sequencer would be an easy sell to the people pulling the purse strings. A used laptop less so. Most of my questions are procedural and operational in nature. It might seem simple to you to "use a VPO on a computer just for the midi sequencing abilities" but that is not simple to me. I suppose I will figure it out though.

    Comment


    • samibe
      samibe commented
      Editing a comment
      Good point. That looks like an awesome organ to play and the MIDI implementation looks complete. You might have to change some of the settings for MIDI in the QuickMenu so that the organ will send and receive information for the notes, shoes, and stops. I don't think the MIDI pistons would do anything as far as a sequencer is concerned (they seem to control the additional voices in the build in MIDI box). I think a Rodgers sequencer would be nearly plug and play.
      Generally, the trickiest part of midi is making sure everything is communicating correctly both ways (i.e. making sure the sequencer is expecting the Gt notes, stops, and expression values to be on channel X, Y, and Z).
      I haven't used a Rodgers sequencer, so I don't know the actual procedures to run one or set one up.
      Last edited by samibe; 01-28-2019, 12:29 PM.

    #48
    My sequencer is one made by Allen just for Allen organs. It has an infrared remote control that I can use from the rear of the church to start the processional remotely. The sequencer itself sits on top of the console. Not sure Rodgers has anything just like this though.

    Any modern unit will record everything you do as you play, including notes, stops, pistons, and expression. I think the old PR300 that Rodgers sold for years does all that, but floppy disk storage may be a problem. And I don't know that it has a remote control. Someone might have to press the Play button for you.

    Roland's MR200 is more modern and might be a good choice. Should work perfectly with that organ.
    John
    ----------
    Church: Allen MDS-45 with Allen MIDI-DIVISION-II expander
    Home: Allen Renaissance R-230 with expanded four-channel audio and MIDI-DIVISION-II
    Shop: Bunch of organs in varying conditions, some good, some not...
    Half of an incredible two-man organ service team -- servicing all the major digitals in Arkansas churches
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

    Comment


      #49
      As long as one has no keen prejudice against them, floppy disks work as well as they always have. As stated earlier, the MIDI files are extremely small enabling dozens to be stored on one 1.44 MB disk. Their reliability only becomes an issue when recorded disks sit around for a long time (many years). Anything recorded today will play for several years and can always be transferred to a hard drive via an inexpensive USB floppy drive.

      While they may not be readily available for new purchase, I would venture to say that within your church there are simply dozens, if not hundreds, moldering away in various drawers of various parishioners. And you only need about three. And a machine that uses floppies should be very "attractively priced". Both Yamaha and Roland made such machines in the late 80's to early 90's. USB is what ultimately supplanted floppies and the Roland Atelier line didn't make the jump until 2007, incredibly. So it isn't THAT far back in many cases.
      Roland Atelier AT-90s, AT-80s, AT-70, 30, and 15. Roland VR-760 combo
      Yamaha S-90, Kurzweil PC-3x, Casio Privia PX-330, Roland E-80, G-70, BK-5, Leslie 760, 820
      Moved on:
      Allen 3MT/Hauptwerk, Technics GA1, Yamaha HX1, AR80, numerous Hammonds, including 2 M's, an L, 2 A-100's, XP-2, XM-1/1c, & an XK-3. Roland Atelier AT-30, 60r, 80, & 20r(2 units), and a slew of Leslies (147, 142, 760, 900, 330).
      Korg Triton Le-61, Casio Privia PX-310 & 110, and Kurzweils: PC-2x, SP-88, Pro-III, K1000

      Comment


        #50
        Actually the MR-200 also uses floppy disk storage despite being a much newer piece of equipment than the PR300. I haven't seen either one up close, but I've seen two MR-200 for sale online. I have sent the particulars to my Trustee Committee for consideration, but while looking for an MR-200 I came across a program called Organ Assist! I am very intrigued with this program. So much so that I contacted its author and got a very warm and informative email in response. It appears to need a good deal of setup in return for a drop dead easy record/play back routine once over the setup hump. And you are working with whatever laptop platform is comfortable to you. And its free ...
        https://www.organassist.com/wp/
        Last edited by Leisesturm; 02-01-2019, 09:47 AM.

        Comment


          #51
          Has anybody tried Aria Maestosa? Just did a little experimenting with it sitting at desk -- wrote a few notes but couldn't then figure out how to send the track back to the beginning or play it.

