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Gulbransen Rialto II suddenly stopped making all sound

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  • Gulbransen Rialto II suddenly stopped making all sound

    Hello All! I am new to this forum and am hoping someone can point me in the right direction. I inherited a Gulbransen Rialto II home theatre organ about 5 years ago. It has been working beautifully since we squeezed into our home. Two weeks ago, I was really putting on a show. Classic rock with a Bossa Nova rhythm - my kids were begging me to make it stop. I finished up my performance, shut the organ off. When I went to fire it up a little while later, it turned on, lit up but when I selected any stops, no sound. Pressing the preset registrations or selecting Piano or Chimes - no sound. Rhythm - no sound. I have the service manual but have absolutely no idea where to begin looking. Is there a main connection between the keyboard and the sound?? Sorry if this reveals how little I know about this. I reached out to a technician in Milwaukee and he said they could get it working but I'd need to bring it to their shop. I'm not sure I can convince anyone in my house to actually move this beast out of the house, across town and then back into the house after it is repaired. Any thoughts on where I should start?

    Thanks,
    Sarah

  • #2
    Start with the power supply. First, I'd check over all the electrolytic capacitors and look for any signs of deterioration. I'd possibly replace them anyway given the age of the organ. Check all the voltages that the power supply is delivering and that they are getting to where they should get to in the organ. No sound could mean amplifier issues and sometimes there's a relay that connects the speakers after a few seconds to avoid a 'thump' when you switch on. If that's failed, or if there's DC leaking from the amps, the speakers won't be connected. Plug in headphones and see if they work.

    You could go to www.mitatechs.com and see if you can find a tech who will come to you in their listings.
    It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

    New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

    Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
    Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
    Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
    Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

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    • #3
      Welcome to the forum! Glad you were enjoying playing it. Andy is right on about first steps. If you can check the voltages on the power supply and also check for any AC leakage, then probably recap the power supply that would be a good first step. From there, let us know what you find, and we can help you along. If the power supply has gone, it probably damaged other boards in the organ that will have to be repaired.

      If you’re not tech savvy this way, then you may need to find a way to get it to your repair person. You are blessed to have a repair person! Not all cities do. If you can’t move it, you can hire someone to move it. Movers with piano experience are often a good bet. Either way know that the organ probably isn’t worth much, and you may quickly have an expensive bill to keep it running!

      -Current Instruments: Allen Mos-2 225 RTC,1870's W. Bell Reed organ, 1890's Singer Chicago upright grand piano Former Instruments: Yamaha Electone E3R
      -Website: https://www.exercisesincatholicmythology.com

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      • #4
        Thanks for your help! I am not that tech savvy but have an amazing brother in law that is a whiz with electronics. He did exactly what you suggested. It was a couple shorted resistors on the 20 volt power supply board. I purchased parts for about $30 and he repaired the board. He's not sure what shorted it. I suggested I was just playing that well that the organ just said - stop, stop all that talent:) In looking for the REAL source of the short, he said something about the volume pedal being an adjustable resistor. He suggested I move the pedal up and down a few times before firing up the organ. Does that make sense?

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        • #5
          That should not make any difference. There's only a tiny voltage going through the pedal's potentiometer, which controls the signal levels going into the main amps. But interestingly, I've seen more than a few organists who waggle the pedal as a habit when they first sit down at the organ, so it won't do any harm and may in fact help to keep the potentiometer clean!

          Next time your brother in law is with you, it would be a good idea to change the capacitors on that board any way simply because of their age. They don't last forever and if they leak they can do some damage.

          Anyway, glad that the Rialto II is up and running again, and you're able to make music with it.
          It's not what you play. It's not how you play. It's the fact that you're playing that counts.

          New website now live - www.andrew-gilbert.com

          Current instruments: Roland Atelier AT900 Platinum Edition, Yamaha PSR-S970, Kawai K1m
          Retired Organs: Lots! Kawai SR6 x 2, Hammond L122, T402, T500 x 2, X5. Conn Martinique and 652. Gulbransen 2102 Pacemaker. Kimball Temptation.
          Retired Leslies, 147, 145 x 2, 760 x 2, 710, 415 x 2.
          Retired synths: Korg 700, Roland SH1000, Jen Superstringer, Kawai S100F, Kawai S100P, Kawai K1

          Comment

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