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  • Rodgers M-10 speaker problem

    Hello Forum,
    I'm hoping someone out there has experienced the same problem and can help me troubleshoot.
    There is a quite large Rodgers organ 800 series in my area and having problems with a M-10 speaker located on the swell division.
    While playing, the organist discovered there was a crackling in that particular speaker. When I arrived, I discovered she was right and upon examining the speaker, one or more of the 6X9 speakers were dropping out and in again. I could not find a problem with connections so I brought the speaker to the shop and have applied a tone to it and let it stay on. Now that it is in the shop, it will not fail.
    If anyone has experienced the same problem, please let me know what you found. Could it be bad spade connectors on the speakers or a bad connection on the crossover or a failing NP capacitor? I just don't know and I hate to bring it back without finding the problem. I do intend to replace the cap and possibly solder the speaker wires to the speakers and eliminate the spade connectors but if I can't make it fail in the shop, I am not satisfied.
    If anyone out there can help, please let me know.
    Thank you!

  • #2
    I don't recall ever having any strange problems with M-10 speakers. It's likely that the connection to the cabinet was not solid, or else there is a break in the cable or other disconnect between the console and the speaker cabinet.

    We have run into several squirrel-damaged church organs in recent months. These little monsters find their way into a church and try to make a home in the remote, quiet, dark spaces of the organ chambers, where they eat speaker cones and nibble the wires.

    Squirrel, rat, or human being -- all these animals can and will cut and otherwise damage speaker wires. So trace the wiring from console to cabinet, and be sure the spade lugs at the speaker end are properly soldered or at least solidly crimped and free of wire whiskers that can cause intermittent shorting. If the organ was wired up with common zip cord, it may be crumbling by now and might have developed a short between the conductors.

    While you have the M-10 in the shop, just be sure it has no loose wiring or bad solder joints. I haven't seen this, but anything is possible in a speaker cabinet 40 or more years old.
    John
    ----------
    *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

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    • #3
      6x9 Speaker Connection Question

      Thank you John for your reply.
      If my main line was not connected securely, the whole speaker cabinet would go dead but it's only a few 6X9 speakers in the cabinet as the tweeters are working and some of the 6X9's.
      I was at the cabinet when it was partially failing. My concern would be that the connectors on the speakers were making poorly but everyone of them were tightly clipped onto the speakers and hard to disconnect. I guess my question is: has anyone seen these connectors corrode and would it be wise to solder the wires to the speakers? These are the connectors that push onto the terminals of the speakers. There was no sign of rodent damage in the church and there is at least 6 more speaker cabinets that are working just fine. I was able to disconnect this speaker from the system with no apparent sound loss so they could get by for a wedding today.
      Have you ever seen these push on connectors corrode to the point of lack of connection or at least create a poor connection?

      Thread moved to appropriate Forum from General Chat sticky. Michael - Moderator.
      Last edited by myorgan; 05-19-2018, 02:12 PM. Reason: Reason for move.

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      • #4
        Those push-on terminals seem to work quite well--surprisingly so, considering their low cost. Just goes to show what spring force can do for an electrical connection. Of course, the same principle is what makes insulation displacement connectors and wire-wrap connections provide a reliable connection, so maybe it is not so surprising.

        I've never seen this type of connection corrode, but anything is possible. Soldering speakers is, of course, a very reliable connection technique and the only downside is more difficulty in case replacement is needed.

        Standard technique for diagnosis of your problem is to swap speaker cabinets to see if the intermittent issue moves with the cabinet or stays on the same channel--that tells you if the problem is upstream of the cabinet or in the cabinet.

        You don't really indicate the exact model of organ you are working with, and the "800" series description spans at least a decade, maybe 15 years. Ways of doing things changed at Rodgers rather quickly during that time. At the start, amplifiers were mounted in the cabinet and at the end they were mounted in the console.

        In any case, you have to chase the signal back to the source until you find what is intermittent.

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        • #5
          See my reply here: http://www.organforum.com/forums/sho...511#post479511

          Kansas--it helps a lot if you keep your replies within the same thread rather than starting a new one.
          Last edited by toodles; 05-19-2018, 08:30 PM.

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          • #6
            This is a later model as the amplifier is in the console. It is only a 2 channel. When no other speakers are affected and only a few speakers are cutting out on the M-10, I don't understand how it could be wiring except in the speaker cabinet itself. The other two smaller column speakers on the swell are working fine

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            • #7
              Sorry, I thought I was just answering your message. Next time I will go back to the main thread.

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              • #8
                While I haven't known the 6x9 speakers to fail, it's always possible. Since they're wired in a series/parallel arrangement, you can disconnect them one at a time to find the bad one. The rest will continue to play, I think, because each group of three is in simple parallel.
                John
                ----------
                *** Please post your questions about technical service or repair matters ON THE FORUM. Do not send your questions to me or another member by private message. Information shared is for the benefit of the entire organ community, but other folks will not be helped by information we exchange in private messages!

                https://www.facebook.com/pages/Birds...97551893588434

                Comment

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