          Comment


            #52
            Don't know if anyone is still caring about this thread. I've used MIDI since the mid-80s. I also use it for organ. Example, I can play a sequence using Cakewalk or Sonar. This allows me to walk around the Sanctuary and see how the sound is in various locations.

            Opinions are like rear ends: everybody has one. Mine is that most Allens do a fine job with MIDI. Our practice organ at the house is an Allen R-230. It is one of the Renaissance Organs. It has two manuals and a pedalboard. Ours also came with the Voice Expander.

            This organ will record notes and individual stop changes. You can also send volume settings to each of the two expression shoes. It is fascinating to watch the stops change - it is stops - not presets.

            I note that many here seem to prefer hardware sequencers. I'm a bit contrarian on that. I like the software better It is much easier to make corrections, change the selected stops used, transpose, speed up or slow down, just to name a few things.

            I still think Cakewalk Professional Audio 9 is the best version to use. I bought my copies from people on eBay. I want to say they were $20 or $30 each.

            I helped out a family friend a few years back by participating in a dedicatory concert for some pipes added to a Rogers 940. I discovered the Rogers is much harder to program sequences for. You must send tab changes using machine language. It isn't for the faint of heart. Too, Allens and all other organs use different MIDI Channel numbers for the pedal.

            Our Estey Organ now has a MIDI capability and a hardware sequencer. It will also take in and out from an external package (hardware or software). BUT I have been unable to alter individual stops or volume using an external sequencer or software.

            Let me hunt around and I can probably find the NRPN numbers for our Allen R230. The numbers will probably be slightly different for other Allen models. And most other brands of organs will ignore these numbers. It seems like NRPN stands for Non-Registered Patch Numbers. Still, you can put your sequencer in Record mode. Then starting on the left, flip ON and OFF each tab in a division. Stop the sequencer. Here is where the software version shines. Go and look for what has been recorded. Remember that MIDI is either ON or OFF. One command will turn the stop on. One command will turn off.

            I put the NRPN numbers for our organ in a spreadsheet. BTW, the signal to clear all stops is the MIDI Patch number for Gunshot. Ain't that a kicker?

            You actually see the tabs move on our Allen. The keys and pedals will not move. Neither will the expression shoes. I generally start with the expression pedals in their softest position. Our R230 has LED indicators to show the position of the twin expression shoes. They WILL work on the Allen R230.

            One caveat. Our Estey Organ at church has Peterson Controls throughout. So when the MIDI system was added, SHOCK!!! They installed a Peterson MIDI system ($14,000). Hear/Read what I'm about to tell you. This system cannot handle quick repetitions of the same note. If you try to play the Bach Sinfonia to Cantata to 29 on our church organ using MIDI, it will drop every other note unless you slow the tempo down to something appropriate for a funeral dirge. I made Peterson aware of it. I think they knew it, but just don't want to go in redesign the system.

            BTW - Artisan has a MIDI system.

            Bach On
            Make being happy a way of traveling, not just a destination.

            Church organ - 2 manual 12 rank Estey Pipe Organ with 12 Artisan Digital Stops
            Home organ - Allen R-230 organ (We also have 48 pipes in a facade)
            We have a Yamaha 6' 8" Grand
            Have used an older Korg T3 keyboard and MIDI for doing musical arrangements.
            I'm a Methodist organist.
            I taught high school chorus, elementary music and middle school music.
            Became a Technology Specialist.
            Retired from Education after 32 years.

            Comment


              #53
              Here is the listing of NRPN numbers for our Allen Renaissance R-230. They MAY work on other Allen Models. I do not think they will work on Rogers organs or many other brands. But you can add your own stops and adjust the volume yourself.

              Swell (Channel 1)
              11 - 16' Lieblech Gedackt
              40 - 8' Gedact
              34 - 8' Viola Pomposa
              35 - 8' Viola Celest
              56 - 4' Octave Geigen
              63 - 4' Transverse Flute
              76 - 2 2/3 Nazard
              80 - 2' Piccolo
              91 - 1 3/5 Tierce
              100 - Fourniture IV
              114 - 16' Waldhorn
              128 - 8' French Trumpet
              133 - 8' Obie
              176 - Tremulant (for Swell)
              166 - Celesta
              159 - Harpsichord
              271 - Swell Unison Off
              222 - MIDI to Swell
              198 - Solo Organ Voices

