Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Scary malicious web page from clicking on ad at top of page

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Scary malicious web page from clicking on ad at top of page

    I normally ignore the new ads that are appearing between the Notifications/Messages/Login tabs and the body of the organ forum. But this AM I saw one for a light festival that intrigued me so I clicked on it. After a momentary pause I saw a screen with two windows of scrolling file names, like you see in the movies when someone is downloading files from a computer, and a window demanding my Windows license key. I could not close Firefox, it was locked from being closed.

    So I pulled the power cord on my router and forced a shutdown of my Windows 7 computer. When I restarted the computer I ran a full virus scan. An hour later It did not show any corrupted files. I've seen a few scary web pages in the past but the closest to this was when another forum site I visit was hit with a ransomware attack.

    I gather these ads are provided by Google and provide a fee to the site administrators so perhaps I was naive to think that they were checked for malicious links and malware attacks before being broadcast to subscribers like the Organ Forum. From now on I will not trust them and will not click on them, no matter how appealing.
    Larry is my name; Allen is an organ brand name.

    Main: Allen RMWTHEA.3 with Rocky Mount Electra-Piano, Allen 423-C + Gyro cabinet, Britson Opus OEM38, Saville Series IV Opus 209, Steinway AR Duo-Art, Mills Violano Virtuoso with MIDI
    Lower Level: Hammond 9812H with roll player, Gulbransen Rialto, Roland E-200, Vintage Moog
    Shop: Mason&Hamlin AR Ampico piano, Allen ADC-5300-D with 18 speakers and MIDI, 4 Allen theater organ tone cabinets (including 3 Gyros, but don't call me Gyro Gearloose!).

    #2
    You did the right thing by pulling the plug, however if you hold your finger on the power button for more than 4 secs the computer will power off straight away.
    If it happens again, right click the Taskbar and select Task Manager, when it opens highlight the program you wish to close and click the End Task Button, this will close the program down and you can then run a virus scan.
    Also Win 7 extended support is ending soon (There will be no more security updates) so look to upgrade to Win 10, (If you run the upgrade from the Microsoft website it should still be free) alternatively you could also try one of the Linux Distros (Linux Mint is probably the best for Windows users) as you can use it to dual boot between Win 7 and Linux. (There are plenty videos on YouTube on how to do it)

    Bill

    Comment


    • Admin
      Admin commented
      Editing a comment
      For Windows 7, which is now over ten years old, mainstream support ended in January of 2015 which puts most home computers at increased risk even though security patches are available. For Enterprise users, Extended support ends in January of 2020, after which no one gets security patches. The increased risk for operating systems of this age is that the drivers for these older operating systems are also likely to be unsupported by their hardware manufacturers and are also vulnerable targets.
      https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/...cle-fact-sheet
      Last edited by Admin; 03-02-2019, 03:18 PM.

    #3
    Originally posted by abacus View Post
    You did the right thing by pulling the plug, however if you hold your finger on the power button for more than 4 secs the computer will power off straight away.
    If it happens again, right click the Taskbar and select Task Manager, when it opens highlight the program you wish to close and click the End Task Button, this will close the program down and you can then run a virus scan.
    Bill,

    I agree with pulling the plug, but in the past (as tech admin) when I've tried right-clicking on someone's computer, it was disabled and Task Manager wouldn't come up. Pulling the plug is the best option, and won't cause any lasting damage to the computer. I'll also alert Admin to the content of this thread, because there may be something he can do about it.

    Michael
    Way too many organs to list, but I do have 5 Allens:
    • MOS-2 Model 505-B / ADC-4300-DK / ADC-5400 / ADC-6000 (Symphony) / ADC-8000DKC
    • Lowrey Heritage (DSO-1)
    • 9 Pump Organs, 1 Pipe Organ & 4 Pianos

    Comment


      #4
      The banner ads at the top of page are served by Google and we have little control over what is served, and in fact, what you see in those ads is customized based upon the sites you've previously visited. I'm sure Google performs some screening process, but that doesn't preclude the content of the links in the ad from being hacked or altered after the ad was screened. This is true not only of ads, but is true of any link on the Internet. I had something similar happen a few weeks back when I clicked a news link on the CNN site.

      If the hacked page takes up the entire screen, pulling the power on computer is what I do. Of course, if you're on a lap top or mobile device, you don't have that option and the best you can do is to attempt to shut down the device. If it's just taken over the browser window, I'll use Task Manager (ctrl+alt+delete) to kill the browser process, falling back to pulling the plug if Task Manager won't come up.

      The best way to protect yourself from these attacks is to make sure that you are running the latest version of your operating system with the latest security updates. I cringe whenever someone tells me that they're running Windows XP or using any version of Internet Explorer and I've warned against using OSs and programs that are beyond their EOL. many times on this forum. Windows 10 is far more secure than previous versions of Windows, especially if you allow the security patches to install themselves automatically. Same goes for browsers, and especially for third party browser extensions. As a matter of policy, I don't install browser extensions unless absolutely necessary, and I haven't found any that were absolutely necessary.

      To those tempted to respond that they don't like Windows 10, that XP or Windows 7 or 8.1 is working just fine for them, that they're using a Mac or Linux so they're immune from risk, or they don't want to apply patches, save your breath. That's your decision and if you choose to take the risk, that's on you.

      As a computer professional who worked on some very mission critical software, I'm very concerned about security. That is why I expended the time and money to update this site's software and infrastructure earlier this year and am conscientious about applying the latest patches both on the websites I manage and at home.
      Last edited by Admin; 03-02-2019, 03:09 PM.
      -Admin

      Allen 965
      Zuma Group Midi Keyboard Encoder
      Zuma Group DM Midi Stop Controller
      Hauptwerk 4.2

      Comment


      • myorgan
        myorgan commented
        Editing a comment
        Just in case someone doesn't know:
        * OS=Operating System
        * EOL=End Of Life (when a browser or operating system is no longer supported)

        Hope that helps.

        Thanks, Admin for the clarification.

        Michael

      #5
      I am a network security guy (webfarm), I use Linux, and am very confident in my security. I live in a rural area, with just 'sort of OK' bandwidth. I run everything at home through a local caching Squid proxy, to save bandwidth, and I block ads to save bandwidth, and block most scripts for privacy. Now here, I cannot, and I am perfectly fine to support organforum.com by turning off adblock.
      Click image for larger version

Name:	of-adblock.jpg
Views:	59
Size:	34.6 KB
ID:	651203
      Unwanted Bitcoin? Dispose of them safely here:14hjbheQVki8eG75otRK4d2MQBarCCWQfJ

      Comment

      Working...
      X