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Please avoid slang, substandard, regional/dialectical, and colloquial English

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    Please avoid slang, substandard, regional/dialectical, and colloquial English

    I hope that this is a good place to remind people that this is an international forum. I'm appreciative that it's in my native language(English). But, even as a native speaker, I've come across many posts that are a chore for ME to understand. I feel sorry for the members for whom English is a foreign language trying to understand disjointed, stream-of-consciousness, slang-filled posts. Please consider this when posting. Thank you

    #2
    For 8 years I worked for a Japanese company and learned this lesson well. It's also best to avoid idiomatic usage where the grammar of the usage doesn't match the meaning, such as "I only have eyes for you"--the grammar means I am delivering some eyes and they are not for anyone else.

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    • drg
      drg commented
      Editing a comment
      😆👍 so true

    #3
    Originally posted by toodles View Post
    "I only have eyes for you"--the grammar means I am delivering some eyes and they are not for anyone else.
    No no no. It means I am only delivering the eyes. The other body parts you ordered will be here another time.
    When I become dictator, those who preach intolerance will not be tolerated.

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      #4
      I would certainly miss something if people stopped using idiomatic English. Of course some idioms are misleading at first or could be called "false friends", but you can learn such a lot from them and also learn how the other language works and how people think.
      Yes, "easy English" might make the conversation easier and sometimes is the right thing, but what person A finds easy to understand might still be difficult for person B.
      So far, I haven't seen any colloquial or slang expressions here that left me completely baffled. But that might be because I don't read all the discussions.
      Thanks for thinking about language and what its usage means, but please continue to bring your local lingual oddities, too.

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        #5
        Engrish is fun.

        You should see how Google translate does The Sound of Silence.

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          #6
          English in general is a disaster. Imagine if we tried to use only English phrases that would be fully understandable the way we intend, in 50 years. Just try reading something written 50, 100, or 500 years ago. This is why we should just use Esperanto. As a side benefit, everyone everywhere has a similar chance of understanding it.

          Really though, English seems to be a reasonable compromise (sp. compromize?). When we reach idioms and phrases that don't make sense, they are easy to figure out. Almost everyone in the world can search the web for the meaning. This reminds me of the argument for metric. Never in history has it made more sense than now to *not* standardise on metric. Everyone in the world has access to a calculator that can instantly convert to the familiar units of preference. The more unfamiliar English that we encounter, the better we all understand the modern dialects.

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          • Ben Madison
            Ben Madison commented
            Editing a comment
            Why certainly you have a point, you need to understand however, that English, that we understand it to be is derived its roots in old Germanic. Don't judge it too harshly for it is a mishmash of various languages that has been the result of our country being a melting pot what been brought into the country by imagrints. So the next time you hand in your resumé thank the French.

          • KC9UDX
            KC9UDX commented
            Editing a comment
            Well, the history is actually a bit more interesting than that. New World influence on English is pretty minor, actually.
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