              Great (Channel 2)
              31 - 8' Diapason
              40 - 8' Harmonic Flute
              43 - Flute Celeste
              56 - 4' Octave
              63 - 4' Spitzflote
              80 - 2' Fifteenth
              100 - Mixture IV
              128 - 8' Tromba
              132 - 8' Krummhorn
              176 - Tremulant (Great AND Pedal)
              161 - Chimes
              243 - Swell to Great
              223 - MIDI to Great
              198 - Classic Voicing

              Pedals (Channel 3) - Note if the pedals don't work, check to see if the channel assigned is #4 instead of #3.
              9 - 16' Diapason
              11 - 16' Bourdon
              15 - 16' Liebleck Gedackt
              31 - 8' Octav
              56 - 4' Choral Bass
              100 - Mixture III
              114 - Posaune
              128 - Tromba
              248 - Great to Pedal
              247 -Swell to Pedal
              224 - MIDI to Pedal

              I'll throw in one sequence that show how these are used.

              Bach On
              Last edited by Bach-On; 08-10-2019, 07:18 PM.
              Make being happy a way of traveling, not just a destination.

              Church organ - 2 manual 12 rank Estey Pipe Organ with 12 Artisan Digital Stops
              Home organ - Allen R-230 organ (We also have 48 pipes in a facade)
              We have a Yamaha 6' 8" Grand
              Have used an older Korg T3 keyboard and MIDI for doing musical arrangements.
              I'm a Methodist organist.
              I taught high school chorus, elementary music and middle school music.
              Became a Technology Specialist.
              Retired from Education after 32 years.

              Comment


                #54
                Click image for larger version  Name:	MIDI code.jpg Views:	4 Size:	80.8 KB ID:	662636

                16256 is the code to turn a stop on. 0 is the code to turn it off. So you enter the NRPN number of the stop. Then you tell it 16256 to turn the stop on. Or 0 to turn it off.

                Volume is handled by a Controller. 7 is the controller number for volume. The values can be 0 to 127, 0 is silent 127 is wide open. So this sequence begins by setting the Volume Controller for Channel 1 (the Swell) to 65. Then the Volume Controller for Channel 2 (the Great AND Pedals) is set to 85.

                I programmed this one myself. It begins midway loud on volume. The continuo is played on the Great (Channel 2). The orchestra accompaniment is played on the Swell (Channel 1). Sometimes things crescendo, Sometimes they actually decrescendo, I'll throw in the MIDI file in the next post. If you can see a list of the MIDI events, you'll see the equivalent of what I just posted for the entire file.

                If you just listen outside of a sequencing program, you'll hear all played on a electronic keyboard. Play it through your organ and it may play. Remember you may have to change the Channel number for your pedals. This one was set for our Allen (Channel 3).

                SINFONIA TO 29 midi file(1).mid

                Here is the raw MIDI file

                Good luck!

                Bach On (

                P.S. I have sometimes written sequences that were arrangements that might include parts for piano and organ. I would play the piano while the organ, for example, was played by the sequencer. The challenge can be to begin together. I tried something that worked for me. I used the NRPN numbers to have an organ tab flip "in tempo" to set a count down. Like "Ah 1, 2, 3, 4, Start" in a piece of music written in 4/4 time.

                It worked like this. I had one stop tab (any of them would work) flip on and off in tempo.

                MBT numbers are according to tempo (see above)
                Left-most numbers are the measures, then the second 01 is the first beat, 000 are positions between beats one and two.

                01:01:000 Channel 2 NRPN 40 16256 (flips the 8' Harmonic Flute tab ON)
                01:02:000 Channel 2 NRPN 40 0 (flips it OFF)
                01:03:000 Channel 2 NRPN 40 16256
                01:04:000 Channel 2 NRPN 40 0
                Then the music would start at 02:01:000

                This method also makes a VERY SOFT mechanical sound the pianist can just barely hear as the tab flips on and off.

                It is better than having the organ play a set of tones of some type to do the count, which an audience would hear.

                Off to church!
                Attached Files
                Last edited by Bach-On; 08-11-2019, 05:57 AM.
                Make being happy a way of traveling, not just a destination.

                Church organ - 2 manual 12 rank Estey Pipe Organ with 12 Artisan Digital Stops
                Home organ - Allen R-230 organ (We also have 48 pipes in a facade)
                We have a Yamaha 6' 8" Grand
                Have used an older Korg T3 keyboard and MIDI for doing musical arrangements.
                I'm a Methodist organist.
                I taught high school chorus, elementary music and middle school music.
                Became a Technology Specialist.
                Retired from Education after 32 years.

                Comment


                • myorgan
                  myorgan commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Bach-On,

                  I like your idea, however, for live performance I often ignore the tempo of the sequencer because it is too rigid for my tastes. That said, your method allows for both instruments to start together, then the tempo can be shared by the two as the piece continues.

                  The issue I've run into is that some organ/piano duets have one instrument silent while the other plays. It's difficult to get the sequencer exact, so I've often played just the bass note softly on the piano at a velocity of approximately 20-30. That allowed me to keep the organ part with the piano as I play. I like your method better, though.

                  Michael

                #55
                BTW - I was curious if Android devices could do MIDI. Short answer is they can play simple MIDI sequences within themselves. They cannot, however, send or receive MIDI to/from external devices because no commands or system for MIDI were included in the Android infrastructure. Some attempts to add the capability have been attempted, but MIDI is now considered OLD.

                BO
                Make being happy a way of traveling, not just a destination.

                Church organ - 2 manual 12 rank Estey Pipe Organ with 12 Artisan Digital Stops
                Home organ - Allen R-230 organ (We also have 48 pipes in a facade)
                We have a Yamaha 6' 8" Grand
                Have used an older Korg T3 keyboard and MIDI for doing musical arrangements.
                I'm a Methodist organist.
                I taught high school chorus, elementary music and middle school music.
                Became a Technology Specialist.
                Retired from Education after 32 years.

                Comment


                  #56
                  Michael,

                  Wonder if this would work for when one instrument goes tacet (silent). Use the method I've suggest for the countdown, and just have a stop tab flip for the first beat of each measure during the section where the tacet instrument is silently "counting measures" before playing again. It would be like an almost silent metronome.

                  Flip, 2, 3, 4, Flip, 2, 3, 4. etc.

                  Do NRPN numbers work on your Walker?

                  BO
                  Make being happy a way of traveling, not just a destination.

                  Church organ - 2 manual 12 rank Estey Pipe Organ with 12 Artisan Digital Stops
                  Home organ - Allen R-230 organ (We also have 48 pipes in a facade)
                  We have a Yamaha 6' 8" Grand
                  Have used an older Korg T3 keyboard and MIDI for doing musical arrangements.
                  I'm a Methodist organist.
                  I taught high school chorus, elementary music and middle school music.
                  Became a Technology Specialist.
                  Retired from Education after 32 years.

                  Comment


                    #57
                    Originally posted by Bach-On View Post
                    Michael,

                    Do NRPN numbers work on your Walker?
                    I don't have a Walker.

                    Michael
                    Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
                    • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
                    • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
                    • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 4 Pianos

                    Comment


                      #58
                      I have used an Allen sequencer to play the organ while I play the piano (duet with myself). I have also pre-recorded a digital piano's sequencer then played the organ live. In either case, I always play an "introduction" into the sequencer so it starts first, then I join in on the live instrument. For fun, I often have someone who can't play a note on piano or organ as my sequencer starter. Always gets an audience reaction when that non-player sits on the bench and then music starts! And then another reaction when they walk back to their seat & the music continues.

                      Comment


                        #59
                        I believe those NRPN's are common to nearly all Allen models. Allen came up with their list of numbers so that MIDI files created on one Allen could be played on any other Allen as long as it had "similar" stops. Thus, the sets of MIDI files that Allen sells with their current sequencer will play on any MIDI-equipped Allen going all the way back to the first MDS models about 1990. While the stop lists of all the models sold since then have varied in details, almost any Allen will have the "basic set" of stops, such as principals on the great from 8' up through mixture, flutes at 8 & 4 (whatever they may be called on a given organ), swell 8' string and celeste, the usual swell flutes and mutations, reeds at 16, 8, and 4, pedal stops from 32' up through mixture. And the expectation is that the various stops will be more or less properly related in volume and color on any well-voiced Allen. So a sequence created on a current Quantum model may not sound exactly identical when played back on a 1991 MDS organ, but it will sound "right" -- the proper choruses and solo stops, etc., will be drawn, and the expression will track correctly.

                        My experience with sequencers is not large, but I do use my Allen "Smart Recorder" every week to record the processional hymn at home (on my R-230) and play it back at church on the MDS-45. I have two of the Smart Recorders, one at home, one at church, so I don't have to carry it back and forth. Even with the differences in stop lists, the hymns I record at home play back just the way I want them to when I pop the floppy into the player at church.

                        It would be nice to be able to edit my sequences, which I could do of course if I used Cakewalk. Especially when I make a stupid mistake! Sometimes I'd dearly love to just go in and bleep out one lousy note than I played wrong. But using the plain old hardware sequencer is very easy and painless, and in time I've learned to be more forgiving of my mistakes, as I know that nobody else will notice the mistake in the service. With the choir processing in and everybody singing, no one is taking notes on how perfectly the organ is being played! (At least that's my hope.)
                        John
                        ----------
                        Church: Allen MDS-45 with Allen MIDI-DIVISION-II expander
                        Home: Allen Renaissance R-230 with expanded four-channel audio and MIDI-DIVISION-II
                        Shop: Bunch of organs in varying conditions, some good, some not...
                        Half of an incredible two-man organ service team -- servicing all the major digitals in Arkansas churches
                        https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

                        Comment


                          #60
                          That those NRPN numbers are pretty portable among various Allens has been my experience. I wish it was so for all organs. It is made needlessly complicated by some brands. Tastes vary. And for some manufacturers the use of MIDI is seen as one step above "Bubba the redneck tries to play the organ". I stand to be corrected, but I think many organists feel that way too, Tell the truth - don't some of you know people who still say (and/or believe) "the only REAL ORGAN is a PIPE ORGAN?" I know plenty of them. "Even the worst pipe organ in the world is better than any electronic organ."

                          I had an older Korg T3 workstation years ago. It could play 16 channels of sampled voices. It had an internal sequencer with 3.5 inch floppy disks for saving your arrangements. It could also work with other MIDI devices - such as our Allen R230. BUT IT WAS VERY CHALLENGING TO GET A VARIETY OF INSTRUMENTS TO PLAY NICELY WITH OTHERS.

                          Mistakes do happen when arranging and recording. And IF YOU CAN FIND THEM, you can delete them IF YOU HAVE ENOUGH TIME. I generally found it was very time consuming and would test the limits of my patience. Cakewalk has so many options to change things. PLUS IT HAS AN UNDO FEATURE several layers deep. Few internal sequencers do. As some have said, MIDI is not taxing on a computer. It's just math - and that's what computers do best. Changing NRPN numbers, channel numbers, and a host of other things can't be easily done on a sequencer. And it is hard to post it here. JBird, I think I read that you use a remote to start music for the processional for your Sunday services from the rear of the Sanctuary. I can get Cakewalk ready, then use a kid to just hit the space bar and accomplish the same thing.

                          I have a friend who says, "MIDI has no soul." And he's right. But...

                          But if you haven't heard the Garritan Voices that can be bought through Finale' you haven't heard how much better MIDI based electronic voices have become. Many of them are leap years beyond those "samples" from the 1980s. My church doesn't have the budget to hire an orchestra - even a small ensemble. I can - however - get a fairly nice sounding ensemble using MIDI and a laptop computer loaded with Finale. I can even burn a CD of the "performance" and play it through a church or home sound system.

                          I stand to be corrected, but I don't think you can do these things with an internal sequencer. Even an old laptop computer with limited memory and hard disk space is more than adequate for Cakewalk or even Finale. Then a modest sound system adjacent to the organ is sufficient to provide instruments beyond the organ. Some here are able to remember the old Music Minus One series. These were records of the piano or orchestral accompaniment to some concerto. You'd learn the "solo" instrumental part and play along with the Orchestral accompaniment. I remember doing this for some clarinet pieces. That's the way I approach MIDI for church. No. It isn't as good as a real instrumental ensemble, but I don't have the bucks for that ensemble. And it is ready whenever I have the time to work on it. I can do something that sounds better than the piano or organ alone. And it just takes me becoming familiar with how to do the MIDI related stuff.

                          You'll only take Cakewalk and Finale away from me by prying it out of my cold, dead hands.

                          Warmly,
                          BO

                          There are some (ahem) samples at this link.

                          https://www.garritan.com/
                          Last edited by Bach-On; 08-14-2019, 03:22 AM.
                          Make being happy a way of traveling, not just a destination.

                          Church organ - 2 manual 12 rank Estey Pipe Organ with 12 Artisan Digital Stops
                          Home organ - Allen R-230 organ (We also have 48 pipes in a facade)
                          We have a Yamaha 6' 8" Grand
                          Have used an older Korg T3 keyboard and MIDI for doing musical arrangements.
                          I'm a Methodist organist.
                          I taught high school chorus, elementary music and middle school music.
                          Became a Technology Specialist.
                          Retired from Education after 32 years.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X